Burning Issue

THE VOICE OF THE CAPE  |  Podcast , ±51 min episodes every 2 weeks  | 
The content echoes the name of the show – a platform that creates discussion around issues of religion, legal, consumer related, news and human interest stories. Hosted by presenter Riedwaan Ahmed. The 2 hour discussion show is interactive with the lines open for people to voice their opinions while the experts answer the questions.

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03
JUL

Is mob justice being normalised in our communities?

Cape Town was rocked by yet another child murder this past weekend– that of 6 year old Stacey Adams from Eastridge. Stacey was buried this afternoon by Islamic rites. Her body was found buried in a shallow grave, next to a wendy house where she had lived with her 24 year old mother Sasha Lee Adams and her boyfriend, who was subsequently arrested.
Now as police investigated the crime scene on Sunday afternoon, and with the suspect inside the house, residents gathered outside baying for flood – with some individuals torching the main house, on which this wendy house was attached to. The suspect was quickly evacuated by police.
Tempers flared in Eastridge again last night as a group of residents again gathered outside the home, and this time, they destroyed the wendy house, where Stacey had lived. Some of the residents that VOC News spoke to, made it very clear that they wanted to avenge Staceys death and they want their own form of justice against the alleged perpetrator.
Remember that this is not the first time we see this type of community reaction to child violence. We saw similar violence last year in the case of 13 year old Rene Roman from Lavender Hill and earlier this year, the same thing happened when it was discovered that a 9 year old girl was raped in Tafelsig. And then we all know the case of Courtney Pieters from Elsies River, whose mother was threatened with violence shortly after Courtney’s body was found.
So tonight we tackle a very emotive topic – that of mob justice or mob violence. Why is this becoming the norm and what is its cause and effect?
03
JUL

Is mob justice being normalised in our communities?

Cape Town was rocked by yet another child murder this past weekend– that of 6 year old Stacey Adams from Eastridge. Stacey was buried this afternoon by Islamic rites. Her body was found buried in a shallow grave, next to a wendy house where she had lived with her 24 year old mother Sasha Lee Adams and her boyfriend, who was subsequently arrested.
Now as police investigated the crime scene on Sunday afternoon, and with the suspect inside the house, residents gathered outside baying for flood – with some individuals torching the main house, on which this wendy house was attached to. The suspect was quickly evacuated by police.
Tempers flared in Eastridge again last night as a group of residents again gathered outside the home, and this time, they destroyed the wendy house, where Stacey had lived. Some of the residents that VOC News spoke to, made it very clear that they wanted to avenge Staceys death and they want their own form of justice against the alleged perpetrator.
Remember that this is not the first time we see this type of community reaction to child violence. We saw similar violence last year in the case of 13 year old Rene Roman from Lavender Hill and earlier this year, the same thing happened when it was discovered that a 9 year old girl was raped in Tafelsig. And then we all know the case of Courtney Pieters from Elsies River, whose mother was threatened with violence shortly after Courtney’s body was found.
So tonight we tackle a very emotive topic – that of mob justice or mob violence. Why is this becoming the norm and what is its cause and effect?
03
JUL

Should the City of Cape Town scrap the water tariffs and Level 6B water restrictions?

Cape Town had beautiful rainfall over the past few days and so far, it’s been a good winter season – so certainly it seems as though we have have sailed out of troubled waters. Last week, the City of Cape Town said it was confident it can avoid Day Zero until at least 2020, as the dams are seeing a significant improvement. Dam levels are currently at 43 percent and we still have more than two months of expected rainfall ahead of us.
But the high water tariffs are still a concern for many residents and water activists. A proposed 55.16% increase in water tariffs had residents in an uproar earlier this year. But after consideration and assessment of the City’s draft budget for 2018/19 – the tariff was reduced to 10.10%.
But some believe it’s time for these tariffs to be scrapped, as there is no longer Day Zero. Tonight we unpack the issue with some water activists and also get a response from the City of Cape Town’s deputy mayor Ian Nielsen
You are welcome to join in on the discussion throughout the show via Sms 47913 or Whatsapp: 072 238 0712. We can open the lines at 6.40pm for a few callers on the number 021 442 3530 and in the second hour as well
In-studio we have:

-Anne-Marie Smith, co-ordinator from Save Cape Town
-Shaheed Mahomed, a water activist
-Sandra Dickson, Founder of the Stop CoCT action group
-Sulayman Stellenboom, Tafelsig Activist Forum founder
20
JUN

Bo Kaap rises: How the community is reclaiming its streets

Now Ramadan was certainly a decisive time for Bo Kaap and many communities across the Cape Flats, as we saw an uprising from ordinary citizens against government on key issues such as housing and service delivery. In Bo Kaap specifically, the spotlight was placed firmly on the issue of gentrification, high municipal tariffs, and the preservation of the area’s rich Muslim culture and heritage.
Tonight we want to unpack and reflect on how these social issues are playing out in the community and what is the role of the civic organisations in Bo Kaap as they drive the process forward
15
MAY

Siqalo and Mitchels Plain...a rebellion of the poor

The recent violent protests over the demand for electricity and water in the Siqalo informal settlement outside Mitchells Plain have put the spotlight on the housing backlog in the community. But it has also raised the importance of addressing housing and land issues in the Greater Mitchells Plain area – which has slipped under the media radar. This matter was brought to the fore recently when a group of Mitchells Plain residents from Woodlands met the MEC for Human Settlements and other role-players. The housing backlog in the Western Cape stands at a whopping 575 000.
Tonight we hope to unpack the burning frustrations of residents, following the mass protests by Siqalo and Mitchells Plain residents just over a week ago, which sadly claimed the life of Tauriq Mohamed from Bayview. Our objective tonight is to understand the housing crisis, the social ills facing Mitchells Plain and Siqalo, to look closely at the issues of race and identity as well as government’s failure in addressing the housing and land challenges since 1994.
Our guests this evening:
INSTUDIO:
-Faadiel Adams from Gatvol Capetonian, a newly launched organisation – the name says it all
-Gamieldien Titus from the People’s Rights Party
-Shaheen Van Nelson, chairperson New Woodlands Residents Association
-Rashmia Lucas
Position: chairperson of the Colorado London Village Ratepayers Association (COLV)
-Monwabisa Futshalana, a representative for the Siqalo community
-After 8pm, we will speak to Councillor Elton Jansen and Norman Jantjies from the Mitchells Plain United Residents Association (MURA)
02
MAY

The challenges of the D6 project

Still keeping with the issue of land reform, tonight we pick up on the challenges of restitution post 1994 by looking at the contentious District Six project.
District Six has existed as a white elephant for some time now. From the highway going in and out of the city, commuters can see some development in the form of white houses, but by-and-large, you still see the swathes of land which remains untouched. Then further up, close to Cape Tech, there is phase 3, which has taken years to complete. (and as you know, we keep regular tabs on this development, in Burning Issue on a monthly basis)
Last week, our news team reported that the District Six Working Committee (D6WC) is taking the state to court for its delays on District Six. The application in main seeks a declaratory order and structural interdict against the state for failing to provide adequate restitution in District Six.
The minister of Rural Development and Land Reform, Commission on Restitution of Land Rights, the premier of the Western Cape, the City of Cape Town, the government of the South Africa and the District Six Beneficiary and Development Trust and its trustees are cited as co- respondents in the matter.
So tonight, we want to understand what has gone wrong? And why?
23
APR

Can land reform re-write the wrongs of the past?

Land issues are being debated intensely and as we know, Expropriation of land without compensation is the government’s new agenda. There are a number of interesting new developments: a pending Restitution Amendment Act at present invalidated by the Constitutional Court; the High-Level Panel report to parliament; a new Communal Tenure Bill; and a land audit by AgriSA.
While acknowledging the huge historical inequalities in land ownership, which has been skewed along racial lines in South Africa, the general belief is that land reform programmes should seek to right past wrongs through negotiation supported by comprehensive plans, in order to support inclusive economic development and prevent racial divisions.
Now recently the Nelson Mandela Foundation a workshop on land reform which saw 26 participants including land reform and constitutional law experts engage robustly on the issue. Our question tonight: Can land reform re-write the wrongs of the past?
Two of my guests were part of this dialogue: Instudio we have:
Shahied Ajam , District Six working committee chairperson
Fareda Moosa, from the District Six reference group
To add to the discussion tonight, we have attorney Ashraf Mahomed, for a legal perspective on land reform. He joins us on the line.
Ashraf Mahomed, is the Managing Director and Founder of Ashraf Mahomed attorneys. He has extensive experience and expertise in the areas of constitutional and human rights law, land rights law and alternative dispute resolution
09
APR

Does halal certification discriminate against other religious groups?

Now something that got quite a few of our listeners riled up last week was this issue of Christian consumers complaining over the so-called religious tax on halal certified products. Last week, we reported that the Commission for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Cultural, Religious and Linguistic Communities (CRL) Commission has been flooded with letters from Christians complaining about the prevalence of halal certified food and beverages in well-known supermarkets. One of the groups we spoke to is the Christian Democratic Party who feels that the cost of halal certification is being passed on to all consumers and that this is an unfair and discriminatory practice. Of course, there were other claims that the halal industry makes R45 billion a year, some of which is spent on building mosques or paying for Islamic ‘clergy’. The CDP for one, feels this would amount to blatant discrimination against the Christian community as the same privileges are not afforded them.
Well that’s the question we asking tonight: Does halal certification discriminate against other religious groups?
Guests: Sheikh Thaafir Najaar - Islamic Council of South Africa (ICSA) director & Shaykh Achmat Sedick, director of the MJC halal trust
26
MAR

Are our police failing domestic violence victims?

Last week the Mitchells Plain Impact Association took to the streets of Cape Town demanding better police services. Among the protesters were victims and survivors of domestic violence. Dozens of residents, mainly women and children, marched from Tafelsig to Mitchells Plain Police Station with placards and posters demanding better services at the station. Their concerns include policemen not responding to calls of domestic violence and not protecting the community. The claim is that police are not taking domestic violence cases seriously.

The latest statistics from the South Africa Medical Research Council (MRC) highlight that an estimated two in five men (40%) assault their partners, and that three women in South Africa are killed by their intimate partner every day.

Are our police failing domestic violence victims? Well that’s the question we ask in tonight’s Burning Issue
12
MAR

Who is monitoring and testing mechanically deboned meat (MDM) imported to SA?

Now one of the biggest stories this past week has been the listeriosis outbreak and the recall of processed meat products from Enterprise and Rainbow chicken plants. Of course last Sunday the health minister announced that months of scientific medical research had traced the source of listeriosis to processed meat products from these two companies. South Africa has the world's worst listeria outbreak, which has killed 180 people in the past year. Over the weekend, it was reported that South African human rights attorney Richard Spoor and U.S. lawyer Bill Marler would file a class action suit against Tiger Brands, the owners of Enterprise meats. Burning Issue spoke to MJCHT Shaykh Achmat Sedick and SANHA's Theological Director Maulana MS Navlakhi
06
MAR

Imam Fasiegh Adams responds

Following VOC’s coverage of recent concerns within the local umrah industry, we were alerted to two families, the Anthony’s and the Patel’s, who were left stranded only days before they were scheduled to perform the spiritual journey. While the Anthony’s have requested that their story not be told at this time, Naeem Patel says that he paid Umrah Connect International R60,000 to secure the booking for his wife, Luthfiyah, and their two children. But, was later informed that since their vaccination cards were not handed over with their passports their visas could not be issued. VOC reporter, Thakira Desai, recently sat down with the co-founder and spiritual leader of Umrah Connect International, Imam fasiegh Adams and here is what he had to say.

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