Woman's Hour: Daily Podcasts

BBC  |  Podcast, ±43 min episodes every 23 hours
Woman's Hour brings you the big celebrity names and leading women in the news, with subjects ranging widely from politics to health, law, education, arts, parenting, relationships, work, fiction, food and fashion. Presented by Jenni Murray and Jane Garvey. Find out more at www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/womanshour
23
MAY
2am
In the light of the Manchester attacks how do we talk to children about what has happened? Nicky Cox, Editor of First News and Educational Psychologist Dr Sunny Kleo join Jane to give advice to parents, grandparents and carers about how to talk to children of different ages about the things they will be seeing on TV or on social media. And, for younger children, are there useful tips for minimising and contextualising their distress? Hilary's mother lost herself to alcohol and no one in the family ever talked about it, apart from Uncle David. He intervened and persuaded Hilary's mum to stop drinking while her daughter was doing her A levels. Reporter Jo Morris accompanied Hilary on a visit to see Uncle David, now 91, to hear her story of being the child of an alcoholic. The second in a series. Charlotte Harris has won a gold medal for her first ever Show Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show, after five years of helping other designers behind the scenes. One of only two women amongst the show garden designers on Main Avenue, she heads an all-female design team. Her garden is influenced by the forests and waterways of the Canadian Boreal, a vast breath-taking area of forested natural habitat, which stretches across Canada, Scandinavia and Siberia. Jane joins Charlotte in her show garden.Dr Tasha Eurich is a psychologist and performance coach and she'll be speaking to Jane about her new book 'Insight' which focuses on the power of self-awareness. ...
22
MAY
2am
As the general election gets nearer we take a look at childcare and ask listeners how they think childcare could be made easier, more convenient and more affordable. Anne Dudley has just been an awarded the PRS for Music Outstanding Contribution to British Music at the Ivor Novello awards, for her work as a songwriter, arranger, producer and television film composer. Her music ranges from ABC's Lexion of Love album to the soundtrack to Poldark and the film The Full Monty The launch of a new series on children of alcoholics. We asked you to get in touch if you had been affected by this subject, and many of you did. Over the series we will be hearing about some of your experiences. We start with Lynne who grew up in Yorkshire with an alcoholic mother who died twelve years ago from complications caused by her drinking. Jo Morris is the reporter.1500 applicants, 29 judges, a lot of deliberation and some amazing work... we had a fantastic array of entrants for the Woman's Hour Craft Prize but there can only be 12 finalists who will get to show at the Victoria and Albert Museum exhibition in September. Today we find out who they are.
20
MAY
2am
We discuss why Superintendent Ted Hastings in the BBC's Line of Duty is the ultimate guilty crush. Adrian Dunbar who plays Ted Hastings and the author Kathy Lette discuss the appeal of the unreconstructed male.We'll hear from the anti FGM campaigner Hibo Wardere about her recent trip to Senegal where she met communities who have abandoned the practice of FGM.The Oldham born model Karen Elson talks about her life as a singer songwriter in Nashville.We discuss the merits of school residential trips with James Wynne, Head of Science at Chesterfield School in Crosby and teacher Pamela Butchart author of children's book, There's a Werewolf in my Tent.Documentary maker Sue Bourne on her latest film talking to people who have been told they have a terminal illness. Lisa Keech talks about the difference her cancer diagnosis has made to her life.What makes someone want to go on holiday with their mother? We hear from Kate Lee who took her mum away in 2001 and 2008 when her dementia became more apparent and 24 year old Gena Mour Barrett who goes on holiday with her mum every year.And the women who made swimming possible in the 19th Century: the writer and keen swimmer Jenny Landreth on her book Swell.
19
MAY
2am
Carole Travers from Poole in Dorset is one of a number of mixed heritage children born to African-American fathers who were stationed in the UK during World War II. With their husbands away fighting the war, some women had relationships and children with them. Fiona Clampin talks to Carole who's been trying to trace her father the whole of her adult life, and to John who is still deeply affected by his early experiences.With the Election looming, we're in Sunderland talking to some women about the issue that most concern them. The South African playwright and theatre director Yael Farber discusses her new play Salome, at The National Theatre, a radical revision of the biblical tale. And the joys and pitfalls of going on holiday with your mum no matter what age you are. Presenter Jenni MurrayProducer Beverley Purcell.
18
MAY
2am
Alex Hanscombe was just two years old, going on three, when his mother Rachel Nickell was murdered on Wimbledon Common in 1992. He spoke to Andrea Catherwood about his book 'Letting Go' which describes what happened that morning and the devastating effect it had on him, his father and his extended family. The FA may increase the percentage of women on its board to 30%. Only half of the 68 Sport England and UK Sport funded national governing bodies actually meet this target. Why? Baroness Sue Campbell, Head of Women's Football at the FA and BBC Sports journalist Katie Gornall discuss possible reforms to sporting boards.Oldham-born, Nashville-based, singer-songwriter Karen Elson on her modelling career, turning to music, the influence of her previous marriage to musician Jack White and following their divorce, returning to her English roots and personal themes in her new album, Double Roses. Superintendent Ted Hastings of the BBC's Line of Duty series has been described on social media as TV's most unlikely sex symbol and a guilty crush, despite coming across as a little bit sexist. Jenni is joined by the actor Adrian Dunbar who plays Hastings and the author Kathy Lette to talk about the appeal of the unreconstructed male.
17
MAY
2am
School trips can be educational, adventurous, fun... and costly. What are the merits of getting back to basics and going camping? Or is that too much effort? James Wynne, Head of Science at Chesterfield School in Crosby, who has recently introduced his year 11s to virtual reality school outings and Pamela Butchart, author of the children’s book “There’s a Werewolf in My Tent” discuss the pros and cons of residential school trips.
17
MAY
2am
Judy Garland has become an enduring icon to millions of fans of all generations around the world. She is often perceived as a tragic figure but in a new play Judy! at the Arts Theatre in London she is portrayed and celebrated as a survivor in a man's world. The writer Ray Rackham and Belinda Woolston who takes on the role of Judy discuss her story. Belinda will also perform one of her songs live in the studio. Catharine MacKinnon is a lawyer, a radical feminist scholar, a political activist and a passionate advocate for ending inequalities and abuse in women's lives. Jenni talks to her about her new book Butterfly Politics, the coming together of forty years of her work which has been defined by the central concerns of gender inequality, putting an end to sexual harassment, rape, pornography and prostitution. School trips can be educational, adventurous, fun and costly. What are the merits of getting back to basics and going camping? Or is that too much effort? James Wynne, Head of Science at Chesterfield School in Crosby, who has recently introduced his year 11s to virtual reality school outings and Pamela Butchart, author of the children's book "There's a Werewolf in My Tent" discuss the pros and cons of residential school trips. And more from Women in One, a collection of audio snapshots in which Abigail Hollick talks to women of all ages and backgrounds about their lives. Abigail meets a woman at a bus station in Glasgow.Presenter: ...
16
MAY
2am
This week a drama based on the Rochdale sex abuse scandal is being broadcast over three consecutive nights on BBC One. It portrays the experiences of girls who were groomed in Rochdale between 2008 and 2012, for which nine men were convicted and sentenced. The drama explores how these girls were groomed, and why, despite repeated referrals from sexual health worker Sara Rowbotham, the police, social services and the CPS failed respond to the problem. The actor Maxine Peake plays Sara Rowbotham in the drama and they both join Jane to talk about it. The experience of those caring for family members who are ill is something we discuss on Woman's Hour often. In light of the Conservative manifesto pledge to give people the right to up to a year of unpaid leave to look after a relative full time while retaining rights to their job, we speak to three listeners about how they managed. Documentary maker Sue Bourne on her new film, A Time To Live which features twelve people who've been told they have a terminal illness and may only have months to live. Sue says, "I didn't want to make a film about dying but about living. I wanted to speak to people who'd decided that if they only had a short time left they were going to make the most of that time." One of her interviewees is Lisa Keech: a mother of two teenage girls, she insists a cancer diagnosis, while devastating, has improved the ...
15
MAY
2am
The Canadian poet and vlogger, Rupi Kaur, became famous when she took photographs of herself during her period. Nothing graphic, but the blood on show wasn't to the liking of Instagram who took the pictures down. She's in London at the moment reading poems from her collection Milk And Honey, so she'll be in the studio to talk about her writing, her nomadic life and how she recovered from a sexual assault.Who's in control of the purse strings in your relationship? In extreme situations money can be used as a tool to control others. We discuss financial abuse with an expert in the subject, Dr Nicola Sharp-Jeffs. She's been exploring how other countries deal with it, and whether we can adopt some of their policies to make it easier for victims. We also speak to a woman who's had first-hand experience of it.A year ago we spoke to the Somali-born, anti FGM campaigner, Hibo Wardere, about her experience of being cut at the age of six and how it's affected every part of her life. She joins Jane to talk about her recent visit to Senegal where she met communities who have abandoned FGM. As outdoor pools open their doors for the summer and women pull out their costumes and caps, it's time to reflect on the 'swimming suffragettes' who made women's swimming possible. The sport was exclusively male in the 19th century, so women turned to 'secret swimming' and fought for poolside equality. Writer and keen swimmer, Jenny Landreth, ...
13
MAY
2am
The actress Phina Oruche has always used her platform to highlight the importance of diversity in film and television. She tells us about her new one woman show, Identity Crisis and the complexity of being British-Nigerian and a proud Scouser.After a photo of 14 black male undergraduates admitted to the University of Cambridge in 2015 went viral we ask what about the black female students at Oxbridge? We hear from Imani Shola who vlogs about her experience at Cambridge, Courtney Daniella Boateng a former president of the Afro Caribbean society at Cambridge and Naomi Kellman who runs Target Oxbridge a scheme to support black students who want to apply to the universities. We hear from Anna Watkins, Patron of the Women's Sport Trust and Olympic gold medalist, and Mel Bound who started This Mum Runs: both were honoured for their achievements in sport at the BeAGameChanger awards this week.What makes a good foster carer and how do you get suitable candidates to apply? Debbie Douglas has been fostering for 25 years, she and her daughter Lydia Bright (a star of the reality TV show TOWIE) discuss their experience with Jackie Edwards a professional advisor with Foster Talk.The trafficking of people for labour and sexual exploitation is now the second most lucrative criminal commodity after drugs in the world. We hear from Jim Laird a human trafficking expert on why it's happening and what needs to be done.Food historian Dr Annie Gray tells us about Queen Victoria's love of food. Her ...
12
MAY
2am
Olympic medallist Anna Watkins on sporting game-changers who've been honoured for their achievements at the BeAGameChanger awards. Did you cook dinner from scratch last night? Or remember to take the bins out? Congratulations on some great 'adulting'! Scroll through the #adulting hashtag on Twitter and you'll see it basically means you're getting on with life's dull bits. But why celebrate it? We ask Daisy Buchanan why Generation Y need to pat themselves on the back for the most mundane of tasks, and then tell everyone about it. In the last in our series on the seven disciplines included in the Woman's Hour Craft Prize we find out what's in the "Other" category with Deirdre Figueiredo director of Craftspace, a craft development charity, and Helen Ingham, specialist technician in the letterpress printing workshop at London's Central Saint Martins. The Women's Equality Party launches its manifesto on Friday afternoon - so why is party leader Sophie Walker inviting other parties to steal its policies ahead of the launch?The contemporary story of a single mother, Maddy, is woven into a new production of Euripides' Medea at the Bristol Old Vic. The narrative is of two women who exist thousands of years apart, both seeking retribution against injustice at the hands of the men they loved. Joining Jenni writer Chino Odimba and actor Akiya Henry who takes on both the roles of Maddy and Meda in an all-female cast.
11
MAY
2am
Model Cara Delevingne recently made headlines by appearing at the Met Gala with a shaved head. She is one of a handful of female celebrities, to do it. Why do women choose to shave their heads? Jenni speaks to occasional head-shaver Lucy Jones and to Liv Little who has been shaving her head since she was 19.Woman's Hour made a documentary about anxiety with singer songwriter Laura Mvula about her own experiences of anxiety. According to the ONS young women like her are much more likely to report they're suffering from anxiety than their male counterparts. To mark Mental Health Awareness Week, we're joined by Dr Louise Theodosiou from the Royal College of Psychiatrists and Woman's Hour listener Tess who shares her experience.We find out about a new scheme in Germany - the mentoring group Welcome Mamas . It airs up refugees who are pregnant or have babies and helps them navigate their way round the health care system. Human trafficking in Scotland. A BBC Scotland documentary reports that people are now the second most lucrative criminal commodity after drugs, Many of the women trafficked are forced into sham marriages with men seeking to apply for residency in the UK. Jim Laird a human trafficking expert talks about why it's happening and what he thinks needs to be done.And we hear from two of the winners of the Asian Women of Achievement Awards an annual event, celebrating the work and contribution of Asian women in British society Fatima Zaman winner ...