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02
AUG
11am

Square to buy Australia's Afterpay

In Australia's biggest ever buyout, Jack Dorsey's Square has offered to buy Afterpay. Jonathan Shapiro writes about banking and finance at The Australian Financial Review, and tells us what is so attractive about the $29bn 'buy now, pay later' giant.

Also in the programme, the BBC's Ivana Davidovic reports on whether new scientific developments might help genetically modified foods to shed the suspicion with which they've been viewed by many consumers and health authorities around the world.

Plus, America's Sunset Studios, behind hits such as La La Land, plans to invest almost a billion dollars creating a major new film, television and digital production complex in Hertfordshire, England. We find out more about the project from Georg Szalai, international business editor of The Hollywood Reporter.
01
AUG
8pm

Americans banned from investing in some Chinese companies

From Monday Americans will be banned from investing in 59 Chinese companies, including technology firms like Huawei. The move aims to stop the flow of capital into defence and surveillance technology companies which the White House says will undermine security. We get analysis from Shirley Wu, a research fellow at the University of Harvard, who monitors relations between Beijing and Washington. Wildfires, record high temperatures and strong winds are sweeping parts of Greece, Turkey and Lebanon, forcing the evacuation of thousands of people; we hear from Eleni Myrivili, a former deputy mayor of Athens, who has just been appointed as the city's Chief Heat Officer. On August 12th, Zambians will vote in a national election, which comes as poverty is more widespread, the country's foreign debt has increased, the economy has suffered recession and a third wave of of Covid 19 is keeping children out of school. So what will the implications be for the economy? We speak to Paul Nyambe, founder and chief executive of Zamgoat a company that farms and produces goat meat in Lusaka. Over the last year surfing has seen a boom in popularity, as people who want escape lockdown have taken to the waves. The surge in popularity is a major boost to Europe's biggest online surf equipment retailer, Boardshop in the UK and we hear from co-founder, Roger Moon.
30
JUL
7pm

Update: Japan imposes further covid restrictions

We look at the latest on the spread of coronavirus across Asia with Professor Giridhar Babu, an epidemiologist, from the Public Health Foundation of India. Plus, we hear from one of the most senior women in the world of American business, Sallie Krawcheck of female-led investment firm Ellevest, about the financial inequality faced by women, and why it's become worse after the pandemic. Plus, the latest on the US stock markets with Scott Nations in the US.
30
JUL
11am

Eurozone out of recession

Whilst the Eurozone economy remains smaller than pre-pandemic, it is out of recession. BBC economics correspondent Andrew Walker takes a closer look at the picture across the various countries that use the Euro. And with Spain and Portugal among the strongest performing economies, Jorge Trader, who manages those countries at the European Tourism Association, tells us what recovery looks like in his sector. Also in the programme, a new assessment from the central bank of South Korea says the North Korean economy has suffered its sharpest decline in more than 20 years. Peter Ward of Seoul National University in South Korea discusses the figures and explains how estimates of North Korean economic activity are made. Mental health care apps have boomed in popularity during the pandemic. The BBC's Tamasin Ford asks if they are as good as face-to-face treatment, and explores privacy concerns. Plus, the Hollywood star Scarlett Johansson is suing Disney for breach of contract after it streamed her film Black Widow at the same time as its cinema release, arguing that the move deprived her of potential earnings. Anna Nicolaou is US media correspondent for the Financial Times and considers the prospects for the case.
29
JUL
5pm

Update: President Biden announces vaccine requirement for US federal workers

US President Biden has announced federal employees will be required to get a Covid vaccine or submit to regular testing in order to work. The announcement comes as US economic growth for the second quarter brought the economy back to pre-pandemic levels. We'll hear from Liz Ann Sonders of Charles Schwab and Cary Leahy of Decision Economics. Also in the programme, thirty years after the overthrow of President Siad Barre in Somalia, the country is still struggling to rebuild. We take a closer look at its prospects, the BBC's James Clayton gets an inside look into a gas-powered cryptocurrency mine.
29
JUL
11am

US economic recovery continues

US economic growth for the second quarter brought the economy back to pre-pandemic levels. The BBC's Samira Hussain talks us through the latest data, and we get analysis from Dr Steve Hanke, professor of applied economics at Johns Hopkins University. Also in the programme, thirty years after the overthrow of President Siad Barre in Somalia, the country is still struggling to rebuild. We take a closer look at its prospects, and Professor Laura Hammond of the School of Oriental and African Studies explains the country's current situation. Somalia is rapidly building an online economy, and Mohamed Abdala Mohamud talks us through the Faras Online Market. And Abdalah Abdullahi Mohamud of Somalia's largest telecoms provider Hormuud, which is behind the popular money transfer app EVC+, explains how Somalia has become a near-cashless society. Plus, the BBC's Russell Padmore reports on how the pandemic has impacted the finances of Europe's football clubs.
28
JUL
7pm

Update: Trillion dollar plan for US almost agreed

Roads and building are amongst the things that could get a boost in the US's latest infrastructure plan, if approved by both parties. Facebook says that it made a bumper revenue in the past three months, but with lower than expected earnings anticipated in the coming months, we find out from Dan Ives what that could do to the company's future - and what it means in the larger tech market. Plus, the US's central bank, the Federal Reserve, says that for now, it will keep interest rates on hold, allowing the country's economy to benefit from cheaper money as it recovers post pandemic.
28
JUL
11am

US tech sees giant profits

Apple, Google's parent Alphabet and Microsoft made $57bn profits in the past three months. Kathleen Brooks is the director of Minerva Analysis, and explains why the US technology giants are performing so strongly. Also in the programme, we find out why the US pharmaceutical firm Pfizer is expecting to make significantly more money from its coronavirus vaccine than previously expected. The toy maker Mattel, known for its Barbie dolls, says it will have to raise prices in the run up to Christmas. Gary Grant, founder and chairman of toy retailer The Entertainer discusses the implications. Plus, as the world emerges from the pandemic, experts are predicting a wave of resignations, as millions of people reconsider what job they should be doing. The BBC's Rebecca Kesby asks whether power now lies with workers who might want a change.
27
JUL
6pm

Update: Google posts record financial successes

Record sales and revenue as Google's owner Alphabet beats expectations. We hear more about how the tech giant has recovered post-pandemic. We also look at the latest on the global inequality in covid vaccines from the International Monetary Fund's Petya Koeva Brooks.
27
JUL
11am

Chinese technology shares fall

As investors fret about China's crackdown on tech firms, share prices continue to fall. David Kuo is co-founder of the Smart Investor website in Singapore, and explains the background. Also in the programme, we take a close look at prospects for the US's African Growth and Opportunity Act, which gives many African exporters tariff free access to the US, and faces renegotiation ahead of its expiry in four years' time. Pankaj Bedi is chair of Kenya's United Aryan EPZ which has been a beneficiary of the accord. Ekart Naumann is an economist at South Africa's Trade Law Centre and discusses the impact AGOA has had in Africa. And we hear what might replace AGOA from former Assistant US Trade Representative, Rosa Whitaker. Plus, the Qatar Goodwood Festival horse racing event runs until Saturday, and is the first major racing event to be held in the UK since all coronavirus restrictions were lifted just over a week ago. Adam Waterworth is managing director of the event and tells us how the races will differ from those that happened before the pandemic hit.
26
JUL
6pm

Update: Sales at luxury goods group LVMH up 84%

The world's biggest luxury brand made sales of $17 billion in the three months to June. Its sale for the first half of the year were also 11% higher than pre-pandemic levels. Julie Zerbo is the founder and editor of The Fashion Law website and tells us how LVMH has survived the pandemic.
And independent economic analyst Peter Jankowskis tells us about the latest earnings reports from Tesla and Hasbro.

38 episodes

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