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13
AUG

Update: US Index reaching highs again

The Standard & Poor's index is reaching highs it hasn't seen for weeks, as investor confidence bounces. We hear from Ivan Feinseth from Tigress Financial Intelligence in the US about the latest. Plus, we hear why 'mansplaining' remains such a problem in the workplace, with Nicole Tersigni, author of 'Men to Avoid in Art and Life'.
13
AUG

US holds off on tariff hike in EU Airbus fight

The US will keep tariffs on $7.5bn worth of items including French cheese and whiskies. Giorgio Leali is trade reporter for Politico Europe, and has been following the dispute. And Alice O'Donovan is from Eucolait, which represents many of Europe's dairy companies, and describes the impact on Irish butter producers. Also in the programme, tourism businesses have written to the leaders of the G7 largest industrialised economies to ask for international co-operation to save the industry. Tom Jenkins is from the European Tour Operators Association, and tells us how much bookings are down by. The conference industry has also been heavily hit by the coronavirus pandemic, and the BBC's Jane Wakefield explores whether the idea of virtual conferences will offer a lifeline to the sector. Plus, with theatre on Broadway in New York shut down until 2021, we hear about the implications for the performers, set designers, stage managers and others who contribute to live productions.
12
AUG

Update: UK recession

We hear from economist Lee Hopley about the intricacies of the UK's new recession. Plus, the US stock markets are rounded up for us by Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors, plus we look at the death of Sumner Redstone, media mogul.
12
AUG

UK in recession for first time in 11 years

The UK has suffered its biggest slump on record, under "unprecedented" conditions. We find out how business is going from Sarah Davis, director of a wedding venue, and Rob Brown, managing director of a company exporting specialist industrial lubricants to more than 90 countries. And we get wider context from Simon French, chief economist at Panmure Gordon. Also in the programme, millions of Americans face loss of benefits and eviction, after Congress failed to extend the CARES Act. The economic and human repercussions could be devastating, as the BBC's Ed Butler reports. Plus, adverts that track consumer behaviour through mobile phones could soon be coming to a billboard in Europe near you, as William Eccleshare, chief executive of advertising company Clear Channel, explains.
11
AUG

Belarus's economic woes

Protests after a disputed election in Belarus come against a backdrop of economic woes. An opposition news website claims a general strike has started in protest at the election result, and Katsiaryna Shmatsina of the Belarusian Institute for Strategic Studies tells us if she's seen any evidence of such a strike in Minsk today. And we find out how the country's economy has developed since the fall of the Soviet Union, from Chris Weafer, chief executive of the economic consultancy Macro Advisory. Also in the programme, critics of make-up brands around the world say they don't cater enough for darker skin tones, and if they do, the products are often more expensive and harder to get hold of. Ruby Hammer is a make-up artist and adviser to the British Beauty Council, and discusses why cosmetic brands don't make more darker skin tones. And we get wider context from Padma Lakshmi, an Indian model living in the United States, and Lorraine Candy, editor of the Sunday Times Style Magazine. Plus, the live music industry has been devastated by the pandemic. But the UK's first socially-distant concert takes place today, at Newcastle Racecourse in north-east England, and Ali O'Reilly from concert organiser Virgin Money explains how it works.

(Picture: A protest in Minsk, Belarus. Picture credit: EPA.)
10
AUG

Update: McDonald's sues former boss over alleged employee relationships

The fast food chain claims Steve Easterbrook had relationships with four staff, and has accused him of lying about them. Mr Easterbrook was fired last year and McDonald's is now trying to recover some of his $40 million pay-off. New York Times reporter David Enrich has been covering the story.
Hong Kong tycoon Jimmy Lai was arrested over allegations of collusion with foreign forces. BBC business reporter Andrew Wood is based there, and discusses Mr Lai's businesses and his impact on Hong Kong. And we get wider context from Allan Zeman, a property developer who is an economic adviser to the city's leader Carrie Lam, and has known Jimmy Lai for decades.
Also in the programme, a thousand tonnes of oil have spilled out of a Japanese-owned ship which ran aground near Mauritius 15 days ago. Vassen Kauppay-Muthoo is an oceanologist in Mauritius who has spent the past few days on the island's beaches, and explains the implications.
Plus the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson has been talking to some very wealthy people to find out whether there is something about the inner psyche that makes us natural savers or spenders.
10
AUG

Media tycoon Lai arrested under HK security law

Hong Kong tycoon Jimmy Lai was arrested over allegations of collusion with foreign forces. BBC business reporter Andrew Wood is based there, and discusses Mr Lai's businesses and his impact on Hong Kong. And we get wider context from Allan Zeman, Chairman of the Lan Kwai Fong Group and an economic adviser to the city's leader Carrie Lam, who has known Jimmy Lai for decades. Also in the programme, a thousand tonnes of oil have spilled out of a Japanese-owned ship which ran aground near Mauritius 15 days ago. Vassen Kauppay-Muthoo is an oceanologist in Mauritius who has spent the past few days on the island's beaches, and explains the implications. Plus the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson has been talking to some very wealthy people to find out whether there is something about the inner psyche that makes us natural savers or spenders.

(Picture: Jimmy Lai being arrested. Picture credit: EPA.)
09
AUG

Donors pledge aid for Lebanon

International donors have pledged a quarter of a billion euros in aid for Lebanon five days after the explosion which devastated a swathe of Beirut. But an online donor summit arranged by France called at the same time for reforms to be made. The blast at a warehouse holding over 2,000 tonnes of ammonium nitrate has focused local outrage on perceived government corruption and incompetence.
Clashes have broken out for a second day running in Beirut. We ask how can Lebanon get out of this crisis?

Also in the programme, what is behind Saudi Aramco's sharp fall in profits?

Plus - we hear from a "farmer influencer" and You Tube star Morgan Gold.
07
AUG

Update: US Jobs stimulus talks break down

On today’s programme we take a look at the US jobs market, as the latest monthly figures are published, and New York Times reporter Emily Badger explains why the end of the federal enhanced unemployment benefit system disproportionately hits black Americans. We’ll also wrap up the week on the US markets with Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading in New Jersey. And we'll hear from our sister programme Marketplace about how the coronavirus pandemic is shifting attitudes towards service robots.
06
AUG

Update: New York's Attorney General takes aim at the NRA

New York's attorney general has announced a lawsuit aimed at dissolving the powerful National Rifle Association over alleged financial mismanagement. Robert Spitzer, Political Science professor at SUNY Cortland and author of The Politics of Gun Control, explains the allegations and how the notorious gun lobby’s political influence has waned. Also in the programme, we’ll have a regular view on the US markets from Chris Low of FHN Financial.
06
AUG

Beirut reconstruction could cost up to $15bn

The governor of Beirut has estimated reconstruction of the city could cost up to $15bn. Dr Zahira Harb of London's City University was injured in Tuesday's blast, and tells us the people of the city are deeply fed up with their political leaders. And we hear about concerns over food imports to Lebanon given the destruction of the port, from Hani Bohsali, owner and chief executive of Bohsali Foods, who also heads the Syndicate of Food and Drink Importers. Also in the programme, an in-depth look at how coronavirus is impacting Africa. Dr Mary Stephen is from WHO Africa, from Brazzaville in the Congo. Kogmotso Phatsima of educational and flying academy Dare to Dream discusses the impact on tourism in Botswana. And Bismarck Rewane, economist and member of company boards, including at First City Monument Bank and Guinness Nigeria, tells us about how the pandemic is affecting Nigerian firms and families.

(Picture: Beirut's destroyed port area. Picture credit: Reuters.)

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