GaySA Radio Presents: The Steam Room

GAYSA RADIO  |  Podcast , ±1 hr 07 min episodes every 1 week, 2 days  | 
The Steam Room is a show specifically aimed at Men who have Sex with Men (MSM). These men could be heterosexual or anywhere on the LGBTQ+ spectrum.

Teaming up with the National Department of Health’s Phila Project, GaySA Radio has devised an interesting and informative look at the world of MSM.

Each episode deals with a different aspect. Consisting of features, interviews, people’s opinions and a radio drama - each show focuses on a different aspect of MSM sexual and general health in an entertaining and sex-positive manner.

This is a show aimed at adults 18+, and topics will be discussed in a frank and honest way. Online radio is not bound by the usual broadcasting rules, and while every effort is made to keep the content within acceptable norms, tough subjects like those relating to MSM are tackled in a forthright manner while at the same time being controversial in order to start listener conversations and bring the message home

Subscribe to this channel

You can subscribe to new audio episodes published on this channel. You can follow updates using the channel's RSS feed, or via other audio platforms you may already be using.

RSS Feed

You can use any RSS feed reader to follow updates, even your browser. We recommend using an application dedicated to listening podcasts for the best experience. iOS users can look at Overcast or Castro. Pocket Casts is also very popular and has both iOS and Android versions. Add the above link to the application to follow this podcast channel.

Signup to iono.fm

Sign up for a free iono.fm user account to start building your playlist of podcast channels. You'll be able to build a personalised RSS feed you can follow or listen with our web player.
20
SEP
2018

[Steam Room] - Ep. 8 - Smoking

The Steam Room is broadcast on GaySA Radio every Wednesday from 19:00 to 21:00, and is brought to you by the National Department of Health’s Phila programme.
The Phila programme encourages all South Africans to be inspired to live, and is about keeping fit, knowing about your health and body, eating well and taking action about your health in general.
In episode 8 of the Steam Room, we talk about a habit that you might have first-hand knowledge of: smoking. All smokers know that smoking isn’t conducive to good health, but knows just as well that this habit is difficult to quit.
What are the health implications of being a smoker?
The impact smoking has on one’s health goes far beyond the warnings that are printed on cigarette packs. Dr Ezio Baraldi, a Pretoria-based family physician, says that one obvious risk is lung damage, due to the deposition of tar in the lungs. In addition, the highly addictive nicotine found in cigarettes can lead to the narrowing of blood vessels and long-term damage to the inner lining of the arteries, which can lead to high blood pressure, cardiac issues and strokes.
Wendy Gidlow is affiliated with Smokenders, a six-week programme that helps smokers to quit. Gidlow echoes Dr Baraldi’s sentiments, adding that smoking also affects brain function, oxygen levels, memory, eyesight and skin elasticity, not to mention the psychological effects associated with nicotine addiction.
“Smokers use cigarettes to reward themselves, to motivate themselves. They use cigarettes when they’re angry, to suppress emotions, they use cigarettes as company… there’s a very, very strong emotional attachment to cigarettes,” says Gidlow.
Does smoking have an influence on the sexual health of men?
Dr Baraldi explains that the damage that smoking causes to blood vessels start with smaller blood vessels first. As the blood vessel leading to the penis is a third of the size of the one leading to the heart, the blockage of arteries leading to the penis may lead to erectile dysfunction, also signalling possible heart problems in the future. Wendy Gidlow also warns of the damage that nicotine may cause in terms of hormone levels, and especially testosterone levels.
Can hypnosis help you to quit smoking?
Arno Stadler is a qualified member of the South African Institute of Hypnotism and has a practice in Nigel in Gauteng. According to Stadler, the British Medical Association has recognised hypnosis as the best way to stop smoking.
With a 92% success rate, non-medical hypnosis ...
14
SEP
2018

[The Steam Room] Ep. 7 - Sex Clubs

The Steam Room is broadcast on GaySA Radio every Wednesday from 19:00 to 21:00, and is brought to you by the National Department of Health’s Phila programme.
The Phila programme encourages all South Africans to be inspired to live, and is about keeping fit, knowing about your health and body, eating well and taking action about your health in general.
Darkrooms, glory holes, pleasure pens… in episode 7 of The Steam Room, we get frank about sex clubs.
What are sex clubs?
We spoke to Danie Hamman, who has been the owner of Camp David in Pretoria since it first opened its doors in 2003. Hamman calls Camp David “heaven for gays”.
Historically, spaces where men could safely engage in sex with other men were rare, and restricted to spaces like public bathrooms due to the criminal nature of homosexuality and homosexual acts. Hamman felt that the trouble MSMs had with the authorities, along with several instances of gay bashing, necessitated the opening of a space where men could engage in sexual activities with other men safely, securely, and without the treat of attacks for whatever reason. Hamman makes it clear, however, that Camp David is not a brothel, and paid sex as well as drug use is strictly forbidden, and no under-18s are allowed.
Jean Nel agrees with Hamman, adding that these spaces are organised to cater for specific needs within the community of men who have sex with other men.
According to Bruce Little, content creator at the Anova Health Institute, sex clubs were created to provide a service to men who make the lifestyle choice to engage in thrilling and group sex activities.
“A sex club is a convenient way to make sure that a certain group of men meet at a certain place at a certain time so that they can engage in group sex,” says Little.
Who goes to sex clubs?
Danie Hamman says that the clientele at Camp David range from gay men, to bisexual men and other men who have sex with men. Quite often, these men have specific sexual preferences and fetishes, including S&M and kinky sex. Fisting, rimming, and the chance to live out your most intimate fantasies are all on the menu at Camp David.
Jean Nel agrees, and says that there is not just one type of man that frequents sex clubs like Camp David, but that all the men who do, are sexually liberated and looking to satisfy their ...
07
SEP
2018

[The Steam Room] - Ep. 6 - Mental And Sexual Health

The Steam Room is broadcast on GaySA Radio every Wednesday from 19:00 to 21:00, and is brought to you by the National Department of Health’s Phila programme.
The Phila programme encourages all South Africans to be inspired to live, and is about keeping fit, knowing about your health and body, eating well and taking action about your health in general.
In episode 6 of the Steam Room, we delve a bit deeper – so to speak – and speak about the mental and sexual health issues relating to men who have sex with men.
Is there a link between mental health and sexual health?
Tom Budge, a Gauteng-based hypnotherapist, believes that mental health and sexual health are inextricably intertwined.
“We’re like a three-legged stool, really. We stand on a floor of spirituality. The three legs that form the pillars of who we are as human beings are intellect, our emotions and our sexuality. Those three need to be in balance if that stool is going to be at all useful. If one leg is broken or missing, or one leg is too long or too short, that’s just not going to work. ”
Budge says that one needs to make sure that there is balance in terms of sexuality, intellectuality and one’s emotional life.
Pierre Brouard, Deputy Director at the University of Pretoria’s Centre for Sexualities, AIDS and Gender, agrees and says that for many people who form a part of the LGBTQI+ community, long-standing self-esteem issues may be the result of discrimination throughout a person’s life, and may lead to mental health issues later on.
Feelings of isolation, alienation, depression and anxiety may all contribute to problems in a person’s sexual life. Contrarily, an affirming and mutually satisfying sex life contributes to mental wellbeing, which suggests a very powerful link between mental and sexual health.
Bruce Little, Content Creator at the Anova Health Institute, confirms that feelings of isolation and depression could also lead to substance abuse, risky sexual behaviour, or a combination of both.
How do mental health issues manifest in sexual health issues?
Many factors are involved when mental and sexual health issues crop up, says Budge. There may be issues of struggling with affirmation, and basic brain chemistry, like the amount of dopamine in our systems also play a role. If sexual engagement provides the only way one feels good about oneself, it may lead to obsessive sexual behaviour to chase an short-lived emotional high.
How should mental ...
29
AUG
2018

[The Steam Room] - Ep. 5 - Chemsex

The Steam Room is broadcast on GaySA Radio every Wednesday from 19:00 to 21:00, and is brought to you by the National Department of Health’s Phila programme.
The Phila programme encourages all South Africans to be inspired to live, and is about keeping fit, knowing about your health and body, eating well and taking action about your health in general.
In episode 5 of The Steam Room we talk about a controversial topic in the community of men who have sex with men: chemsex.
What is chemsex?
Chemsex is sex that happens between men while under the influence of illegal substances. These substances may include things like marijuana, Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, commonly known as ecstacy), crystal methamphetamine (crystal meth), gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB, also referred to as “G”) and methcathinone (commonly known as CAT), among others. Another legal substance that may be used is a class of alkyl nitrites that is inhaled, commonly referred to as poppers.
In the gay subculture, chemsex sometimes forms a part of a hook-up where the purpose is to take drugs with the intention of having sex. On dating apps like Grindr, men who want to engage in chemsex refer to it as “chemfun” or “party and play”.
Bruce Little, Content Creator at the Anova Health Institute, says that there are numerous reasons why men may want to engage in chemsex, including low self-esteem or other insecurities. Taking substances makes them feel more confident and takes away their inhibitions. Other men may feel that it enhances their sexual experience or allows them to engage in sexual activity for longer.
Juan Nel says that chemsex has become a part of the gay subculture, as a result of the underground gay culture of the past. Substances are often used by men who have sex with men to disinhibit themselves or to maximise the experience of sex. This can become a problem when the substance does not provide the same high as it used to, and a user needs a larger amount to enjoy the same experience as before.
Poppers are often the first substance that men who have sex with men encounter. Even when using poppers, users should be aware that the long-term effects are inconclusive, and take care when using poppers on the long-term.
What are the health implications of chemsex?
The disinhibition people experience when engaging in chemsex means that they often don’t take as much care to protect themselves during sex. In addition, there may be ...
24
AUG
2018

[The Steam Room] - Ep. 4 - Daytime Sex

The Steam Room is broadcast on GaySA Radio every Wednesday from 19:00 to 21:00, and is brought to you by the National Department of Health’s Phila programme.
The Phila programme encourages all South Africans to be inspired to live, and is about keeping fit, knowing about your health and body, eating well and taking action about your health in general.
Episode 4 of The Steam Room focuses on daytime sex – a relatively common practice among the community of men who have sex with men.
What is daytime sex and how does it differ from sex at other times?
We spoke to Bruce Little, Content Creator at the Anova Health Institute, to find out what daytime sex entails. Little describes daytime sex or daytime hook-ups as a sexual practice where men who have sex with men meet up with other men during quieter times of their day, for instance during a lunch or tea break.
Men who have sex with men typically find each other via a social networking app, like Grindr, and then meet up in a public bathroom or other spaces to have sex.
Before dating apps were as widely used as they are now, gay men would often meet in areas that were known as so-called “cruising spots” where men would meet to solicit sex with other men in public spaces – this is known as “cottaging”.
The profile of the typical MSM who has daytime sex is difficult to pinpoint. While there are thrill-seekers who enjoy the risks involved with random hook-ups, there are also individuals who may be relatively averse to risks, but still engage in daytime sex.
What are the risks involved with daytime sex?
Bruce Little advises that having sex without using condoms and a water-based lubricant is always risky, no matter what time of the day or night it takes place. This is especially valid when men are having anal sex, due to the additional risks that this sexual practice carries, although having oral sex without protection still poses the risk of pharyngeal gonorrhoea, or gonorrhoea of the throat.
Daytime sex and STIs: how to protect yourself
The higher risk profile of anal sex necessitates that all men who have sex with men take extra care. This is also applicable to men who have oral sex, as this also comes with potential risks.
Men who have sex with other men are at a higher risk of HIV infection and transmission, as well as infection ...
15
AUG
2018

[THE STEAM ROOM] Ep. 3 - After Nines

The Steam Room is broadcast on GaySA Radio every Wednesday from 19:00 to 21:00, and is brought to you by the National Department of Health’s Phila programme.
The Phila programme encourages all South Africans to be inspired to live, and is about keeping fit, knowing about your health and body, eating well and taking action about your health in general.
Episode 3 of The Steam Room focuses on another part of the MSM demographic: After-nines.
We spoke to Bruce Little, Content Creator at the Anova Health Institute, to find out more about After-nines.
What is an After-nine?
“After-nine” is a slang term for a man that is generally known to be, or identifies as heterosexual, but will visit certain venues or people after 9 o’clock in the evening to engage in sexual experiences with other men.
Why do people have sex like this?
Even in a time where people are believed to be more enlightened and accepting, society still tends to be critical of gay and bisexual men, and there is still quite a bit of stigma attached to being gay or engaging in homosexual acts. This is why some men prefer to hide this identity from their communities and families.
Even so, Little says that men sometimes engage in clandestine sexual activity because of the taboo associated with it, which adds an element of excitement to the sexual activity, making it more enticing.
How prevalent is this phenomenon?
It is very difficult to gauge exact numbers, as these people don’t want to be identified or found out, but we do know that After-nines exist from the secondary evidence given by the gay and bisexual men who engage in sex acts with them.
Do After-nines face more stigma than the general MSM population?
One could argue that After-nines do not face the amount of discrimination associated with homo- or bisexuality because their communities generally do not know that they engage in sexual activity with other men. To society, these men may appear heteronormative, as they are often married and have children, fitting the profile of a heterosexual person. However, After-nines are sometimes scorned by the LGBTQ community, because of their decision not to come out.
What health issues could After-nines face?
Like all men who have sex with men, and because of the higher risk profile of anal sex, After-nines have a higher risk of HIV infection and transmission, as well as infection and transmission of other STIs like syphilis and gonorrhoea. After-nines should ...
07
AUG
2018

[The Steam Room] - Ep. 2 - First Timers

The Steam Room is broadcast on GaySA Radio every Wednesday from 19:00 to 21:00, and is brought to you by the National Department of Health’s Phila programme.
The Phila programme encourages all South Africans to be inspired to live, and is about keeping fit, knowing about your health and body, eating well and taking action about your health in general.
After an introduction to MSM in Episode 1, Episode 2 of The Steam Room focuses on MSM first-timers.
This week, we spoke to Bruce Little, Content Creator at the Anova Health Institute, to gain insight into the experiences of MSM first-timers.
What does it mean to be an MSM first-timer?
An MSM first-timer is a man who is having sex with another man for the first time.
Little says that a more open-minded society where sexuality is considered to be more fluid has led to more men becoming curious and less inhibited by the norms of society. This has lead to a greater willingness to experiment within the realm of sexuality.
What should first-timers keep in mind before diving into MSM?
Little recommends that first-timers take it easy. When embarking on your first sexual experience with another man, it is important that both parties give their consent and are preferably not too inebriated by alcohol or drugs. Pacing yourself is also important – don’t force yourself to do anything that you’re not enjoying or doesn’t feel right.
“It’s supposed to be a pleasurable and enjoyable intimate experience with another person. Take your time and don’t expect yourself to be this stellar porn star the first time you have a sexual experience with another man,” says Little.
What about the stigma surrounding MSM?
We live in a time where there is still some stigma surrounding MSM, and you do need to be careful about promoting your sexual orientation in certain communities.
Little recommends that you consider your environment. “Make sure that you’re safe and not in a situation where you could come to harm or be the victim of someone else’s ignorance or stupidity”. You can do this by choosing safe spaces and platforms where you will be supported when being open about your sexuality and exploring your sexual fluidity.
Little maintains that shame is not exclusively the domain of people who fall within the LGBTQ+ spectrum, as many cisgendered and heterosexual people are also faced with issues surrounding shame. However, men who have sex with men should keep a rational and analytical perspective ...
09
JUL
2018

[The Steam Room] - Ep. 1 - What is MSM?

The Steam Room is broadcast on GaySA Radio every Wednesday from 19:00 to 21:00, and is brought to you by the National Department of Health’s Phila programme.
The Phila programme encourages all South Africans to be inspired to live, and is about keeping fit, knowing about your health and body, eating well and taking action about your health in general.
Episode 1 of The Steam Room focuses on MSM, or men who have sex with men.
GaySA Radio spoke to Johan Meyer, the Health Manager at OUT in Pretoria, a professional service organisation focusing on direct health and mental health services, research, mainstreaming and advocacy for Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) people.
What is MSM?
The term MSM is an acronym for “men who have sex with men”. These men do not necessarily identify as gay, bisexual or transgender, but do occasionally “bat for the other team”, or have sex with men. They self-identify as heterosexual, and many are happily married to women and have children. MSM prefer being in a relationship with a woman, but sometimes feel the urge to have sex with other men.
How prevalent is MSM?
According to Meyer, it is difficult to get exact statistics about men who have sex with men, as this is a very hidden group. While gay men are out and proud and bisexual men are also gaining more visibility, men who have sex with men are already struggling with questions regarding their sexuality, and have great difficulty in coming out.
In addition to this, the community struggles to understand the concept, as it doesn’t clearly fit into any of the boxes regarding sexuality that society has gotten used to. According to OUT’s estimates, there are roughly 40 000 men who have sex with men in Pretoria alone, and Meyer believes that they add to the existing 11% of men who identify as gay.
What issues do MSM face?
Due to issues like the community’s disregard for this group of people, men who have sex with men often face stigmatisation, discrimination, and are also quite marginalised – in addition to the existing instances of internalised homophobia that are characteristic of many people who face psychological difficulties regarding their gender and sexuality. All of these factors make men who have sex with men an especially difficult group to reach, both for research and statistical purposes and for health services.
According to research done by OUT in 2015 to gauge levels of empowerment and to ...

8 episodes