Kaya Biz

KAYA 959  |  Podcast , ±11 min episodes every 14 hours  |  Broadcast schedule  | 
At the helm of Gauteng’s biggest business radio show, Kaya Biz, is Gugulethu who will be leading the conversation on what is next for the Afropolitan business landscape. The show presents local and international business news, entrepreneurship, corporate and investment banking. Since its inception in May 2006 Kaya Biz has grown from a half-an-hour daily finance update to an hour show bringing compelling business news and market reviews to listeners.

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31
JAN
1pm

ITS MY HOUSE: Is Estate Living Worth It? Or Are We Just Paying For Status?

Lebogang Lebepe – Founder & CEO of BizzHouse talks about Which is the better investment: sectional title or freehold ownership?

Freeholds generally are a good choice for people looking to invest in property as a long term investment strategy and sectional titles generally are a good choice for those who want to build a rental portfolio to generate a steady stream of income. Freeholds generally have a higher house price inflation rate than sectional titles do, which means that a freehold is more likely to show greater appreciation in value over time than a sectional title might show. Every situation is different though. Investing in property is always a good idea, so these legalities depend on what you need from your real estate.

Estate living doesn't always mean lower insurance premiums

Buying within security estates can give buyers the freedom to choose not to live behind bars. Guarded by an external wall and regular security patrols, homeowners often don’t see the need to install extra security measures like burglar bars and alarm systems on homes within gated communities. But, are these security estates secure enough for your insurance provider?

According to Adrian Goslett, Regional Director and CEO of RE/MAX of Southern Africa, buyers should not assume that their insurance premium will automatically be lower simply because they have moved to a security estate.

Sectional title versus freehold property

Sectional title refers to the ownership of a unit that forms part of a group-owned complex or development.
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31
JAN
1pm

Why Do Most Parents Find It Hard To Have The “Inheritance’’ Talk With Their Kids

Eunice Sibiya - Educator & Coach on Personal Financial management and Ayanda Tetyana – Parenting expert talks about Family members need to talk about potential changes in health, inheritance, and estate planning issues before there is a crisis or someone is not able to communicate. But families fail to start these important conversations. Communicating and advance planning can reduce feelings of burden, guilt, and misunderstandings. It can also reduce conflict that is often experienced when family members are put in the position of making decisions for others.

So why don't we talk?

Denial of our own or other's mortality is often the reason conversations about inheritance can be so sensitive. Few people want to give the impression that a family member might die or that they would want someone to die. Talking about human losses or changes in health can be emotional. It can also be filled with legal and financial complexities that many find overwhelming. A family history of conflict can make it difficult to talk about later life transitions of aging parents.

Helping family members talk about issues that they normally do not want to address is the focus of my research on inheritance issues. This research has been used to develop tools to help families begin thoughtful communication about the inheritance issue of personal possessions.
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31
JAN
1pm

TECH & INNOVATION: There’s No Such Thing As ‘Township Tech’

Wesley Diphoko is the Editor-In-Chief of FastCompany (SA) magazine talks about A few years ago, a technology incubator in Cape Town decided to establish a version of itself in a township based on pressure to advance transformation in the technology sector and potential to access funding.



This incubator became just another entrepreneurship programme and office space for all kinds of businesses and less about advancing technology in a township environment.





Lately, it has (together with other so called tech startup organisations), coined the term “township tech”, to potentially access funding targeted for tech projects designed to serve township communities.



How do you even begin to term a part of tech as just tech for a certain sector of society? It is disrespectful to single out tech-solving township challenges as “township tech” as if it's different from solving the same issues for the country, continent and the world.



Here’s why such a term is problematic.

Firstly, it limits the ability of a startup labelled as township tech to grow and access funding from investors. Which investor in his right mind will invest seriously in a startup that is labelled “township tech”?

Whoever coined this may have done so with good intentions, but unfortunately the unintended consequences will not do justice to young people in townships solving real challenges in society.



The truth of the matter is that there’s no such thing called township tech in the same way that there’s no “yuppie tech”.


What we have are edu tech, health tech, fintech startups that are solving education, health and financial challenges in the township environment.

A health or education challenge in a township may have minor differences with a similar challenge elsewhere, but it is still a health or education issue. To categorise health solutions with a health tech label irrespective of where they occur is the correct way.

Economic development practitioners should be careful of marginalising people and entrepreneurs around historical terms in the interest of accessing short term funding.

Technological innovations coming out of townships should be categorised correctly to receive global recognition and support. Local townships should be considered hotbeds of innovation.
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31
JAN
1pm

National State Of Disaster Over Energy Crisis On The Cards

Ted Blom - Energy Expert talks about The ANC and its alliance partners have recommended that a national state of disaster be declared over the energy crisis to ensure that sufficient financial resources are allocated to end load-shedding.

This would be similar to the state of disaster declared by the government during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic when a handful of men and women in the national coronavirus command council wielded sweeping powers that included dipping into departmental budgets to provide a soft landing for pandemic-hit businesses and individuals.

The recommendation follows calls by, among others, small businesses, the DA, the National Planning Commission, and the agriculture sector, who have said a state of disaster would give the government wide-ranging powers to intervene in the nation’s worsening energy crisis.

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Speaking on the final day of the ANC lekgotla on Monday, President Cyril Ramaphosa said work was under way in the government to ascertain whether the requirements for the declaration of the state of disaster could be met.

The possible declaration will be discussed at Wednesday’s cabinet lekgotla, he said.

“It was observed that it would be necessary to have a national disaster because that would enable us to have the instruments that would be necessary to fully address the challenge that our nation faces,” Ramaphosa told delegates during his closing address at the lekgotla.



“This lekgotla has agreed that the co-ordination of our response also needs to be escalated to the most senior levels of government and that we need to communicate more clearly and the message should be a singular message so that there is no confusion among our people.”

The recommendation from the ANC, Cosatu and SACP comes about six months after Ramaphosa rejected the idea in favour of the so-called energy action plan, the biggest feature of which was to open the door wide open for private sector energy generation.
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31
JAN
1pm

Consumers Spent Most Money On Groceries, Entertainment, Fuel And Food In Dec

Elize Kruger – Independent Analyst talks about The total spending by South African consumers in December reached R100-billion, while the volume of transactions reached 142-million, with 45-million transactions conducted at grocery stores and supermarkets, 12.8-million transactions at fuel service stations, eight-million at eateries and restaurants and 7.5-million at fast-food outlets.

However, in terms of value, consumers spent R26-billion at grocery stores and supermarkets, and spent R11.7-billion on betting, including lottery tickets, casino gambling and off-track betting. Consumers spent R9.2-billion at fuel service stations and R3.5-billion was spent at non-financial institutions, such as for foreign currency exchange and money orders, while consumers spent R3.1-billion at family clothing stores during December.

Payment clearing and reconciliation services company BankservAfrica’s Points-of-Sales transactional data showed how the spend varied among cost-conscious consumers, said BankservAfrica head of customer relations Solly Bellingan.


“Following the challenging year for the economy and households, our data show the total value of spending was only 7% higher than during the previous year, while the volumes had grown by 17%,” he noted.

Additionally, the amount of cash circulating in South Africa totalled R84-billion in December, according to BankservAfrica’s Integrated Cash Management Service data, which reflects the combined total of physical cash orders by commercial banks for their respective automatic teller machines and branch networks.

Despite the 6% decline in cash orders from the R89-billion in December, owing to the 19 working days in December 2022 compared to the 21 in December 2021, cash remained in high demand.

“One of the peak days was December 15, ahead of the Day of Reconciliation, with cash orders to the value of R8-billion placed. Further, cash orders worth R7.9-billion occurred on December 23, during the Christmas shopping rush,” said Bellingan.

BankservAfrica does not process interbank card transactions for all of the banks, which means that its data show only part of the fuller picture of the December transaction volumes and values. Further, the company does not monitor any transactions that take place between accounts at the same bank, he noted
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31
JAN
1pm

Outsmart The Taxman By Making The Most Of Tax Season

Rita Cool, certified financial planner at Alexforbes talks about The start of the new year brings ‘tax season’ upon us – a good time to review your financial situation and use any available tax benefits before the end of the tax year on 28 February.



You have until this date to make additional contributions towards a retirement fund, a retirement annuity (RA) or a tax-free savings account (TFSA) to get the benefit in time for your next tax submission. The South African Revenue Service offers generous tax deductions when you make contributions to your RA, pension or provident fund. This means you can save more for retirement, and at the same time, pay less tax. 



You can make contributions of up to 27.5% of your total taxable income, up to a maximum of R350 000 per year, and get the tax back. On a contribution of R100 000, if your tax rate is 30% this means that you get R30 000 back in tax and it only reduces your take-home income with R70 000.



There is no tax on growth in a retirement fund or a TFSA. This has a big effect on the long-term compounding of your investments compared to an after-tax investment, where you have to pay tax on growth as well. If you combine the tax-free growth with the tax benefits on the contributions you get money that works for you, not only you working for your money.
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30
JAN
1pm

Only a Third Of SA Adults Have Matric: Here's How We Can Change This.

Phemelo Segoe - Marketing Manager at Optimi Workplace talks about The matric pass rate says a lot about the health of South Africa’s education system. As an indication of the learners who successfully pass Grade 12, it offers insight into whether primary and secondary institutions are serving the needs of their learners, and provides an indication of the number of new graduates who may apply for tertiary studies or enter the job market. This figure doesn’t tell the full story, however.

On 20 January, the Department of Basic Education will announce the results of the matric class of 2022. Whether these figures point to a recovery in the wake of the pandemic remains to be seen. Between 2019 and 2020, the pass rate fell by over 5% to 76.2%, and its gains in 2021, by a mere 0.2% percentage points, were so small as to be virtually insignificant.

What’s more, researchers feel that the pass rate alone doesn’t reflect the full status of education in South Africa. The “true matric pass rate”, they argue, has to consider the dropout rate. How many learners who started in Grade 1 failed to matriculate 12 years later? The Department of Basic Education puts the dropout rate at between 42 and 56%. The Zero Dropout Campaign puts it closer to 63%, estimating that only 37% of Grade 1 learners ultimately pass Grade 12.

In 2020, the Department of Higher Education and Training calculated that less than a third of South African adults, some 32.5%, had a matric certificate or its equivalent.

With a matric still serving as the most important qualification for job seekers, these numbers paint an alarming picture. They point to the many millions of South Africans who cannot find employment — the country continues to have one of the highest unemployment rates in the world — and who cannot break intergenerational cycles of poverty. 

How can we overcome this? How can we support not only the learners who don’t pass in 2022, but also those who didn’t pass in 2021, in 2020, and the many years that came before?

The answer to this question isn’t an easy one. Pointing fingers in any one direction is reductive and counterproductive. In a country like South Africa, which is beset by many complex socio-economic and political issues, it’s best to view responsibility for addressing these problems as shared. Government has its role to play, yes, but so too does civil society and the private sector.

If we look to business, it’s clear that there are a variety of advantages available for companies that make the effort to support new and future employees who don’t have a matric. One of the most obvious of these relates to the B-BBEE Scorecard. 

Businesses that offer skills development programmes for low skilled employees and unemployed community members stand to earn up to 25 points towards their B-BBEE Scorecard. Companies with more than R50 million turnover need to spend 6% of their payroll on skills development to qualify.
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30
JAN
1pm

Questions To Ask When Close Friends And Family Don’t Support Your Business.

Leroy tau, businessman, author and relationship coach talks about When you’re in the throws of being soooo excited about your shiny new business and the new life you’re creating for yourself it’s easy to assume that your friends and loved ones will be super happy for you and super supportive.  

But what if they’re not?



Sometimes the reality can be very different.  

In fact, a lot of the time it’s different, it’s a really common issue for people and it can really start to hold you back.  It can make you feel ‘wrong’ in some way and question what you’re doing.

THEY JUST DON’T SEEM BOTHERED?!

You’ll want to talk to your closest friends about your new venture but they seem completely disinterested in it…but also very frustrated when you don’t have time to meet them, or you have a deadline to hit and you have to get it done at the weekend and they just don’t ‘get it when you can’t come out to play’. It can feel REALLY disheartening.

We expect our closest people to be our biggest supporters so it’s unsurprising that it feels really rubbish when that doesn’t happen.
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30
JAN
1pm

Huge Fines For JSE-listed Firms That Ignore Employment Equity Targets

Adv Fikiswa Mncanca- Bede - Chief Director Statutory and Advocacy Services in the Labour Dept talks about JSE-listed companies will be slapped with a minimum penalty of R1.5m if found to not be complaint with employment equity targets, an official of the department of employment and labour has said.

Fikiswa Mncanca-Bede, the department’s chief director for statutory and advocacy services, told businesses and employment consultants on Friday that the department would be revisiting JSE-listed companies during the first quarter of the year to monitor compliance with the Employment Equity Act five years after approving their plans...
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30
JAN
1pm

SME financing 101: Knowing Your Options Is Key To Survival

Jeremy Lang - Chief Investment Officer at Business Partners Limited talks about With the recent increase in the interest rate, finance has become less affordable for many small and medium enterprises (SMEs) however Jeremy Lang, Chief Investment Officer at Business Partners Limited, urges business owners to be realistic about their expectations and plans for the year ahead, but not to give up hope as there are many different funders in South Africa. “While the situation may seem bleak and we still have a long road to recovery, I implore SMEs who might be tempted to throw in the towel to reconsider their financing options.”



New institutions and types of financing are introduced each year, and there is a whole host of financing products available from the private and public sector. This financing mainly consists of grants, risk free and risk-based finance where either grants, debt or equity investments are made available.



Financiers include commercial institutions such as banks and SME focused financing institutions, development finance institutions, angel investors, crowd funding, enterprise development funding and private equity firms, amongst others. They may also relief programmes specifically designed to help SMEs weather the COVID-19 and most recently, the electricity load shedding.
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30
JAN
1pm

CAREER’S CORNER: How To Identify When You’re The ‘Toxic’ Co-worker At Work

Phiona Martin - award-winning Organizational Psychologist, Career Coach talks about Signs of a toxic coworker

None of these though compare to the person who wreaks havoc on you and everyone around you. They spend their daily work lives doing things that never have a positive outcome and make you wish it was the end of the day when you just got there with your breakfast in tote. I am talking about the ever so present toxic co-worker. 

Face it: some of you out there are the textbook definition of this type of employee. You may not know it, or do and deny it, but there are key signs attributed to the behavior that earns you this unglamorous honor.

They create a space that’s either not fun to be around or is repeatedly doing things that brings the rest of your staff down in the process. 

Worst of all is that this person will claw their way to a promotion over you and you may not even know it. Ways that they do this range from manipulation to starting drama with others to even being a likable yet not suitable person for the job. 

And yes, this person can still be that frustrating even in a virtual setting that many of us remain in due to the coronavirus pandemic. The tricks they have up their sleeve go beyond the physical presence, it’s just up to you to figure out what their work style is.
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25
JAN
1pm

Why we need a culture change for our TVET colleges to work?

Hendrick Makaneta - Education activist talks about TVET today, there is the constant challenge that very little research has been done on the relationship between skills development and culture.



How do we go about developing systems that fit into the country’s culture, values, traditions and social interaction as well as its particular level of development?

Timing is everything. In the past, development banks and donors have funded a range of interventions that mimicked the “best practice” of the countries of origin of the consultants that were hired. But many have not taken off… or the take off was so cumbersome and protracted that it was clear the plane was not well designed… or fit for purpose. Why?


What do people think about TVET? Is it better to have an unemployed lawyer as a son than an employed construction supervisor? Is it better to have an daughter earning almost nothing as a teacher or working for international wages in a factory as a electronics technician?


Industry is not the agent of change setting the future scenarios as we often think it is. Industry if they are successful, exploits very well what people at a particular moment prefer, what they want to associate themselves with, what they value and consider important in their lives. Industry pays millions to have this kind of researches.
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