World Policy On Air

WORLD POLICY INSTITUTE  |  Podcast , ±28 min episodes every 6 days  |  Broadcast schedule  | 
World Policy On Air is a podcast from the pages and website of World Policy Journal featuring former Newsweek On Air host David Alpern and conversations with experts and journalists from around the globe.

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26
JAN

World Policy On Air, Ep. 154: "The Rights of Indigenous Peoples"

When Indigenous representatives began to draft a U.N. document enshrining the right to self-determination, many states worried that their proposals would open the door to secession. On today's episode of World Policy On Air, University of Alaska professor Dalee Sambo Dorough discusses the lengthy process of overcoming these concerns and securing support for the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
19
JAN

World Policy On Air, Ep. 153: "Protest & Community at Standing Rock"

Photographer Josué Rivas spent months on the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota, documenting not only the protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline, but also the culture that developed among the participants. This week, he joins World Policy On Air to discuss his photoessay in the winter issue of World Policy Journal.
12
JAN

World Policy On Air, Ep. 152: "Native Voices"

Last year marked the 10th anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the first international treaty to recognize Indigenous peoples’ right to self-determination. On today’s episode of World Policy On Air, editor Jessica Loudis discusses the new issue of World Policy Journal, which features Native contributors from across the globe.
04
JAN

World Policy On Air [Encore]: "Kill The Indian, Save the Man"

On this week's episode of World Policy On Air, we revisit our conversation with documentary photographer Daniella Zalcman about the painful history and legacy of Canada's Indian Residential Schools, which separated Indigenous children from their families in an effort to eradicate their culture and language. The discussion in this episode was originally published on Oct. 13, 2016.
28
DEC
2017

World Policy On Air [Encore]: "Innovation at the Arctic Council"

This week on World Policy On Air, we revisit our conversation with Nadine Fabbi, the head of the Arctic Fellows program at the University of Washington, who discusses the progress the Arctic Council has made after 30 years of operation. This episode is an encore of the episode originally published on Aug. 25, 2017.
22
DEC
2017

World Policy On Air, Ep. 151: "The Kremlin's Revolution Problem"

Russian state media marked the centenary of the Bolshevik revolution this year by airing new television dramas, launching interactive websites, and live tweeting. On today's episode of World Policy On Air, Moscow-based journalist Amie Ferris-Rotman discusses the current government's conflicted relationship with the country's Soviet past.
15
DEC
2017

World Policy On Air, Ep. 150: "Budapest's Drug Scare"

The Hungarian government has taken a law-and-order approach to address a rise in drug use, often targeting poor and minority communities in police raids. On today's episode of World Policy On Air, drug-policy expert Peter Sarosi discusses the social issues, from structural racism to a lack of affordable housing, that contribute to high rates of drug use and are largely ignored by policymakers.
08
DEC
2017

World Policy On Air, Ep. 149: "Turkey's Imperiled Press"

As Erdoğan's Turkey becomes increasingly polarized and intolerant of political opposition, a 1943 novel by Sabahattin Ali demonstrates how literature can introduce dissident themes in ways newspapers cannot. On this week's episode of World Policy On Air, president of English PEN Maureen Freely discusses the state of Turkish media culture today.
01
DEC
2017

World Policy On Air, Ep. 148: "Responsible Paternity"

Trends in Latin America's marriage rates, and rates of children born outside of marriage, often reflect changes in laws that create economic incentives—or disincentives—for certain family structures. This week on World Policy On Air, Barnard College professor Nara Milanich discusses how 21st-century "responsible paternity" laws serve the agendas of neoliberal states more than the low-income, unmarried mothers they were intended to help.
23
NOV
2017

World Policy On Air, Ep. 147: "Rape and Power in Nicaragua"

Nicaragua ranks fourth in the world for most reported incidents of rape, and this problem originates in the highest echelons of power. This week on World Policy On Air, journalist Ian Bateson talks about rape and power, and why the country’s laws are failing Nicaraguan women.
17
NOV
2017

World Policy On Air, Ep. 146: "Past Corruption Haunts Tunisia"

In the wake of the Arab Spring, Tunisia is the only state where a protest movement gave way to a democratic transition. This week on World Policy On Air, Amna Guellali of Human Rights Watch discusses how Tunisia's past corruption and authoritarianism are haunting the fledgling democracy.
10
NOV
2017

World Policy On Air, Ep. 145: "How Likely is Trade War?"

President Trump railed against China on the campaign trail, citing unfair trade practices, but as he meets with Xi Jinping many speculate that Trump will reconsider plans to limit Chinese imports. This week on World Policy On Air, World Policy fellow James H. Nolt argues that the conventional wisdom is wrong and a trade war is far more likely than many believe.

156 episodes

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