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05
JUL
3am

Are you feeling burned out? Here is how to know the signs

Burnout is classified as an occupational phenomenon that results when stress related to one’s work is not managed correctly. Maverick Life spoke to an expert in employee wellness who gave some tips to prevent it happening to you.
In 2019, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) classified burnout as an occupational phenomenon “resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed”.
There are three dimensions to burnout, as characterised by the ICD-11:
Emotional exhaustion: feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion;
Depersonalisation: increased mental distance from one’s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one’s job;
Personal accomplishment: a sense of ineffectiveness and lack of accomplishment.
These symptoms may resemble depression, but it is important to distinguish between them.
“Some of it manifests like depression, and the two often co-occur. But actually, these are two separate diagnoses, explains Gina Görgens-Ekermans, who specialises in employee health and wellbeing and is an associate professor in the department of Industrial Psychology at Stellenbosch University. “Depression would typically span across all life domains, whereas burnout is very specifically linked to your workplace.”
To better understand burnout, social psychologist Christina Maslach and her colleagues developed the Maslach Burnout Inventory in 1981, defining burnout as a “syndrome of emotional exhaustion and cynicism that occurs frequently among individuals who do ‘people-work’”. Maslach’s research found that people with burnout would develop the three symptoms in succession.
First comes emotional exhaustion, where employees feel overextended by their work. Then, people with burnout go on to develop cynicism or depersonalisation, which manifest prominently in interactions with others, where burnt-out employees distance themselves from clients and aren’t emotionally involved anymore, Görgens-Ekermans explains. Eventually, that will then result in reduced personal efficacy, where employees are no longer satisfied with past or present accomplishments and have low expectations of their continued effectiveness at work.
“You see this process of extreme mental exhaustion, where you can’t get up in the morning, you can’t face another day, you’re very low and completely overwhelmed,” says Görgens-Ekermans. “It then progresses to this idea that ‘I can’t interact with clients anymore, I can’t gauge the emotional content of what the client is saying and I cannot respond adequately’. Eventually, it becomes reduced personal efficacy, where a person was previously performing well and now their performance starts to drop.”
What causes burnout?
In explaining the development of burnout, Görgens-Ekermans refers to a theory called the Job Demands–Resources theory, which posits that demanding jobs are not necessarily the cause ...
04
JUL
2pm

The Loch Ness monster: a modern history

Recent sightings of the Loch Ness monster have led to renewed speculation about its origins
Reports of Loch Ness monster sightings keep coming. The latest report, accompanied by a video, is of a 20-30ft long creature occasionally breaking the water’s surface. Although the video clearly shows a moving v-shaped wake it does not reveal the underlying source. The witnesses certainly saw something, but what?
There have been over 85 theories of what the Loch Ness monster is, ranging from the prosaic (wind slicks, reflections, plant debris and boat wakes) to the zoological implausible (anacondas, killer whales and the ocean sunfish) to the frankly bonkers (ghost dinosaurs). The people who came up with these theories were not necessarily that familiar with the loch.
Many early suggestions by foreign zoologists implied they thought the loch was saltwater, which explains suggestions of sunfishes, whales, sharks and rays. Some theories have been reinvented independently, showing the ingenuity of each generation of Nessie inventors. For example, the idea that the Loch Ness monster was originally a swimming elephant from a visiting circus, resurfaced three times, in 1934, 1979 and 2005. Each time, the person claimed the idea was original.
Nessie the reptile
However, it was the notion of the Loch Ness monster as a prehistoric reptile that really captured the public’s imagination in the 1930s. Nessie’s modern genesis really started in April 1933. The first eyewitness reports of a strange animal in the loch started in 1930.
Yet it would only be in August of 1933 that witness George Spicer, who saw Nessie on land, first suggested that the creature was a reptile. Until then informed commentators assumed that if there was an animal in the loch, it was some sort of vagrant freshwater animal like a seal that had made its way from the Moray Firth. Spicer just described it as a prehistoric reptile. He claimed it had a long neck which allowed a journalist five days later to suggest it was a plesiosaur, a type of long-necked marine reptile from the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. One (but not the only one) popular image of the Loch Ness monster was born.
The fact that the plesiosaur image of Nessie arose in August 1933 casts doubt on Daniel Loxton and Donald Prothero’s (2013) theory Nessie originated with the highly popular 1933 King Kong film with its portrayal of a man-eating, long-necked, swamp-dwelling reptile. It’s more likely that King Kong only influenced rather ...
04
JUL
12pm

Want to swim like a mermaid? Now you can

Mermaid swimming is gaining popularity in South Africa as more people are dipping their toes into this fantastical activity.
Mermaids have been known in legend and folklore across various cultures for centuries. The ancient Syrian deity Atargatis is one of the earliest likenesses to mermaids known; human above the waist with a fish tail below, and believed to be the goddess of fertility. Mermaids continued to appear in myth through the ages, but perhaps the most popular mercreature, aka a creature of the sea, is Hans Christian Andersen’s The Little Mermaid from his 1837 fairytale. Disney’s 1989 film of the same name further entrenched the mythical creature in popular culture, creating a fantasy in the minds of generations.
What if mermaids existed? Better yet, what would it be like to be a mermaid? As it turns out, the fairy tale might just be in reach as mermaid swimming makes a splash in the world of aquatics, and South Africans are now diving head first into the trend.
The sport involves swimming with a custom mermaid tail using a dolphin-like technique as the feet kick in the tail and the hands make sculling movements. A full-body wave-like movement called a “dolphin kick” is the main way to propel the swimmer.
“Mermaiding is generally recommended for experienced swimmers, as swimming with feet kept together is more difficult and can be tricky if you’re not used to it. We use the dolphin kick as our main stroke in the water, using your hips and legs to propel you forward. This is aided by a monofin, which is a single fin that keeps your feet together when you swim,” explains Dana Cato, a mermaid and owner of Two Oceans Mermaid Tails.
What equipment do you need?
Real-life “mermaids” wear a tail and a monofin often made from scuba knit or spandex, which are usually colourful and designed to look just like an exaggerated fish tail.
“My tails are made of fabric which has the design printed directly into it. I use a thick swimsuit fabric called scuba knit, which is softer and thicker than standard swimsuit spandex and has a more luxurious feel to it. I try to offer tails for a variety of swimmers with different styles of tails to ensure there is something for everyone,” Cato says.
Cato started her business selling mermaid tails in 2020 and has a variety of styles, sizes and designs for sale.
“I started making tails ...
04
JUL
11am

Spiderhead: Blunt and bound up in convention

Netflix movie Spiderhead, starring Chris Hemsworth, Miles Teller and Jurnee Smollett, has all the ingredients to rank among top-tier dystopian sci-fi — at least on paper.
The mark of good science fiction is something that’s thought-provoking, entwining mystery and credible predictions about our future in such a way that it draws the audience in and leads to self-reflection about ourselves and our world.
On paper, Netflix’s Spiderhead has all the ingredients to rank among this kind of top-tier sci-fi — a dark, edgy and insightful film that lingers in the mind, and gets played over and over, long after viewing.
Based on a short story by George Saunders, Spiderhead, directed by Joseph Kosinski, is set in a sunny near-future dystopia. In exchange for greater freedoms at tropical island institution Spiderhead, prisoners have volunteered themselves as pharmaceutical guinea pigs. Every day they are subjected to mind-altering drugs by eccentric scientist Steve Abnesti (Chris Hemsworth) and his sidekick Mark (Mark Paguio). Jeff (Miles Teller) and Lizzy (Jurnee Smollett) are just two of the inmates who have accepted this deal, but as Steve’s experiments become more extreme, Jeff grows suspicious about what is really going on.
This is a rich scenario to explore, and with Joseph Kosinski, fresh off his Top Gun: Maverick success, behind the camera, Spiderhead seems primed for success. Except the film does little with its solid foundation. It’s an oddly unambitious and constrained effort, keeping its focus on Jeff, oddball Steve, and Lizzy, in that order of importance.
Spiderhead is so micro-focused, in fact, that the far more intriguing macro is neglected. The only topic explored in any depth is the guilt that could drive people to accept unregulated experimentation as a punishment. Again, though, that is individual-focused. Presumably, the audience is supposed to be so invested in these characters that they don’t ask the bigger questions. Viewers are encouraged to just follow an obviously frayed plot thread to the big reveal.
In reaching that point, however, anyone with open eyes will recognise the missed opportunities for something “more.” Considering how well Orange is the New Black spotlighted the perils of prison privatisation, Spiderhead doesn’t even attempt to comment on the issue. Criminally, it also doesn’t delve into the terrifying concept of instant mood control via phone app. If everyone around you can be manipulated, can you trust them? Can you trust your own feelings and response to situations? Spiderhead is paranoia free, and all ...
04
JUL
11am

The Loch Ness monster: a modern history

Recent sightings of the Loch Ness monster have led to renewed speculation about its origins
Reports of Loch Ness monster sightings keep coming. The latest report, accompanied by a video, is of a 20-30ft long creature occasionally breaking the water’s surface. Although the video clearly shows a moving v-shaped wake it does not reveal the underlying source. The witnesses certainly saw something, but what?
There have been over 85 theories of what the Loch Ness monster is, ranging from the prosaic (wind slicks, reflections, plant debris and boat wakes) to the zoological implausible (anacondas, killer whales and the ocean sunfish) to the frankly bonkers (ghost dinosaurs). The people who came up with these theories were not necessarily that familiar with the loch.
Many early suggestions by foreign zoologists implied they thought the loch was saltwater, which explains suggestions of sunfishes, whales, sharks and rays. Some theories have been reinvented independently, showing the ingenuity of each generation of Nessie inventors. For example, the idea that the Loch Ness monster was originally a swimming elephant from a visiting circus, resurfaced three times, in 1934, 1979 and 2005. Each time, the person claimed the idea was original.
Nessie the reptile
However, it was the notion of the Loch Ness monster as a prehistoric reptile that really captured the public’s imagination in the 1930s. Nessie’s modern genesis really started in April 1933. The first eyewitness reports of a strange animal in the loch started in 1930.
Yet it would only be in August of 1933 that witness George Spicer, who saw Nessie on land, first suggested that the creature was a reptile. Until then informed commentators assumed that if there was an animal in the loch, it was some sort of vagrant freshwater animal like a seal that had made its way from the Moray Firth. Spicer just described it as a prehistoric reptile. He claimed it had a long neck which allowed a journalist five days later to suggest it was a plesiosaur, a type of long-necked marine reptile from the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. One (but not the only one) popular image of the Loch Ness monster was born.
The fact that the plesiosaur image of Nessie arose in August 1933 casts doubt on Daniel Loxton and Donald Prothero’s (2013) theory Nessie originated with the highly popular 1933 King Kong film with its portrayal of a man-eating, long-necked, swamp-dwelling reptile. It’s more likely that King Kong only influenced rather ...
04
JUL
7am

Things to do, places to go

From art exhibitions to festivals, concerts and trail runs – here is your weekly round-up of go-to events around the country.
THEATRE
Gauteng
Roodepoort
Main Theatre at Roodepoort Theatre, 100 Christiaan de Wet Rd, Florida Park
Nozze di Figaro
Theatre fans and Mozart lovers will enjoy this sequel to Il Barbiere di Siviglia. Featuring the talented Conroy Scott, William Berger, Siphamandla Moyake and more, this opera classic has been brought to life on stage once again. Be sure to catch it. Tickets are available on Webtickets.
Dates: 5-15 July 2022
MARKETS
Western Cape
Sedgefield
Cnr N2 & Jan Van Riebeeck St
Wild Oats Community Farmer’s Market
If you’re looking for fresh, locally produced food and a community-focused market, then look no further. For years, this weekly market has prided itself on providing visitors with world-class quality eats, from produce to ready-made meals. All waste from the market is reused and recycled, and support is given to local nature conservancies.
Date: 9 July 2022
Western Cape
Plettenburg Bay
Old Nick Village, N2
Wednesday Market at Old Nick
Tucked away in the delightful, historic Old Nick Village is the weekly Wednesday Market. You can expect to find goods by local traders. From organic fruit and vegetables, to vendors such as Debb & the Dude Clothing, Bluebird Boutique and Sjokolat Brownie Masters, there’s something for everyone of all ages to enjoy.
Date: 13 July 2022
MUSIC
Gauteng
Johannesburg
Untitled Basement, 7 Reserve St
Untitled Basement & The Charles Gene Suite present SUITE NITES The Official Album launch
The wait is finally over. The new Charle Gene Suite album, Suite Nites, is here. Join the dynamic, multi-genre band for their album launch, which will include guest appearances from collaborators such as Noah Love Bamberger and Njo Illa N Phekani, in an intimate setting. Tickets are available via Quicket.
Date: 8 July 2022
Gqeberha
The Music Kitchen, 69 Mangold St, Newton Park
Roan Ash: Until next time
Fans can catch Roan Ash live at the Music Kitchen, for the South African musician’s upcoming farewell concert. You may remember him from The Voice South Africa or have seen him share the stage with other local artists such as Matthew Mole. Roan has made a name for himself with his signature country-blues inspired music. Tickets are available on Quicket.
Date: 14 July 2022
Western Cape
Cape Town
The Alma Café, 20 Alma Rd, Rosebank
Leg End Dairy Boys
Join in on what will be an exploration of music in a “weird and wonderful new way”. If you’re looking for Sunday night plans, you can find them in the groovy tunes of guitarist Jono Tait, ...
01
JUL
1pm

Back to basics with an energised atmosphere at this year’s festival in Makhanda

The festival’s first year since the pandemic has been marked by challenges, but still the show goes on.
As it stages the first live shows since the pandemic began, the National Arts Festival has endured with much perseverance amidst major challenges. However, the streamlined programme – with fewer performances at less venues – does not sacrifice the quality of the work on show.
The night before the festival began, the government lifted mask mandates and limits on gatherings. This meant audiences could return to hundred percent capacity as opposed to the planned fifty percent – in place since 2020. However, this was too late for planning purposes, and some nervous audience members kept their masks on.
The festival is also not insulated from the challenges of its location. The effect of the pandemic and management of the Makhanda municipality is palpably evident in the town’s economic downturn. Decades-old restaurants and bars have closed down, and numerous buildings stand empty. Those that were open, were quiet or empty on most evenings. Even the Long Table restaurant – only open during the festival and normally packed to capacity with artists and audience members – was never too full to become unbearable. There are also major water shortages throughout the area.
Additionally, for the first time in history, the festival had to operate at Level-6 loadshedding. This was an unprecedented logistical nightmare with back-to-back power cuts daily for hours on end. To their credit, many scheduled performances were shifted around to be accommodated. Some venues had generators, others soldiered on without electricity while others cancelled shows. Finding a warm meal between performances is also tricky with power cuts – but audiences have been understanding, taking it in their stride.
An energised atmosphere
The festival’s opening days were quiet with smaller audiences and crowds, but this changed toward the second weekend. The usual bombardment of posters was also missing and the Village Green market has scaled down significantly. In many ways, the festival has gone back to basics.
On the whole, audiences seemed excited and thankful that the festival has returned. They however appeared slow to adapt to the new digital system, missing their usual printed program and often complaining about not finding venues. Having to access phones for tickets, considering data costs and the possibilities of phone batteries dying without easily available charging stations – let alone power sometimes – has also been a site of stress. A purely digital ...
30
JUN
11am

Reinventing Mr. Bean – Rowan Atkinson is back as a silly, likeable character in ‘Man vs. Bee’

British comedian Rowan Atkinson’s new Netflix miniseries turns his beloved, befuddled character, Mr. Bean, into a chap who could actually exist.
Rowan Atkinson is one of the most recognisable and renowned comedy actors in the world, primarily because of two very different roles – the snide and cynical Blackadder of the 1980s British period sitcom, and of course Mr. Bean, the nonverbal, bumbling buffoon who became sensationally popular in the Nineties.
Atkinson hasn’t fully succeeded in replicating the success of either of these antithetical comedy styles in his recent work (the Johnny English franchise which sought to transpose both Bean and Blackadder into an egotistical Austin Powers-style action hero has only cheapened his legacy) but Man vs. Bee is a fresher attempt to reinvent Mr. Bean.
Trevor Bingley is a cheerful but down-on-his-luck divorcee working his first day on the job for Housesitters Deluxe, a company that specialises in looking after very wealthy peoples’ houses. We can feel the Bean-ish charm of this silly, likeable man as soon as we meet him, pressing his ID card to the security camera upside down. He’s well meaning and playful, but clumsy and clearly scatterbrained.
Trevor bears the same sheepish overbite as Mr. Bean, rubs his hands with the same nutty excitement before eating, furrows his brow with that familiar oafish horror at the failure of his exceptionally ill-conceived ideas, and also seems to salvage situations through dumb luck.
But Trevor’s idiocy has been toned down to a level people will believe in 2022. While Bean is a child in a man’s body who’s motivated by selfishness, Trevor is just a ditsy adult trying not to cock things up.
As the pompous, condescending homeowners (Jing Lusi and Julian Rhind-Tutt) rapidly explain to Trevor how to look after their opulent house, every object portends disaster – the taps are “gesture-operated”, the dog has a severe nut allergy that will cause “doggie doo-doo everywhere”, and every decoration in the house is apparently a Kandinsky or a historical artefact worth millions for one reason or another.
A lot of entertainment value is drawn out of amused suspense from all of this obvious foreshadowing. The series opens with Trevor in court being found guilty for numerous crimes, so we are anticipating the carnage from the start.
The set-ups are explicit – like the close-up shot of the dog’s ball propping open the door to the room where the dog is not allowed to go – ...
30
JUN
6am

‘12 Labours’ – a transgressive tour de force

Many of Gavin Krastin’s labours, documented in this exhibition which is the fruit of his Standard Bank Young Artist of the Year, are futile.
In rainbow stockings and severe glittering stilettos, a thick notebook clutched under his arm, Gavin Krastin, this year’s Standard Bank Young Artist of the Year (we’d better name the bank or next thing they’ll pull their funding for these awards too) for performance art, towers before us like an eccentric, androgynous aunty about to address a Rotary Club meeting.
Except he’s also wearing blue construction worker’s pants and jacket with the reflective strips, over which is a corset-like brace around his waist. And a blue gnome’s hat.
His fragility accentuated by the precarious height of his heels, there’s a mild concern that this man who has literally put his body on the line for art, for us, will totter back into one of the glass vases at floor level behind him, and upset the sweet potato tuber balanced inside in an attempt to get it, and scores of others at various levels on plinths in the Monument’s Sun Gallery, to sprout. A largely vain attempt, as he explains the failure of the humble root vegetables to play along and let their tendrils spread through the dour architectural angles and queer the space with fecundity; a delicate technical challenge of light and temperature and moisture that has been largely unsuccessful. Labour without fruit, but labour nevertheless.
In fact, many of Krastin’s 12 labours, documented in this exhibition which is the fruit of his SBYA award, are futile. It won’t be too long before the potholes they filled in wear away, or new potholes form, like inverted molehills. New plastic trash and rubble will be tossed on the illegal dump he and his 11 gnomes cleared. The refurbished and gold-painted bus stop, itself an anachronous structure with no buses in the city, will fade and peel, and be tagged with spraypaint or plastered with handbills advertising back-room abortions and penis enlargements. The queen proteas placed on the forgotten and abandoned settler graves in a humane act of open-eyed recognition, will blow away and rot in the tangled grass. Perhaps the plants in the rock-lined geometric beds created to beautify the overlooked traffic island at the very bottom end of High Street will survive, if the donkeys don’t trample them and the vandals don’t pull them out for who knows what kicks.
Krastin’s 12 ...
30
JUN
6am

Load shedding 101 – what to consider when buying LED emergency bulbs for your home

More than 15 years of load shedding have brought numerous energy solutions to keep the lights on during power cuts. Rechargeable LED bulbs are among the more accessible solutions, but with so many options and so much jargon, how should you go about choosing the right rechargeable bulb for your home?
Rechargeable LED bulbs, also known as emergency bulbs, are among the more relatively affordable options when it comes to keeping the lights on and easing the frustration brought on by frequent load shedding.
Some, when bought in packs of five or six, cost as little as R40 per bulb, while on the higher and brighter end, they might cost up to a few hundred rand. They work like regular bulbs when the power supply is available, during which time they also recharge while the switch is on. Once the power cuts, they stay on, using the rechargeable battery in the bulb itself. Depending on the bulb, they can last two to eight hours.
It’s important to take charging time into consideration, since some that are advertised to last longer during a power cut, will also require longer charging time. For example, one popular local brand promises up to four hours of battery-powered light, but it also takes for hours to charge fully. Hence it is important to also pay careful attention to the load shedding schedule to check that you have allocated enough time for charging.
Unlike regular incandescent bulbs, LED light uses less energy for comparable brightness. For example, an LED light that uses 13W to 15W of energy, provides about the same brightness as the standard 60W incandescent bulb.
LED lighting is also measured in lumen units, which give a much better idea of the brightness one can expect from a bulb. However, when shopping, especially online, you’re more likely to see the watt measurement in the product description, so it is important to get a sense of that in relation to the lumen units.
For example, looking at popular available options, which range from 5W to 15W, 5W will be the least bright at about 450 lumens, while 15W will be the brightest at around 800 lumens, a relatively standard measure for indoor lighting.
While manufacturers will often provide a lumen measurement for standard use, it is important to consider that many bulbs will be dimmer when switching over to emergency mode during a power cut, in order to get the longest-lasting light ...
30
JUN
5am

The iPhone turns 15: a look at the past (and future) of one of the 21st century’s most influential devices

Despite its ‘innovator’ status, Apple usually wasn’t the first one to offer groundbreaking new features. But it knew how to adopt existing features in groundbreaking ways.
It is 15 years since Apple released what’s arguably its flagship device: the iPhone. A decade and a half later, there are few products that have managed to reach a similar level of brand recognition.
Announced to an eager audience in 2007, the iPhone has revolutionised how we communicate and even how we live day to day.
The large-screen revolution
The iPhone was released in the United States in June 2007, and in a further six countries in November.
From the launch of Mac computers in the 1970s to the iPod in 2001, Apple already knew how to engage with its audience – and how to encourage extraordinary levels of hype when launching a product.
Early reviews for the iPhone were almost universally glowing, applauding Apple’s attention to detail and style. The only problem flagged was network connectivity – and this was an issue with slow speeds on phone carrier networks, rather than the device itself.
Consumers’ appreciation of the iPhone’s style was no surprise. It was indicative of an emerging trend towards smartphones with large-format screens (but which still reflected the form of a phone). The Nokia N95 was another such example that hit the market the same year.
The original iPhone offered wifi, supported 2G EDGE connectivity and had internet download speeds below 500Kbps (compared to multi Mbps speeds today).
It was also limited to 4GB or 8GB models. This might sound pitiful compared to the 1TB options available today, but it’s enough to hold hundreds of songs or videos and was revolutionary at the time.
The Apple assembly line
The iPhone 3G was rolled out across the globe in July 2008, with significantly improved data speeds and the addition of the Appple App Store. Even though it offered a mere 500 apps at launch, the app store marked a significant improvement in phone functionality.
And just as users started getting used to 3G, it was superseded by the 3GS about a year later.
This cycle of regularly pushing out new products was critical to Apple’s success. By releasing regular updates (either through whole product iterations, or more minor functionality improvements) Apple managed to secure an enthusiastic audience, eager for new releases each year.
Also, since older products would often be passed down within families, Apple’s product pipeline helped it establish a multi-generational user base. This ...
30
JUN
5am

The right to die: unpacking an ethical dilemma in South Africa

People make decisions throughout their lives about their health. But when they are terminally ill they are not allowed to decide when they want to die.
Sean Davison, the euthanasia activist and co-founder of DignitySA, recently completed a sentence of house arrest in South Africa for his role in the deaths of three people. He said he had not committed a crime or murder, but had helped these people because they were desperate to die. Anrich Burger, Justin Varian and Richard Holland were suffering unbearably with no hope of recovery and unable to end their own lives.
The late South African emeritus Archbishop Desmond Tutu, in whose honour Davison wants to fight to change the laws around assisted suicide, once wrote that he would want the option of an assisted death. Tutu argued that dying people should have the right to decide how and when they wanted to leave this life.
Legislation in Canada, and a number of US states and European countries, for example, allows assisted suicide. But there are still billions of people around the world, as in South Africa, who do not have this right.
The question of whether this is a right is a debate that has been raging for years in medical ethics and within religious groups.
This article is not about the religious or strictly legal aspects of the debate. It grapples with the ethical tension between arguments against and for active forms of euthanasia – one of the most contested ethical subjects in the world.
Arguments against active euthanasia
There are broadly three arguments against active forms of euthanasia:
only God has the authority to dispose over life and death
it is the role of medical doctors to preserve life and not to cause death
a doctor could abuse his or her position to take the lives of vulnerable patients, or patients might be killed against their wishes.
Although these arguments must be considered, I prefer to put forward the arguments in support of the active forms of euthanasia.
But let’s first look for the sake of clarity at two forms of active euthanasia.
Two kinds of active euthanasia
One is known as voluntary active euthanasia. This is when death is intentionally brought about in the life of a patient who is competent to make such a decision, and where death is reasonably believed to be in the interest of and based on an informed request by the patient. The doctor’s act is the proximate cause of ...

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