Woman's Hour: Daily Podcasts

BBC  |  Podcast , ±39 min episodes every day  | 
Woman's Hour brings you the big celebrity names and leading women in the news, with subjects ranging widely from politics to health, law, education, arts, parenting, relationships, work, fiction, food and fashion. Presented by Jenni Murray and Jane Garvey. Find out more at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/womanshour

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28
JAN

Goop Lab and the psychology of wellness, Tolson judgement, French #MeToo, Emma Jane Unsworth

Last Friday, Gwyneth Paltrow launched her new TV series ‘Goop Lab’ on Netflix. It explores everything from reducing your biological age to having the best female orgasms and healing yourself with energy. But where’s the line between fact and fiction when it comes to wellness? What draws people in to trying the vast and bizarre range of creams and contraptions on offer? And what is it about our psychology that means it rarely matters whether the claims are backed up by science? Jane is joined by cognitive neuroscientist Prof Tali Sharot, consultant dermatologist Dr Anjali Mahto and self-confessed beauty product obsessive, Ree.

In France there’s a debate going on about very young people having affairs with older, more powerful men - something that used to be deemed acceptable in some intellectual circles. It’s because a woman called Vanessa Springora – a leading French publisher – makes allegations in a book which came out this month, that she was groomed when she was 14 by a much admired author who was 50. Anne-Elizabeth Moutet a French journalist, explains what’s happens and why it’s significant.

Last week a written judgement was published in the family division of the High Court. Ms Justice Russell ruled in favour of a woman seeking a fresh hearing in the family courts. Her child custody case had originally been handled by a senior judge, Judge Tolson. In the course of his fact finding he ruled that the woman had not been raped by her former partner because she had “taken no physical steps” to stop him. The appeal judgement criticised him for his outdated ideas of what constitutes consent. It also recommended that family court judges who regularly deal with allegations of sexual assault and domestic violence should be required to undergo training to the same level as judges trying these charges in criminal courts. Jane discusses the significance of this judgement and what needs to happen next with Jenny Beck, Director of Beck Fitzgerald solicitors, a specialist family law firm and Louise Tickle, a journalist who specialises in social affairs and family law

Jane talks to the award winning novelist and screen writer Emma Jane Unsworth about her new novel 'Adults' – about friendship, family, love and what it means to be an adult.

Presenter - Jane Garvey
Producer - Anna Lacey
Guest - Tali Sharot
Guest - Anjali Mahto
Guest - Anne-Marie Lodge
Guest - Jenny Beck
Guest - Louise Tickle
Guest - Emma Jane ...
27
JAN

Breaking Relationship Patterns, Taking up Boxing at Fifty

Aged fifty Marion Dunn joined a boxing gym. The fitness training proved incredibly hard but Marion soon became addicted to it and to learning how to punch with the best of them. She explains to Jane why she thinks boxing is such a wonderful activity.

When you look back over your relationships do you see patterns? In the third in a series the story of a woman we are calling Katy who feels that her earliest experiences shaped what she looked for and needed from her partners.

Zakiya Mckenzie, a writer from Bristol, talks to Jane about spending a year as Forestry England's writer in residence and her attempts to make the green movement more black.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Interviewed guest: Marion Dunn
Interviewed guest: Zakiya Mckenzie
Reporter: Millie Chowles
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore
24
JAN

Lorna Cooper, Sarah Champion, Jane Sanderson

Lorna Cooper says she feeds her family of four on £20 a week. She's cut it down from £100. She offers her best tips for planning meals and stretching your grocery money.

Churches, mosques and gurdwaras should be safe places for teenagers. Yet due to a loophole in the law adults in faith settings can have sexual relationships with 16 and 17 years old who are under their supervision. This would be illegal if it happened in a school. The MP Sarah Champion is leading a cross-party group of MPs looking into how teenagers can be better protected in faith settings and how this legal loophole can be closed.

Why is the idea of connecting with past lovers so powerful? A new novel called Mix Tape by Jane Sanderson explores the power of music to bring soulmates back together.

Radio 4 has a drama tomorrow which is about the famous novel, The Well of Loneliness. The drama is set in 1928 and is about the obscenity trial that led to the banning of the book. Written by Radclyffe Hall, the novel's about a love affair between two women. Shelley Silas is the writer of the Radio 4 drama and joins Jane to talk all about it.
21
JAN

Modest Fashion, Behind the Unemployment Figures, the Art of Listening

The Office for National Statistics release new unemployment figures today. We look behind the numbers and ask what sorts of jobs women are losing and what’s being done to save them. What do we know about the jobs that women are employed in? And have efforts to help women get into better paid sectors changed the gender pay gap?

Do you know what “modest fashion” is? It’s about wearing less revealing clothes, and if you’ve a religious faith which emphasises modesty, it’s a style which allows you to do just that and look great. Well-known high-street shops and on-line brands (like M&S and ASOS) sell clothes under this banner, appealing to a more diverse range of customers. But is it really just a new way of describing how many of us prefer to dress, especially as we get older? Reina Lewis from London College of Fashion together with Amina Begum Ali who’s a model, discuss how it fits into the UK’s £32 billion fashion industry.

When you look back over your relationships do you see patterns? Our reporter Milly Chowles does and she wants to understand why this might be. In a new series about toxic relationships she talks to four women who have broken free. Today, a woman we are calling Nina who was drawn to bad boys.

Writer Kate Murphy claims that as a society we’ve forgotten how to listen. She joins Jane to talk about what stops us & to argue the case for better listening.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Interviewed guest: Vicky Pryce
Interviewed guest: Amina Begum Ali
Interviewed guest: Reina Lewis
Interviewed guest: Kate Murphy
Reporter: Milly Chowles
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore
20
JAN

PHONE-IN - Would you stop having kids to save the planet?

The population of Earth has doubled since 1970 and is heading for 10 billion by 2050. That’s a lot of extra strain on the planet. Could having fewer kids be the answer? Jane Garvey wants to hear your thoughts!

Would you consider having fewer kids for the greater good? Have you or someone you know decided to live a child-free life? Is Harry and Meghan’s choice to stop at two the ideal compromise? Are you someone who couldn’t ignore the urge for a third? Or is it over-consumption rather than over-population that’s the real issue?

Call 03700 100 444 or email us via the Woman's Hour website. Lines open from 0830
18
JAN

Maggie Oliver, Music from the Alison Rayner Quintet & Mixed Weight Dating

Maggie Oliver, the former detective and whistleblower who exposed Greater Manchester Police’s poor handling of the sexual abuse of young girls in Rochdale, talks about the publication of the first part of an independent review into failures in the Investigation of the sexual grooming of children. She tells us why she thinks girls are continuing to be abused today.

A mother tells us about her daughter being able to access around 30 cosmetic procedures despite being under the age of 18. Caroline Payne a plastic and reconstructive surgeon discusses how and why this might happen.

We have music Alison Rayner Quintet.

We discuss the term ‘Mixed Weight Dating, used to describe a couple with a noticeable difference in body size or shape, with Steph Yeboah a plus size and body positive lifestyle blogger and Ebony Douglas the CEO of her own marketing and PR agency.

We hear from the heads of the UK’s only two women’s housing associations Zaiba Qureshi the Chief Executive of Housing for Women and Denise Fowler the Chief Executive of Women’s Pioneer Housing. How have women’s housing needs changed since the organisations were set up?

Presented by: Jenni Murray
Produced by: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Lucinda Montefiore
16
JAN

Parenting: Why do children lie?

Young children may know they can deceive others but their first lies are often more humorous than effective. Imagine the child who claims not to have eaten any cake while her mouth is still full, or who blames the family dog for drawing on the wall. But is lying actually an important sign other cognitive skills are also developing? As a child matures how does the nature and motivation behind lying change? And is it ever a cause for concern? In this week's Woman's Hour Parenting Podcast, Jenni Murray speaks to consultant child and educational psychologist, Laverne Antrobus.
16
JAN

Maggie Oliver, Alison Rayner Quintet, the history of the breast, and shortbread

A report on child sexual exploitation in Greater Manchester says police and social workers were aware and failed to protect victims fifteen years ago. We hear from Maggie Oliver, the former detective who blew the whistle on the failure to tackle grooming gangs in Rochdale, why she thinks little has changed in that time and why prosecutions must follow.

When she turned 60, bass player Alison Rayner formed a jazz band. She also set up Blow the Fuse, an organisation to support women musicians. Alison talks about her choice of instrument, why it’s never too late to take up music and the reaction she gets from her audience.

Professor Joanna Bourke looks at the history of ideas about the breast from beauty to age and function to sexual pleasure. She also discusses what happens when we turn our attention to the male breast.

And, in Flora Shedden’s new book Aran, each chapter follows a day in the life of the bakery of the same name which is located below the highlands of Scotland. She joins Jenni in the studio with Granny Joan’s and Angus’ shortbread.

Presenter: Jenni Murry
Producer: Ruth Watts
15
JAN

Stormont Women, A Friend's Death, Mixed-Weight Dating

You might have seen a striking picture this week of the two top women in Northern Ireland facing four men in suits. The women are the First Minister, Arlene Foster from the DUP and Deputy First Minister, Michelle O’Neill from Sinn Fein. The new Assembly has more female politicians that ever, so what does this say about how Northern Ireland is changing?

New books and apps help you track your periods and find out when you're on top form and when you're not. But it is true that we can work our life around your hormones if we understand our cycle? Jenni's joined by Dr Emma Ross, Head of Physiology at the English Institute of Sport and Maisie Hill, author of Period Power.

Is mourning a friend different from mourning for someone in the family? You're expected to be very sad when a family member dies but grieving for a friend can be seen as ‘too much’. It can also be complicated, especially if you knew them in a different way to how their family did. When friends of our own age die it can bring up all sorts of tricky emotions. Sue Elliott-Nicholls, who knows what it's like to grieve for friends and family, reports.

‘Mixed-weight dating’ is a term used to describe a couple with a noticeable difference in body size or shape. Some people see it as a straight-forward description of the couple but others say the phrase is offensive. Steph Yeboah is a plus-size and body positive lifestyle blogger. Ebony Douglas is the CEO of her own marketing and PR agency - and has been in a relationship like this for three years.
11
JAN

Reappraising Christine Keeler, Snowplough Parents & Why women love reading fiction

What impact did the Profumo Affair have on the woman at its centre Christine Keeler? We hear an interview she did with Jenni in 2001 and Baroness Joan Bakewell and Professor Kate Williams discuss the attitudes to Christine Keeler at the time and how they have changed now.

We hear why women are at particular risk when it comes to experiencing a concussion. We hear from Dr Willie Stewart the Head of Glasgow Brain Indury Research Group and from Samantha Ainsworth who has post-concussion syndrome.

Professor Helen Taylor tells us why women are the main readers of fiction.

The government’s official advisers on youth justice are calling for a full review of the age of criminal responsibility. We hear why there are calls for it to be raised from ten years old to twelve. Dr Eileen Vizard a consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist and Louise King the Director of Policy and Campaigns for Just for Kids Law.

Are you a snowplough parent? Are you guilty of doing your child’s homework so that they don’t experience failure? Rebecca Glover is the Principal of Surbiton High School and Dr Angharad Rudkin is a child psychologist discuss.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Karen Dalziel
09
JAN

Reappraising Christine Keeler, Leah Penniman, Alice Guy Blache

BBC One drama series The Trial of Christine Keeler is an imaginative reappraisal of the 1960s scandal known as the Profumo Affair. It's told from her perspective and the impact a series of powerful men had on the teenage girl. We hear archive of Christine Keeler talking to Woman’s Hour in 2001. And, Baroness Joan Bakewell and Professor Kate Williams discuss attitudes to Keeler at the time and changes in sexual politics since 1963.

New research out today reveals that women in the UK have much poorer sexual health than men. But many of the groups identified in the study – including those with sexual dysfunction and low desire - are often being missed by existing sexual health services. We look at what's happening and why.

Fifteen per cent of UK farmers are women. When it comes to Black or ethnic minority farmers, numbers are hard to pin down - and it seems there’s a similar lack of diversity in farming and food production in America. Leah Penniman is a Black woman who describes herself as an activist farmer. She opened a community farm called Soul Fire Farm in New York State, aiming to provide better quality food for people on low incomes. She talks about her new book, Farming While Black.

Alice Guy-Blache was a pioneering French filmmaker. In 1896 she wrote, produced and directed one of the first narrative films ever made. She created more than 1,000 films during her 20-year career and ran her own studio, yet her contribution to the birth of cinema has largely been largely forgotten. Pamela B Green spent 8 years researching her story, resulting in the documentary film ‘Be Natural’, and joins us to discuss her work.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Ruth Watts
09
JAN

Reappraising Christine Keeler, Leah Penniman, Alice Guy Blache

BBC One drama series The Trial of Christine Keeler is an imaginative reappraisal of the 1960s scandal known as the Profumo Affair. It's told from her perspective and the impact a series of powerful men had on the teenage girl. We hear archive of Christine Keeler talking to Woman’s Hour in 2001. And, Baroness Joan Bakewell and Professor Kate Williams discuss attitudes to Keeler at the time and changes in sexual politics since 1963.

New research out today reveals that women in the UK have much poorer sexual health than men. But many of the groups identified in the study – including those with sexual dysfunction and low desire - are often being missed by existing sexual health services. We look at what's happening and why.

Fifteen per cent of UK farmers are women. When it comes to Black or ethnic minority farmers, numbers are hard to pin down - and it seems there’s a similar lack of diversity in farming and food production in America. Leah Penniman is a Black woman who describes herself as an activist farmer. She opened a community farm called Soul Fire Farm in New York State, aiming to provide better quality food for people on low incomes. She talks about her new book, Farming While Black.

Alice Guy-Blache was a pioneering French filmmaker. In 1896 she wrote, produced and directed one of the first narrative films ever made. She created more than 1,000 films during her 20-year career and ran her own studio, yet her contribution to the birth of cinema has largely been largely forgotten. Pamela B Green spent 8 years researching her story, resulting in the documentary film ‘Be Natural’, and joins us to discuss her work.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Ruth Watts

28 episodes

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