Book Choice

FINE MUSIC RADIO  |  Podcast , ±48 min episodes every 4 weeks, 4 days  | 
Book Choice, is broadcast on the first Monday of each month, presented by Cindy Moritz.

While you’re munching your lunch or driving the myriad motorways, you’ll hear all that’s best in books. Cape Town’s top book reviewers will entertain and inform you as they cheerfully chat about the newest and nicest fiction and non-fiction on current book shelves.

You love author interviews? Well, we line up those for your pleasure and leisure too.
You want an easy-peasy competition each month with good prizes? All there, prettily planned for your lovely listening.

Do join us for your delectation… for your entertainment… for your information.

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07
SEP

Book Choice - Sept 2020

It’s the first Monday of the month, and we are somewhat gobsmacked to admit that it’s already the Spring edition of Bookchoice. The months have certainly merged into each other this strange year, but if you’re listening I think we can all agree that our constant has been that we’ve been able to turn to a reliable book, whether hard copy, e-book or audio version, to broaden our world when it has often seemed rather frustratingly restricted and small. Happily, here in South Africa we are emerging into warmer weather, fewer rules and regulations and hopefully better health.
03
AUG

Book Choice - Aug 2020

We begin with a memoir, reviewed by Vanessa Levenstein, titled Undeniable – Memoirs of a covert war, written by Phillippa Garson. It’s her riveting account of working as a journalist during the early 1990s in South Africa. Melvyn Minnaar found the world of art worth a detailed visit in William Feaver’s The Lives of Lucien Freud: Youth 1922-1968, and Leanne Voysey regales us with her thoughts on Felicity McLean’s debut novel, The van Apfel Girls are Gone. Beverley Roos-Muller remains loyal to one of her favourite writers, Martin Cruz Smith and gives us her take on The Siberian Dilemma, and Philp Todres brings rhinos centre stage with Remembering Rhinos, part of the Remembering Wildlife series of four books by Margot Ragget. Seasoned ornithologist Rob Little recommends Rupert Watson’s Peacocks & Picathartes, Reflections on Africa’s birdlife, for those who’d like to stay in touch with the wonders of our truly rich African bird diversity, and Beryl Eichenberger spoke to Hedi Lampert, author of The Trouble with my Aunt, uncovering family secrets discovered during a real life journey with Fragile X syndrome. Finishing our monthly offering, Lesley Beake encourages us to look where the books for the very young are found for something to delight, and suggests four of author and illustrator Chris Houghton’s very best.
04
MAY

Book Choice - May 2020

Vanessa Levenstein could not contain her excitement at getting her hands on Hamnet, by one of her favourite authors, Maggie O’ Farrell. Melvyn Minnaar calls The Lost Pianos of Siberia by Sophy Roberts, “a glorious travelogue with a difference”, and Beryl Eichenberger reviewed A Daughter’s Tale by Arnando Lucas Correa, in which seven decades of secrets unravel with the arrival of a box of letters from the distant past. Beverley Roos-Muller grappled with her views on the much anticipated third in trilogy The Mirror and the Light, by Hilary Mantel, and Philp Todres was impressed with Jonathan Safran Foer’s ability to give a personal and emotive voice to climate change in his latest offering, We are the Weather.
John Hanks calls Warwick and Michele Tartboton’s A guide to the Dragonflies and Damselflies of South Africa, “one of the best illustrated field guides anywhere in the world”, and Lesley Beake suggests two good reads for the 10-12 year old age group, Tiger Heart by Penny Chrimes and Mirror Magic by Claire Fayers.
06
APR

Book Choice - April 2020

Beverley Roos-Muller gave considerable thought to her choice of books this month, and has even themed her contribution. No prizes for guessing the topical theme, but there may well be a prize for listening closely to her reviews of The Body: a guide for occupants, by Bill Bryson and Plague, Pox and Pandemics by Howard Phillips. Vanessa Levenstein was duly impressed by Chanel Miller’s Know my name, the memoir of the woman previously known as Emily Doe, who was at the centre of a much publicized rape case in the US. Melvyn Minnaar highly recommends Apeirogon by Colm McCann which he describes as “truly uplifting”, giving “hope amid our and all division”, while Penny Lorimer provides our monthly dose of thrillers with Blood Will Be Born by Gary Donnelly and Three hours by Rosamund Lupton. John Hanks gives his sweeping view of Birds of Southern Africa and their tracks and signs, by Lee Gutteridge, and Beryl Eichenberger stays with flying things but takes us across continents with The Beekeeper of Aleppo by Christy Lefteri. Prepare to fasten your seat belts for Philp Todres’ interview with Damian Barr as they discuss the author’s latest novel You will be safe here. Philip calls it a “rough but riveting ride”, that transports the reader back to Boer War era South Africa. Lesley Beake brings to the table her inspired choice for younger readers, both Tiger themed: The tiger who came to tea, written and illustrated by Judith Kerr, republished in 2018, and Tiger Walk by Dianne Hofmeyr, illustrated by Jesse Hodgson.
07
FEB

Book Choice - February 2020

It’s time for another edition of Bookchoice on Fine Music Radio, it being the first Monday of the month of love, and we’re broadcasting from the Artscape Theatre in Cape Town. I’m Cindy Moritz, and as usual we have a diverse and interesting selection of reading for booklovers around Cape Town, or if you’re streaming online, wherever it is you’re listening.

Melvyn Minnaar fell under the influence of acclaimed Nigerian author Chigozie Obioma’s An Orchestra of Minorities. Beverley Roos-Muller applauds Sir Salman Rushdie's latest novel, Quichotte (pronounced Key-Shot), loosely based on the classic Don Quixote story, and which was shortlisted for the Booker last year. Philip Todres spoke to John Matisonn about his new book, released in December, titled Cyril’s Choices, Lessons From 25 Years of Freedom in South Africa, and Penny Lorimer discovered Canadian author Louise Penny with her most recent, A Better Man, and also read A Death In The Medina by James Von Leyden. John Hanks found value in Grant Fowld and Graham Spence’s Saving the last Rhino and Beryl Eichenberger regales us with her views on Fiona Niell’s Beneath the surface as well as Kate Furnivall’s Guardian of Lies. Phillippa Cheifitz delved into the Africa Cookbook by owner of The Africa Café’s Portia Mbau and Lesley Beake perceives the shift in teen reading with The choice between us by Edyth Bullbring, Singing down the Stars by Nerine Dorman and, The Music Box by Toby Bennett.
06
JAN

Book Choice - January 2020

It’s time for Bookchoice on Fine Music Radio, coming to you from the Artscape Theatre in Cape Town. I’m Cindy Moritz, and we’re ringing in the new year with a stack of exciting and interesting reads handpicked by our team of reviewers.
02
DEC
2019

Book Choice - December 2019

Beverley Roos-Muller delved into the world of spies in John le Carre’s latest Agent Running in the Field as well as Jonathan Ancer’s Betrayal: The secret lives of Apartheid spies. Melvyn Minnaar rocked into December with Elton John’s autobiography, Me; and Vanessa Levenstein spoke to Heidi Brauer of Hollard Insurance about a project that uses social media to get parents and children reading together. Nicole Smith interviewed Deon Meyer about his latest book, The Last Hunt and Beryl Eichenberger gives a thumbs up to Death on the Limpopo: A Tannie Maria Mystery by Sally Andrew as well as A Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes for holiday entertainment. Solly Moeng, in his first review for Bookchoice, gives us his thoughts on Crispian Olver’s A City Divided. Lesley Beake recommends two delightful children’s books, It’s Jamela, the complete collection by Nicky Daly, and A Moon Girl stole my best friend, by Rebecca Patterson and Phillippa Cheifitz leaves us with a taste of a vegan Xmas.
04
NOV
2019

Book Choice - November 2019

Beverley Roos-Muller waded into Booker controversy territory and read both
The Testaments by Margaret Atwood and Girl, Woman, Other by Bernadine Evaristo, joint winners for 2019. Melvyn Minnaar devoured Furious Hours, Casey Cep’s literary true crime thriller about Harper Lee’s non-fiction novel that never saw the light of day. John Hanks strongly recommends Gary Goldman & Marieka Gryzenhout’s superbly illustrated Field Guide to Mushrooms & other Fungi of South Africa. Debut reviewer Chegofatso Modika explored what it means to be queer in South Africa in They Called Me Queer compiled by Kim Windvogel and Kelly-Eve Koopman. Lesley Beake could not resist master of language Philip Pullman’s latest, The Book of Dust volume 2. Beryl Eichenberger discovered a sensitive approach to grief in Melina Lewis’s After you Died. The novel, in which four young women go for an early run, and only three return is set in Fish Hoek. Vanessa Levenstein found much that was familiar in Finoula Dowling’s Okay, Okay, Okay. Penny Lorimer brings us her views on The Second Sleep by Robert Harris and A Walk at Midnight by Alex van Tonder. Fred Khumalo’s The Longest March, took Philip Todres back 120 years, when 7000 Zulu mine workers marched from the gold mines of Johannesburg to Natal covering a distance of five hundred kilometres over ten days, and Vanessa Levenstein spoke to Andrew Newman about his conscious bedtime stories for children.
10
OCT
2019

Book Choice - October 2019

Penny Lorimer shares the drama of Louise Candlish’s Those People and revisits private detective Jackson Brodie in Kate Atkinson’s latest, Big Sky. John Hanks describes the Field Guide to the Frogs and other Amphibians of Africa by Alan Channing and Mark-Oliver Rödel as an ambitious undertaking that he highly recommends, and then he credits Madkadikgadi Pans: A travellers guite to the salt flats of Botswana for his decision on where to travel next. Beryl Eichenberger was transfixed by Elif Shafak’s Ten minutes 38 seconds in this strange world, in which the reader is exposed to the captivating last moments of Leila’s life under the skies of Istanbul. Phillippa Cheifitz tosses in a bit of culinary sass with a review of Zola Nene’s Simply Zola, and Lesley Beake returns with her choice of children’s books, the delightful “What’s Up Thoko!” written and illustrated by Niki Daly, and Raj and the Best Day Ever by Seb Brown. And Vanessa Levenstein, deeply moved by the passing of American icon Toni Morrison, compares Remembered by Yvonne Battle-Felton to Morrison’s Beloved in a sensitive and perceptive way. In studio with me today is the author of the already much-discussed Zephany, Joanne Jowell, who will share some of her insights around telling this multi-layered story.
02
SEP
2019

Book Choice - September 2019

Penny Lorimer shares the drama of Louise Candlish’s Those People and revisits private detective Jackson Brodie in Kate Atkinson’s latest, Big Sky. John Hanks describes the Field Guide to the Frogs and other Amphibians of Africa by Alan Channing and Mark-Oliver Rödel as an ambitious undertaking that he highly recommends, and then he credits Madkadikgadi Pans: A travellers guite to the salt flats of Botswana for his decision on where to travel next. Beryl Eichenberger was transfixed by Elif Shafak’s Ten minutes 38 seconds in this strange world, in which the reader is exposed to the captivating last moments of Leila’s life under the skies of Istanbul. Phillippa Cheifitz tosses in a bit of culinary sass with a review of Zola Nene’s Simply Zola, and Lesley Beake returns with her choice of children’s books, the delightful “What’s Up Thoko!” written and illustrated by Niki Daly, and Raj and the Best Day Ever by Seb Brown. And Vanessa Levenstein, deeply moved by the passing of American icon Toni Morrison, compares Remembered by Yvonne Battle-Felton to Morrison’s Beloved in a sensitive and perceptive way. In studio with me today is the author of the already much-discussed Zephany, Joanne Jowell, who will share some of her insights around telling this multi-layered story.

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