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16
JUN
8pm

Carole Ghosn claims husband's arrest is a 'conspiracy'

Carole Ghosn, the wife of Carlos Ghosn has told the BBC the arrest of the former Nissan and Renault chairman was a conspiracy. Nissan disputes the claim, arguing there is substantial evidence against him. Carole Ghosn, speaking to the BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York, explained that she is appealing to Donald Trump to apply pressure over her husband's legal battle.

Electricity is being restored gradually to Argentina and Uruguay after a blackout left 48,000,000 people without power. We hear from Natalio Cosoy in Buenos Aires.

UK media companies are increasingly going to court to block people illegally uploading their content online according to figures from law firm RPC. A partner at the firm, Ben Mark tells us more and we also speak to technology analyst Bethan Vincent.

A proposal to build a hydroelectric power station on the River Nile has alarmed the Ugandan tourism industry because the project will be constructed near the picturesque Murchison Falls. We hear from Nebert Rugadya, business editor at Radio One in Kampala.

The UK and China are allowing companies listed on the London Stock Exchange and firms listed at its counterpart in Shanghai to trade shares on both financial markets. Our regular economic commentator Michael Hughes tells us how this will benefit British and Chinese companies.

Pic description: Carlos Ghosn and his wife Carole
Pic credit: Getty Images/Dominique Charriau
13
JUN
6pm

Update: US blames Iran for Gulf of Oman explosions

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has blamed Iran for "unprovoked attacks" on two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman. He said the US had made its assessment based on intelligence about the type of weapons used. Ilan Goldenberg is Middle East Security Director at the Center for New American Security. He tells us what this could mean for the larger geopolitics of the region. Also in the programme, decades-old rent control legislation is under review in New York, with legislators expected to tilt the balance in favour of renters. Vivian Wang of the New York Times gives us the details. And we'll have our regular view on the US markets with Andrew Husby of Decision Economics in New York.
12
JUN
6pm

Update: Lego searches for an alternative to plastic

Danish toy company Lego is reportedly struggling to come up with a non-petrol based brick.The company has been seeking out ways to create its iconic brick out of a plant-based material, over concerns about the environmental impact of the estimated 75 billion sold annually. Dave Shefick from the website The Brothers Brick has been to Lego's headquarters to try out some of their prototypes.

Plus, we'll also have a regular view on the US markets with Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago.
12
JUN
11am

The future of the video games industry

As the biggest event for video games, E3, opens in Los Angeles we look at gaming's future. We hear from Tomaso and Nicolo Portunato, who run the Platform gaming bar in London. And we discuss concerns that gaming can be addictive with Belinda Parmar, who has set up a campaign group called Truth about Tech, and Kieran Holmes-Darby, managing director of Excel Esports, which enters professional teams into hugely popular online competitions including League of Legends and World of Warcraft. Also in the programme, as the US Congress begins a formal investigation into the market dominance of the technology giants of Silicon Valley, our regular contributor, New York-based business journalist Diane Brady, tells us if she thinks the likes of Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Google have a case to answer. Plus we ask whether more governments should follow Bhutan's lead and use the happiness of their citizens as a key measure of success, rather than economic growth. Tshoki Zangmo is a senior researcher for Bhutan's National Happiness Commission.
11
JUN
6pm

Congress takes on Big Tech over antitrust

The US Congress has just wrapped up the first day of an investigation into alleged anti-competitive behaviour. Avery Gardiner of the Center for Democracy & Technology in Washington DC breaks down what congress is looking to find. Also in the show, we ask whether clothing retailers are doing enough to minimise their environmental impact. Plus we hear about the increasingly widespread use of facial recognition technology in China.
10
JUN
6pm

Update: Mexico-US deal keeps US markets buoyant

Carmakers are among those stocks doing well as the US postpones tariffs on Mexican goods - we hear about the day's trading from Peter Jankovskis of Oakbrook Investments in Chicago. Plus, we speak to the Nobel Prize-winning professor who says early years education spending has an impact on later generations.
10
JUN
11am

Trump warns on Mexico tariffs

If an immigration deal falters, President Trump says Mexico could still face new tariffs. The BBC's Will Grant in Mexico City explains what is known about the terms of the deal, whilst the former American ambassador to Mexico, Earl Anthony Wayne, tells us the US should not have threatened to disrupt trade to force a deal on immigration. Also in the programme, Indian prime minister Narendra Modi has made his first foreign trip since re-election last month, to the Maldives and Sri Lanka. It's seen by many as an attempt to prise those neighbours away from the growing influence of China. We find out more from Gareth Price, senior research fellow at the policy institute Chatham House in London. Plus in an era of digitalisation, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan discusses the enduring appeal of business cards.

(Picture: Migrants crossing from central America into Mexico. Picture credit: AFP.)
09
JUN
8pm

Hong Kong protesters oppose extradition bill

Hundreds of thousands of people have demonstrated against China's controversial bill, which would allow suspected criminals to be sent to mainland China to be put on trial. We get the latest from the BBC's Martin Yip. As trade tensions continue between China and the US, we ask whether China's tariffs on its exports of rare earth metals could turn into a complete ban altogether. Jim Kennedy, founder of Three Consulting and a rare earth metal expert, tells us about the implications of this. And as Ethiopia prepares to liberalise its telecom sector, we speak to African telecom expert Arthur Goldstuck.
07
JUN
11am

Russia seeks foreign investors

Kirill Dmitriev is chief executive of the Russian Direct Investment Fund, and tells us what sort of deals are being struck. And we hear from Henry Foy, Moscow bureau chief of the Financial Times, how the house arrest of American businessman Michael Calvey on fraud charges caused the US ambassador to Moscow to stay away from the event. Also in the programme, as the women's football World Cup gets under way in France, sports journalist Florence Lloyd-Hughes discusses the significant disparity in rates of pay between men and women playing the game. Plus our reporter looks at how songs in languages other than English are making more of an impact on the international music scene.
06
JUN
12pm

Football finance in the spotlight

As football finance hits the headlines, we take a look at how money influences the game. BBC football reporter Simon Stone explains why Manchester City is accused by the European governing body UEFA of having too much money pumped into it by its Abu Dhabi owners. Meanwhile Sepp Blatter, who was the head of the world football governing body FIFA for 17 years, tells us why he's sceptical about the effectiveness of UEFA's financial fair play rules. Also in the programme, a planned tie-up between Fiat Chrysler and Renault has fallen through, whilst Ford has announced the closure of an engine plant in the UK. We look at the wider implications for the industry with Anna-Marie Baisden, head of autos research at Fitch Solutions. Plus Denmark has elected its youngest ever prime minister. We find out what a return to the Social Democrats will mean for the country's business community.

39 episodes

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