World Policy On Air

WORLD POLICY INSTITUTE  |  Podcast , ±27 min episodes every 6 days  |  Broadcast schedule  | 
World Policy On Air is a podcast from the pages and website of World Policy Journal featuring former Newsweek On Air host David Alpern, conversations with experts and journalists from around the globe, plus timely insights from international affairs analyst Michael Moran, head of Transformative.io, risk and geostrategy consultants.

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23
NOV

World Policy On Air, Ep. 147: "Rape and Power in Nicaragua"

Nicaragua ranks fourth in the world for most reported incidents of rape, and this problem originates in the highest echelons of power. This week on World Policy On Air, journalist Ian Bateson talks about rape and power, and why the country’s laws are failing Nicaraguan women.
17
NOV

World Policy On Air, Ep. 146: "Past Corruption Haunts Tunisia"

In the wake of the Arab Spring, Tunisia is the only state where a protest movement gave way to a democratic transition. This week on World Policy On Air, Amna Guellali of Human Rights Watch discusses how Tunisia's past corruption and authoritarianism are haunting the fledgling democracy.
10
NOV

World Policy On Air, Ep. 145: "How Likely is Trade War?"

President Trump railed against China on the campaign trail, citing unfair trade practices, but as he meets with Xi Jinping many speculate that Trump will reconsider plans to limit Chinese imports. This week on World Policy On Air, World Policy fellow James H. Nolt argues that the conventional wisdom is wrong and a trade war is far more likely than many believe.
03
NOV

World Policy On Air, Ep. 144: "Arms & Alliances in East Asia"

The specter of nuclear conflict has been hanging over the Korean peninsula for some time, but recent inflammatory rhetoric has brought heightened urgency to the situation. This week on World Policy On Air, World Policy fellow Jonathan Cristol discusses the future of security cooperation in East Asia.
27
OCT

World Policy On Air, Ep. 143: "The Global Gamble"

In 2014 people across the world spent over $293 billion on lottery tickets, an amount greater than the gross domestic product of more than 150 countries. This week on World Policy On Air, Jeff Kelly Lowenstein describes the multinational gaming organizations that dominate this global industry.
19
OCT

World Policy On Air, Ep. 142: "The Price of Family Unification in the UK"

When she served as home secretary, Prime Minister Theresa May devised a "minimum income requirement" to limit net migration to the United Kingdom to 100,000 people. This week on World Policy On Air, journalist Ismail Einashe describes the effects of this salary threshold, which prevents thousands of British residents from bringing spouses into the country, on children and families.
13
OCT

World Policy On Air, Ep. 141: "Saving Families From Our Fate"

Hundreds of young people have left Belgium to join terrorist groups abroad since 2011. On this week's episode of World Policy On Air, we speak with journalist Lisa De Bode about how one woman, Saliha Ben Ali, whose son died in Syria in 2013, is sharing her story in an effort to help fellow mothers recognize signs of radicalization in their children.
06
OCT

World Policy On Air, Ep. 140: "Terror and the Family"

Former U.K. Prime Minster David Cameron, when discussing the possible radicalization of Muslim men, said that Muslim women could be a "moderating force" on their husbands. This week on World Policy On Air, Rafia Zakaria disputes this orientalist thinking and describes how jihadi groups' new recruitment tactics are changing views on women and Islam.
29
SEP

World Policy On Air, Ep. 139: "Constructing Family"

In this week's episode of World Policy On Air, World Policy Journal managing editor Laurel Jarombek previews the new "Constructing Family" issue, discussing responses to a "Big Question" about family values as well as essays on terror and gender roles, intimate violence in Shinzô Abe's Japan, and "responsible paternity" policies in Latin America.
22
SEP

World Policy On Air, Ep. 138: "North Korean Nuclear Quandary"

At his first speech at the U.N., President Trump threatened to "completely destroy" North Korea in response to its nuclear weapons program and provocative missile tests. This week on World Policy On Air, World Policy Senior Fellow Jim Nolt discusses how a slide into open conflict may be more likely than we think.
15
SEP

World Policy On Air, Ep. 137: "Fanning the Flames of Violence in Burundi"

Earlier this month, a report by the U.N. Commission of Inquiry on Burundi recorded a litany of human rights abuses and recommended that the International Criminal Court open an investigation immediately. On today's episode of World Policy On Air, political analyst Amilcar Ryumeko discusses how the international community has failed to protect Burundian victims of atrocities.
07
SEP

World Policy On Air, Ep. 136: "Why Global AIDS Relief Failed to Stop the Disease"

The campaign to combat HIV/AIDS is often cited as an example of how fundraising efforts by states and private organizations can be channelled to address critical global issues. On today's episode of World Policy On Air, journalist Ross Benes discusses why the billions of dollars that poured into AIDS-relief groups' coffers failed to stop the spread of the disease.

147 episodes

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