Subscribe to this channel

You can subscribe to new audio episodes published on this channel. You can follow updates using the channel's RSS feed, or via other audio platforms you may already be using.

RSS Feed

You can use any RSS feed reader to follow updates, even your browser. We recommend using an application dedicated to listening podcasts for the best experience. iOS users can look at Overcast or Castro. Pocket Casts is also very popular and has both iOS and Android versions. Add the above link to the application to follow this podcast channel.

Signup to iono.fm

Sign up for a free iono.fm user account to start building your playlist of podcast channels. You'll be able to build a personalised RSS feed you can follow or listen with our web player.
14
OCT
11am

Stephen Schwarzman talks to World Business Report

We talk to the billionaire chief executive of one of the world's biggest investment firms. What's the secret behind the success of Stephen Schwarzman and Blackstone? And how does Mr Schwarzman counter the criticism that his private equity company sacrifices long-term prosperity for short term financial gain? Also in the programme, Poland's governing Law and Justice party has claimed victory in Sunday's election. Jan Sienski from Politico was covering the count in Warsaw and tells us pledges to boost welfare spending partly explain the party's success. Plus our regular workplace commentator, Pilita Clark of the Financial Times, asks whether it's ever acceptable to swear in the office.

(Picture: Stephen Schwarzman. Picture credit: Getty Images.)
13
OCT
9pm

Polish governing party set for election victory

The ruling Law and Justice party has clashed with the European Commission over migration and its attempts to gain more control over the judiciary. We ask the BBC's Adam Easton why the party is so popular with the electorate. Also in the programme, we speak to one Irish business owner about the potential costs of a hard Brexit. We also ask Professor Sarah Smith, chair of the Royal Economics Society women's committee, why it's important to get people from a range of backgrounds interested in the dismal science.
11
OCT
11am

The challenge of dams

Whilst providing clean power, building a dam has significant environmental impacts. Ercan Ayboga is a campaigner with the Save Hasankeyf movement, and tells us why his organisation hoped to prevent the Turkish town of Hasankeyf being flooded by a dam project. Dr Barnaby Dye of Manchester University works with the Future Dams International research consortium, and discusses best practice in dam building. And Pai Deetes is a campaigner with International Rivers, who questions the purported benefits of dam construction for people local to new projects. Also in the programme, French carmaker Renault has replaced its chief executive with immediate effect. Our reporter Theo Leggett tells us what was behind the move. Plus as voters in Poland prepare to head to the polls this weekend, we take a look at the economic issues that have emerged during the campaign.
10
OCT
6pm

13th round of US-China trade talks under way

China and the US resumed trade talks in Washington on Thursday against a backdrop of heightened diplomatic tension. We get the latest from Bloomberg's Jenny Leonard in Washington, DC. Plus we examine the trade talks' impact on day's trading on Wall Street with Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in New York.
10
OCT
12pm

Does blockchain live up to the hype?

Blockchain is a technology behind cryptocurrency Bitcoin, but does it have other uses? Jessi Baker is founder of tech startup Provenance, and explains how the firm uses blockchain as a way of verifying the supply chain of companies selling products such as food and fashion. Avivah Litan of technology research company Gartner tells us where blockchain currently stands in its conception of the HypeCycle, which it uses to describe the life cycle of many new technologies. And we get wider context from Richard Johnson, financial technology expert at Greenwich Associates in New York. Also in the programme, Apple has removed a mapping app from its app store in response to concern from China that it was being used by protesters in Hong Kong to target and ambush police officers. Mary Hui is a reporter in Hong Kong for the business publication Quartz and brings us the story. Plus on World Mental Health Day, the American comedian, author and mental health campaigner Ruby Wax tells us what companies can do to help their employees in this area.
09
OCT
11am

Corporate sponsorship under pressure

We look in depth at the funding relationship between corporate sponsors and the arts. Last week in the UK in response to protests, the National Theatre ended its relationship with Shell, and the Royal Shakespeare Company pulled out of a funding deal with BP. The BBC's arts editor Will Gompertz tells us how significant corporate sponsorship is to arts organisations. We hear from a campaigner who has been targeting corporate sponsorship. Ros Sheldon of reputation management company Igniyte discusses how damaging it is for a brand when sponsorship is ended. And Bryan de Lottinville, founder and chief executive of Benevity, explains how companies in the United States are changing the way they choose to donate. Also in the programme, Turkey has begun an offensive in northern Syria. US president Donald Trump has threatened sanctions against Turkey depending on how the conflict plays out. Can Selcuki is general manager of Istanbul Economics Research, and considers the impact any sanctions might have on Turkey's economy. Plus a week after legislation in India to ban single-use plastics was shelved, we look at the political fall out.

(Picture: A protest against corporate sponsorship. Picture credit: Getty Images.)
08
OCT
6pm

IMF and World Bank warn of deteriorating global outlook

The new leaders of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank have warned of a deteriorating global economic outlook. Today the World Bank published its World 2020 Development Report and we speak to its Chief Economist, Penny Goldberg. And trade talks have the power to shake the markets, as we hear from Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading in New Jersey.
08
OCT
11am

EU strengthens whistleblower protections

EU states have two years to bring in agreed new legal protection for whistleblowers. Robert McCoy is one such person who exposed systemic fraud over the award of contracts in the European Union, and tells us about the toll it took on his life to come forward. Virginie Roziere is a former Member of the European Parliament, who helped steer the new legislation through its various stages, and explains how complainants will be protected in Europe. And we hear from Paul Boyle, who was chief audit officer for the insurance firm Aviva, and is now chairman of the trustees at Protect, which has helped 40,000 workers raise concerns. Also in the programme, as the UK draws closer to the 31st October Brexit date, our reporter heads to a government-run roadshow event to hear what businesses should be doing to prepare. Plus, we hear from Dr Stuart Keel of the World Health Organisation about the possible negative impact on our eyesight of spending too much time indoors staring at screens.
07
OCT
7pm

Update: General Motors strike knocks US economy

The strike has shut down GM production in the United States, as well as affecting its operations in Canada and Mexico. And a shortage of pork in China leaves US farmers sniffing for potential big orders coming their way. Plus, we hear what how the global stock markets responded to the tailwinds, from Peter Jankowskis of Oakbrook Investments in Illinois.

38 episodes

« Back 1—12 More »