Woman's Hour: Daily Podcasts

BBC  |  Podcast , ±44 min episodes every 23 hours
Woman's Hour brings you the big celebrity names and leading women in the news, with subjects ranging widely from politics to health, law, education, arts, parenting, relationships, work, fiction, food and fashion. Presented by Jenni Murray and Jane Garvey. Find out more at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/womanshour
18
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7am

Rae Earl, Give Up Your Seat, Leomie Anderson

My Mad Fat Diary, a drama on Channel 4 and E4, is based on the real-life diaries of Rae Earl. She's got a new book out called It's All In Your Head about anxiety, eating disorders, OCD and psychosis. She talks to Jane about her own struggles with mental health and offers top tips and advice. She admits she doesn't have a psychology degree but she does have experience of life. As London Fashion Week continues, we speak to the model Leomie Anderson about diversity within the fashion industry. Last year at New York Fashion Week she criticised make-up artists for being unprepared to work with models of colour. She joins Jane to discuss female empowerment within the fashion industry, body image and her own fashion and feminist platform LAPP. A group of women in Liverpool is urging the city council to put some women on its most important decision-making body: the City Region Cabinet. At the moment it's an all-male affair. Spear-headed by business woman, Fiona Armstrong Gibbs, they've formed the Give Up Your Seat campaign. This aims to persuade some of the men on the cabinet to give up their seats so women can take their place. We hear from Fiona about her campaign, but we also talk about gender equality in local politics in general. Recent research says that only a third of elected councillors in England are women. So whether it's local council committees or local elections, why is more female representation important and if more women were involved how would it make a difference?
16
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12pm

East Dunbartonshire - The Best Place to be a Woman

We'll be discussing the best place in Britain to be a woman, hearing what's important to you about where you live and from five young women in East Dunbartonshire who tell us why they think their area came top of the research. We'll also hear from Nancy Kelly the director of Policy Research at the National Centre for Social Research who crunched the numbers on our behalf and from Professor Susan Harkness, a social scientist, on the winners and losers of the list. And Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, former Spice Girl Geri Horner and comedian Shazia Mirza tell us how their hometown has shaped them.We have music from the classical pianist Beatrice Rana.And as parents get ready to pack their children off to university this weekend we hear from mother and daughter Nikki and Emily Woolf on the emotional impact of this milestone and from Lucy Tobin author of A Guide to Uni Life.We hear from journalist and author Chris Hemmings on what it means to 'Be A Man'. The former 'lad' explores how masculine determination to be dominant not only impacts on the women and girls but also on the men and boys too. Kate Millett whose 1970 book Sexual Politics became a keystone of second wave feminism has died at the age of 82. We discuss her legacy with crime writer Val McDermid, Ettie Bailey-King of The School's Consent Project and historian Professor Mary BeardPicture Credit: East Dunbartonshire Council.
15
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6am

Author Siri Hustvedt

George Osborne told colleagues at the Evening Standard newspaper that he would not rest until Theresa May was "chopped up in bags in my freezer", that's according to a magazine profile of the former chancellor. It would not be the first time he has used gruesome language about the Prime Minister, who sacked him when she succeeded David Cameron after the EU referendum. We discuss the use of violent language, its motive and impact, with Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor of The Spectator and Rachel Krys, Co-Director of End Violence Against Women. US novelist Siri Hustvedt is the prizewinning author of six novels and writer of non-fiction, poetry and essays. She also publishes in scientific journals on neurology and psychiatry and is therefore well placed to bridge the art science divide, which she does in a new collection of essays, A Woman Looking At Men Looking At Women. In it she considers how perception and bias works against women; how science can be judged masculine and the imaginative arts and the emotions feminine and therefore less important. She talks to Jenni about this and the influence of misogyny on the US election.Should you volunteer to work in an orphanage in a poor country? Last week we discussed how Australia is considering taking a hard line on orphanages abroad, and refusing to support them. That's because they believe it risks putting more children in orphanages and fuels a kind of "orphanage industry". Currently, the received wisdom about this issue is that you shouldn't volunteer unless you have a specific skill or profession to offer, and our guests last time were very clear about that. But some listeners got in touch to say they volunteer abroad in a responsible way, and others wanted to let us know about children centres abroad which are run very responsibly, in their opinion. Journalist, broadcaster, author and former 'lad' Chris Hemmings used to be involved in disgraceful rugby club antics while at university, from throwing full pints in women's faces to some of his team mates urinating on women. Now a reformed character, in his book 'Be A Man' Chris explains why he did it, and attempts to discover what in 2017 it really means to 'Be A Man'. Why have generations of men blocked women's march towards equality and what impact has it had? Chris joins Jenni to explore how masculine determination to be dominant not ...
14
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8am

Jenni Murray's 30 years of presenting Woman's Hour; Classical piano, Starting university

30 years since Jenni Murray started presenting Woman's Hour, we listen again to some archive of interviews Jenni did with a selection of political and cultural figures.Kate Millett, whose 1970 book Sexual Politics became a keystone of second-wave feminism, has died at the age of 82. She is described as a wayward artist, thinker and activist. Jenni is joined by the crime writer, Val McDermid and Ettie Bailey-King, co-organiser of The School's Consent Project to discuss Millett's legacy.How do you prepare to go to university? What do you pack, physically, how do you get ready emotionally and what is it that you might you never have considered in your wildest dreams - but you really really need to know? Jenni is joined by Lucy Tobin, author of 'A Guide to Uni Life', mum Nikki and her 18-year old daughter Emily who is preparing to go to university for the first time on Sunday. Aged 24, classical pianist Beatrice Rana, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Artists, has topped the classical album charts, and made her debut at the Hollywood Bowl and BBC Proms. She has been nominated for Gramophone Magazine's Young Artist of the Year award, one of the most prestigious music awards for young classical artists in the world. Beatrice joins Jenni to discuss her career to perform live Variation 1 from Bach's Goldberg Variations.Presenter: Jenni Murray.
13
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9am

Best Place to be a Woman : East Dunbartonshire

Jane Garvey presents the programme live from the Fort Theatre, Bishopbriggs in East Dunbartonshire. One of thirty-two council areas in Scotland, it contains many of the suburbs of Glasgow as well as many of the city's commuter towns and villages. How important is education, housing, environment and culture? We hear from pupils at Bishopbriggs Academy. Jane speaks to different women from the area. They include the singer-songwriter Amy MacDonald; Kirstin Freeman, Rector All Saints Church; cafe owner Jennifer Tait; mother and businesswoman Tracey Eker and seventy-nine year old Margaret Smith who has lived in the area for nearly sixty years. They are joined by Catriona Stewart, Reporter and columnist with The Herald and Evening Times.Picture credit: East Dunbartonshire Council.
12
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9am

Best Place to be a Woman: The Results

And the winner is...today we reveal the Best Place to be a Woman in Britain. In a special programme live from the Radio Theatre, Jane Garvey will discuss the newly crowned 'Best Place' with an audience of women from across Britain. So will city living top rural dwelling? Can the young flourish in the same locations as the old? And can community spirit ever truly compensate for a lack of facilities? The audience will react and share their experiences. How does where you live shape your life for better or worse? We speak to a group of women about the impact their upbringing had on them. Joining us is Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson one of Britain's most successful Paralympians, born and raised in Cardiff. Founder of girl power and member of one of Britain's most iconic bands, the singer Geri Horner discusses how Watford inspired her global success. The comedian Shazia Mirza is here to tell us what it was like being raised in an Asian Muslim household in Birmingham in the 1970s. And Dr Susie Mitchell, scientist and musician from Midlothian joins us. What do women value most? And why are some areas not serving women well? Jane discusses the winners and losers with Nancy Kelley from the National Centre for Social Research and Professor Susan Harkness, social scientist from the University of Essex. Presenter: Jane GarveyProducer: Sarah Hatchard.
11
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7am

Best Place to be a Woman: phone-in

What's important to you about where you live? What would make it a great place to be a woman? On Tuesday Woman's Hour reveals new analysis we commissioned to find out the best place in Britain to be a woman. Before that we'd like to hear from you.What's important to you about a place? How did you choose where to set up home; closeness to family, good jobs, housing, schools, countryside, diversity, culture? What do you love about it? Maybe the place you live, or the place you grew up, had a bad reputation, but you love it - why? Perhaps you moved somewhere because you expected it to be wonderful but hate it. Let us know.Call 03700 100 444 from 0800 on Monday. In the meantime you can tell us your views on email - remember to include a contact number if you can join us on the programme. Presenter: Jane GarveyProducer: Jane Thurlow.
08
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1pm

Weekend Woman's Hour

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week. Presented by Jane GarveyProducer: Dianne McGregorEditor: Jane Thurlow.
08
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8am

Kirstie Allsopp, Maggie O'Farrell, Nina Stemme, Sophie Willan

Kirstie Allsopp has turned her hand to cooking with her new cookbook 'Kirstie's Real Kitchen', filled with heart-warming recipes to enliven family meals and a range of ideas for entertaining. Best known for TV house-hunting and crafting, Kirstie talks to Andrea about learning to cook as you go, the backlash she often receives on social media and her love of crafting.Award winning novelist Maggie O'Farrell has written a memoir composed of seventeen brushes with death. I Am, I Am, I Am has the author speculating on vulnerability and the determination to make every moment count. Swedish opera singer Nina Stemme is widely considered the greatest dramatic soprano of our time, unsurpassed in her powerful and expressive singing of Wagnerian roles for more than a generation. She joins Andrea Catherwood to discuss her career so far and her upcoming performance leading the Last Night of the Proms, joined by the BBC Singers and BBC Symphony Chorus.Comedian Sophie Willan refuses the easy labels others might want to apply to her. She is Northern, female, a care-leaver and a former sex worker and she says real life is complicated. So, how do you make comedy out of it and why would you try? Reporter: Jac Philimore Presenter: Andrea Catherwood Producer: Erin Riley.
07
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8am

Hermione Norris, Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh

A Bill will be presented in the House of Commons today to address the issue of women born in the 1950s who are adversely affected by changes to the State Pension Age, the so called WASPI women. Carolyn Harris MP for Swansea East is Chair of the State Pension Inequality for Women All Party Parliamentary Group which is presenting the bill. She joins Andrea to talk about what they are hoping to achieve. Actor Hermione Norris is back playing Karen in series 7 of Cold Feet, twenty years after the first episode. She joins Andrea to talk about how much life has changed for her both on and off the small screen. Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh's join Andrea in the studio to Cook the Perfect...Rolled Pavlova with Peaches and Strawberries and they describe writing their new book new baking and desserts cookbook 'Sweet'.You've Got to Laugh, the second part of the series which looks at how stand-up comedians at the Edinburgh Fringe turn difficult personal experiences into comedy. Today Evelyn Mok.The Exhibition for the Woman's Hour Craft Prize in partnership with the Crafts Council and the Victoria & Albert museum opens today. Jane Garvey went for a sneak preview. Presenter: Andrea CatherwoodProducer: Caroline Donne.
06
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8am

Victoria and Abdul, Virtual reality, Lou Conran, Voting

The film 'Victoria and Abdul', starring Judi Dench tells the story of the monarch in her last decade, and the friendship she formed with a young Indian man brought to the UK to present her with a token from the empire. It is based on a book written by Shrabani Basu, who spent months uncovering 13 volumes of Victoria's journals - she tells Jane Garvey about the experience.Virtual Reality has had success with its ability to make users feel like they're stepping into games. But film-maker Jayisha Patel has created the real world of a child-trafficking victim, so that fathers can understand and empathise with what their daughters have experienced.In the first of a three part series, You've Got to Laugh, which looks at how comedians turn grim experience into comedy, comedian Lou Conran talks about discovering at her 20 week pregnancy scan that her baby would not survive outside the womb. Lou decided to raise money for a bereavement charity by writing a show about her experience and taking it to the Edinburgh Fringe. Jac Phillimore speaks to Lou about the delicate balance of finding the funny in such a sad experience and how it feels to perform. Some of you will find this an uncomfortable listen because in the piece Lou deals with the loss of her baby by using comedy. You'll hear clips from the show which feature sensitive issues, jokes and strong language, along with audio diaries recorded by Lou whilst she put the show together.
05
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8am

Parenting: What's the point of homework?

Children are heading back to school, the classroom, the playground... and homework. How much is homework a useful activity for children – and teachers – and parents? What does the research say? And do our listeners agree? Jane Garvey is joined by Professor Sue Hallam, from the Institute of Education, University College, London and Pamela Butchart, a secondary school philosophy teacher from Dundee.

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