World Business Report

BBC  |  Podcast , ±15 min episodes every 18 hours
Analysis of the big global business and economic issues, as they affect consumers and investors. Broadcast on weekdays.
22
SEP
11am

UK to be EU's Strongest Friend - May

In a major speech the UK prime minister Theresa May aimed to break Brexit deadlock. We discuss her proposals with Allie Renison of the Institute of Directors, and John Mills, founder of consumer goods company JML. Also in the programme, our reporter Rob Young is in Germany ahead of Sunday's federal elections. Ride-hailing app Uber will lose its licence to operate in London when it expires this month. We hear about the possible impact on Uber drivers from Andy Chamberlain, deputy director of policy at the Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed. Plus we look back at the rest of the week's big business stories with Stephanie Baker, global business correspondent at Bloomberg in London, and Charlotte Howard of The Economist in New York.
21
SEP
11am

Germany Election: the Impact of Rising Rents

Ahead of Sunday's election, we hear why Germans are worried about rising rents. We get analysis from Jeremy Cliffe, Berlin bureau chief of The Economist. Also in the programme, we find out about Ryanair's latest attempts to solve its pilot crisis. The mayor of Uganda's capital Kampala has been arrested in the middle of a television interview. Nebert Rugadya of Radio One in Kampala tells us why. Plus as a French chef says he's decided to return his three Michelin stars, we talk to Stephen Terry, head chef of the Hardwick in Wales about why he refuses to let Michelin inspectors into his restaurant.
20
SEP
11am

Tata and ThyssenKrupp Agree Steel Merger

The tie-up will lead to job losses, to be shared between the two companies. We get analysis from steel industry expert Jonathan Aylen of Manchester Business School. Also in the programme, we hear why Kenya's Supreme Court decided to cancel the result of last month's presidential election. We continue our series examining the health of the German economy ahead of Sunday's election, with a report from Munich. The OECD's chief economist, Catherine Mann, tells us that as more women enter the global workforce, it may be depressing pay levels. Plus, the authorities in Portugal's capital Lisbon have invested €12,000 in a luxury pigeon hotel. Joana Antunes helps to maintain the facility, and tells us why it was worth the expense.
19
SEP
11am

Toys R Us Files For Bankruptcy in US

The struggling retailer has filed for bankruptcy as it attempts to restructure its debts. We get analysis from toy expert Jim Silver of website TTPM.com. Also in the programme, as the US Federal Reserve meets to discuss the next move for interest rates, our regular economic commentator Roger Bootle of Capital Economics tells us what board members will be discussing. We have a report on moves by the Missionaries of Charity to trademark an item of clothing closely associated with Saint Teresa, formerly known as Mother Teresa of Calcutta. We hear about changes to health care provision in Angola. Plus we head to a beer festival in London to find out about the rise of micro-breweries.
18
SEP
11am

Ryanair Flight Cancellations Hit Holidaymakers

Ryanair is grounding hundreds of flights in a bid to improve punctuality. Travel expert Alan Bowen tells us what triggered the move. Also in the programme, material from Qatari news organisation Al Jazeera has been blocked on Snapchat in Saudi Arabia. Al Jazeera's executive director of digital, Dr Yaser Bishr describes the impact. The Gambia is to hire private companies to patrol its waters and prevent illegal fishing. Steven Akester of the sustainable fisheries consultancy MacAlister Elliott explains how big the problem is in west Africa. We have a report from Dresden in former East Germany on the health of the region's economy, ahead of this weekend's general election. Plus we hear whether live video gaming might become part of the Olympic Games of the future.
17
SEP
8pm

President Trump Prepares to Address UN

Donald Trump will address the General Assembly of the United Nations on Tuesday about cutting costs and reforming the organisation. Russell Padmore asks Martin Wolf from the Financial Times what he expects to hear. A row over subsidies between the Canadian aircraft maker Bombardier and Boeing of the US threatens to create a new trade rift between Washington and Ottawa. We ask global trade expert Simon Lester from the Cato Institute for his perspective. Also in the programme, the EU is accused of allowing illegal fishing by European ships off the coast of West Africa. Beth Lowell from Oceana says it's damaging the economies of poorer countries. And, with the Emmy Awards taking place in Los Angeles, we talk to Georg Szalai from the Hollywood Reporter about how competition from video streaming services like Amazon Prime and Netflix is shaking up the television industry.
15
SEP
11am

KPMG Clears Out South African Bosses

Accountancy firm KPMG has removed the leadership team of its South African arm. The move comes after an internal investigation into work it did for the Gupta family, as Verashni Pillay of Power 987 in Johannesburg explains. Also in the programme, pressure from the Beijing government has forced China's leading bitcoin exchanges to close. Simon Taylor is co-founder of 11FS consultancy and tells us why authorities in China are cracking down on crypto-currencies. A handheld DNA tester is helping farmers protect cassava crops. We find out more from Dr Laura Boykin of the University of Western Australia, and Dr Titus Alichai, from the National Agricultural Research Organisation in Kampala, Uganda. We have a report on the latest business trends at London Fashion Week. Plus we look back at the rest of the week's big business news with Anna Nicolaou of the Financial Times in New York, and Richard Cockett, Britain business editor of The Economist in London.(Picture: A KPMG logo. Picture credit: PA.)

39 episodes

« Back 1—12 More »