World Business Report

BBC  |  Podcast, ±17 min episodes every 16 hours
Analysis of the big global business and economic issues, as they affect consumers and investors. Broadcast on weekdays.
23
MAY
2am
After the terror attack on a Manchester concert venue, we hear about the challenge of providing security for big events from Steve Blake, a British expert in event security.The White House reveals plans for big cuts in government spending. But who will feel the pain and will Congress agree? We speak to Romina Boccia, deputy director of the right of centre Washington think tank, the Heritage Foundation.The US government files a lawsuit against the car maker Fiat Chrysler, accusing it of trying to fool emissions tests. We get the latest from the BBC's Theo Leggett. We cross to the west African nation of Ivory Coast and to the BBC's Tamasin Ford who reports on pay protests by soldiers. The right to recline on a plane; what would you want in return if that right was taken away? We hear from Professor Christopher Buccafusco at New York's Cardozo Law School. And for news from the financial markets, we speak to Brian Tora at the stockbroker J M Finn.
22
MAY
2am
Hours after striking $350bn worth of arms deals with Saudi Arabia, Donald Trump has told Muslim leaders that fighting terrorism is a battle between good and evil. We get analysis from Ankit Panda, a senior editor at the DiplomatIran's moderates have won the Presidency and all 21 seats on Tehran's city council. Is a new business relationship with the rest of the world now within reach? We hear from Professor Anoush Ehteshami from Durham University.Swiss voters have backed major changes to the country's energy policy, which will see the phasing out of nuclear power. Patrick Dummler from the Avenir Suisse think tank delves into the details..India is introducing a Goods and Services tax which will apply to anything sold in the country - at rates of between four and twenty-eight percent. Our regular commentator, the independent economist Michael Hughes explains how the GST would work:And chess Grand Master Garry Kasparov gives us his thoughts on strategy and artificial intelligence.
22
MAY
2am
Ford has replaced its chief executive following a major reshuffle at the US car giant. Dr Mattias Holweg of the Said Business School at Oxford University considers the legacy left by outgoing boss Mark Fields. Also in the programme, Facebook's internal rules for regulating content on the site have been leaked. Adam Hildreth is chief executive of Crisp Thinking, which moderates sites for hundreds of organisations, and tells us what he makes of the internal rulebook. On a visit to Israel, President Donald Trump has said he sees an opportunity to bring peace to the Middle East. We ask Oded Rose, chief executive of the Israel-America Chamber of Commerce whether business can help foster ties between Israelis and Palestinians. We discuss the Green Party's manifesto ahead of next month's UK general election, with Green Party co-leader Jonathan Bartley. Plus Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times takes inspiration from a new a degree course to 'call BS' on some especially grating nonsense from the corporate world.
22
MAY
2am
Ford has replaced its chief executive following a major reshuffle at the US car giant. Dr Mattias Holweg of the Said Business School at Oxford University considers the legacy left by outgoing boss Mark Fields. Also in the programme, Facebook's internal rules for regulating content on the site have been leaked. Adam Hildreth is chief executive of Crisp Thinking, which moderates sites for hundreds of organisations, and tells us what he makes of the internal rulebook. On a visit to Israel, President Donald Trump has said he sees an opportunity to bring peace to the Middle East. We ask Oded Rose, chief executive of the Israel-America Chamber of Commerce whether business can help foster ties between Israelis and Palestinians. We discuss the Green Party's manifesto ahead of next month's UK general election, with Green Party co-leader Jonathan Bartley. Plus Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times takes inspiration from a new a degree course to 'call BS' on some especially grating nonsense from the corporate world.
19
MAY
2am
Donald Trump is heading to Saudi Arabia for his first foreign visit as US president. Nick Pelham is Middle East correspondent for The Economist, and tells us what the business community can expect from the trip. Also in the programme, General Motors is curtailing ambitions to become a big player in the Indian car market. The BBC's Suranjana Tewari explains the background. As the US aims to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, the BBC's Michelle Fleury has been looking at the potential impact on the Mexican car industry. A BBC investigation has discovered a flaw in HSBC bank's voice recognition security for customers. The BBC's Dan Simmons explains how his twin brother managed to trick the system into allowing him into Dan's account. Plus we look back at some of the week's big business stories with Sujeet Indap from the Financial Times, and Riva Gold of the Wall Street Journal.
18
MAY
2am
Brazil's President Michel Temer faces allegations of corruption. The BBC's Daniel Gallas brings us the latest details. Also in the programme, the founder of Fox News Roger Ailes has died. Media commentator Jeff Jarvis assesses his legacy. Britain's ruling Conservative party has revealed its manifesto ahead of next month's general election. The BBC's Edwin Lane reports on the economic issues faced by voters in south Wales. We hear about efforts in Kenya to combat food waste from the BBC's Michael Kaloki. Plus in a move that will exclude productions made by Netflix, from next year the Cannes film festival will not consider films that have not been released in French cinemas. George Szalai of the Hollywood Reporter explains the background.
17
MAY
2am
Iranians vote on Friday in their first presidential election since sanctions were lifted. The BBC's Amir Paivar explains how the economy has been centre stage throughout the campaign. Also in the programme, as US and European officials discuss extending the ban on laptops in aircraft cabins to flights originating in Europe, BBC transport correspondent Richard Westcott considers the likely impact. Our economic commentator Irwin Stelzer of the Hudson Institute in Washington assesses last week's surprise trade deal between the US and China. The BBC's Guy Hedgecoe reports on a migrant lottery along the only land border between Africa and Europe. Plus the Swiss confectionery giant Nestle has lost a court case in the UK to try and trademark the shape of its KitKat chocolate bar. Sally Britton is an intellectual property specialist at the law firm Mishcon de Reya, and tells us how much of a setback this is for Nestle.