Burning Issue

THE VOICE OF THE CAPE  |  Podcast , ±57 min episodes every 1 week, 6 days  | 
The content echoes the name of the show – a platform that creates discussion around issues of religion, legal, consumer related, news and human interest stories. Hosted by seasoned photo-journalist and writer Yazeed Kamaldien who has a passion for community news, the 2 hour discussion show is interactive with the lines open for people to voice their opinions while the experts answer the questions.

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04
AUG

Land occupation in the WCape: Have we reached a tipping point?

In tonight’s show, we are dealing with the thorny issue of land occupation. Land and housing and is always a sensitive subject, which lends itself to race and politics.

Recently, our news has been dominated by reports of lady land occupation attempts in Cape Town, which have descended into violence and chaos.

The City of Cape Town says it has dealt with 260 incidents of alleged illegal land occupation between April and July's lockdown. The Western Cape government says these are "highly coordinated and sophisticated" incidents.

Attempts to illegally occupy land, City projects or community facilities include several orchestrated attempts in Kraafontein, Mfuleni, Khayelitsha, Delft, Dunoon, Firgrove (Macassar), Milnerton and Nyanga among others.

In various incidents this past week, shacks were erected on open pieces of land, but law enforcement authorities dismantled these dwellings – which resulted in clashes.

What is at the root of these land invasions? How should the government respond? And what does the law say about the invasion of land?

Those are the questions we ask in tonight’s show

Joining me on air:
-Linda Phito, an activist from Kraaifontein and Pastor Charles George from the Delft CPF
-Sherylle Dass from the Legal Resources Centre and Zama Mgwatyu from the Development Action Group
-After 8: We chat to Mayco member for Human Settlements, councillor Malusi Booi
and MEC for Human Settlements Tertius Simmers
-And as we wrap up, Anele Khumalo from Werkmans Attorneys
01
JUL

Schools on the front line against COVID-19 - part 1

Following our discussion on the re-opening of schools about a month ago, we pick up this conversation again this evening amid the growing calls for schools to be shut down. There is a serious concern that since learning resumed on June 8th, there are 1169 staff members and 523 pupils contracted the coronavirus nationally. More than 700 schools across the country had to be temporarily closed for Covid-19 decontamination since the phased reopening started. The Western Cape is leading, with 332 schools closed, and 134 pupils and 557 staff members infected. Various schools have planned pickets for this week to voice their objections.

As we see more grades returning to school on the 6th July, is it simply okay for the department of education to urge school principals to ensure their schools comply with all health protocols, without understanding the reality on the ground? What impact is this pandemic having on teachers and learners?

In tonight’s show, we look at schools on the front line against COVID-19.
01
JUL

Schools on the front line against COVID-19 - part 2

Following our discussion on the re-opening of schools about a month ago, we pick up this conversation again this evening amid the growing calls for schools to be shut down. There is a serious concern that since learning resumed on June 8th, there are 1169 staff members and 523 pupils contracted the coronavirus nationally. More than 700 schools across the country had to be temporarily closed for Covid-19 decontamination since the phased reopening started. The Western Cape is leading, with 332 schools closed, and 134 pupils and 557 staff members infected. Various schools have planned pickets for this week to voice their objections.

As we see more grades returning to school on the 6th July, is it simply okay for the department of education to urge school principals to ensure their schools comply with all health protocols, without understanding the reality on the ground? What impact is this pandemic having on teachers and learners?

In tonight’s show, we look at schools on the front line against COVID-19.
23
JUN

100 days of COVID19: Challenges of Muslim

Friday marked 100 days since South Africans were informed of the first Covid-19 patient and the country has seen a steady increase in cases and deaths. At first, the bulk of the country's cases were "imported" cases from foreigners entering the country and citizens returning from overseas trips. And then it was towards the end of March that the country began seeing cases of community transmission. Last night, South Africa breached the 100 000 mark with 101 590 COVID19 cases and 1 991 deaths. Experts say we are closely heading to the peak of the virus and we see this every day, by the amount of janazahs we read out on air.

In tonight’s, we look at the changing landscape of Muslim burial over the past 100 days. What are the challenges, what are the patterns and why?

In the first part of the show:
-We chat to Mr Ebrahim Solomons of Haathiem Al Lathaat Burial Services. He’s also the chairperson of the Western Cape Undertakers Forum
-Independent undertaker Yagha Canfield joins us a bit later
-After 8: We go up north to look at burial challenges with the Johannesburg based Saaberie Chisty Society (pronounced Sabri Chees-tee)
-And we chat to Muhammad Wadee of Muslim Stats SA on some interesting trends they are analyzing with the regards to covid19 in the Muslim community
16
JUN

No Hajj for SA: What happens next:

It was heartbreaking for our local hujjaj as they dealt with the news that the hajj is off the cards for this year...it’s something many knew would be an option, but to hear the official decision was still very tough for many pilgrims.

Due to lockdown restrictions, such as the closure of borders, South African Muslims who were planning on embarking on hajj, will no longer be able to do so. This was the decision taken by Sahuc, following a meeting last week. As we know, Saudi Arabia has not made an official decision on hajj known yet.

This of course is unprecedented. Now that hajj is no longer possible for South Africa…what happens next? On Burning Issue tonight, we bring in the South African Hajj Travel Operators Association to unpack this further
09
JUN

Is it time for the Muslim community to confront anti-black racism?

The past week has been an emotional trigger for many South Africans as we witnessed mass protests in the wake of the murder of an unarmed black man George Floyd, pinned on the ground by a white police officer in Minneapolis who forced his knee on his neck for more than eight minutes before he suffocated to death. The phrase "I can't breathe" – which was George Floyd’s last few words – has become the slogan of these mass protests.

George Floyd’s death is just another senseless murder of black citizens, who are victims of systemic racism and police brutality. For this reason, the Black Lives Matter movement galvanized together for solidarity protests around the world – even in South Africa- highlighting the global fight against anti-black racism, discrimination and oppression.

But if we look closer to home, we had a similar case right here on our doorstep. Collins Khosa, a 40-year-old resident of Alexandra township, was killed by the SANDF at the start of the lockdown.

Why was there was no real outrage? Do black lives not matter in South Africa? And what is the role of the Muslim community in all of this? Is it time we confront anti-black racism from within the Muslim community?

These are some of the questions we're asking in Burning Issue tonight.

In tonight’s show:

-We chat to two activists on the concept of Black Lives Matter and the issue of racism from within the Muslim community
-We unpack the Islamic perspective with two local scholars – and hear how the Prophet SAW navigated issues of race and oppression
-And later on, we connect with a Black Muslim American lawyer, who will speak about Black Lives Matter and racism in the American context
03
JUN

Reopening places of worship under level 3 of the lockdown

In Burning Issue this week, we look at the discussion amongst ulema for more defined regulations for masajid to reopen under lockdown level 3; the medical challenges of opening up congregational prayers; the potential risks placed on all places of worship, and whether religious freedoms should supersede the importance of public health?
In this part of the show, we chat to Jaamia Galant from Claremont Main Road Mosque and Reverend Prof Peter Storey. Later we chat to Michael Swain, director of Freedom of Religion SA.
03
JUN

Places of worship reopening under level 3

In Burning Issue this week, we look at the discussion amongst ulema for more defined regulations for masajid to reopen under lockdown level 3; the medical challenges of opening up congregational prayers; the potential risks placed on all places of worship, and whether religious freedoms should supersede the importance of public health?
26
MAY

Should the opening of schools be put on hold?

As more businesses start to open up under Level 3 of the national lockdown, South Africa also faces the huge challenge of schools reopening this week - under what is unusual and difficult circumstances. The reopening of schools in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic is the biggest issue on everyone’s lips at the moment (besides cigarettes!) and we know there are many anxious parents out there, who are not ready to send their children to school as yet.

As we know, the phased reopening of schools is set to start with the return of Grade 7 and 12 learners on Monday 1st of June, while school management teams (SMTs) returned yesterday. Already, several trade unions are up in arms over the Department of Basic Education’s decision – with the Educators Union of South Africa (Eusa) taking the government to court. Eusa says Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga and her department misled the public about supplying personal protective equipment and guaranteeing the safety of pupils and teachers.

Former DA Leader Mmusi Maimane joined thousands of parents who are against their kids returning to school by launching a petition and within hours, thousands of parents showed their support. He has now called on President Cyril Ramaphosa to react after the petition gathered over 150 000 signatures.

In the news today, we saw that two Cape Town schools are temporarily shut after returning teachers tested positive for COVID19.
21
APR

Why South Africa is facing a food crisis?

The national lock-down has made the lack of food security among poorer communities worse and the government will this week provide details of further action to provide food to vulnerable and destitute people who cannot afford to buy food.

Over the past three weeks there have been distressing images of people clamouring for food parcels at distribution centres and of community protests against food shortages. Recently, we saw the looting of stores and trucks, which reflects how severe the food shortage has become.

Many non-governmental organisations did, very early in the lock-down, warn about the impact of the lock-down on already fragile food security amongst vulnerable communities.

Interestingly, In his weekly letter to the nation yesterday, President Ramaphosa offered a frank assessment of the current situation nearly a month into the lock-down.

He said government chose to “err on the side of caution” when implementing state of disaster measures that critics have said have inflicted more damage than necessary to the economy. His letter strongly hinted at the possibility that many people will be allowed to return to various jobs at the end of April when the extension of the lock-down ends.

The president admitted that the inequalities and hunger being highlighted by the covid19 outbreak are not just because of the apartheid past but because of a “fundamental failing in our post-apartheid society”.

He promised that he would shortly provide more clarity on the direct measures that will be taken to ensure that the most vulnerable South Africans don’t have to worry about where their next meal may be coming from.

So this is exactly what we want to unpack this evening. We are asking the question “why South Africa is facing a food crisis?”
31
MAR

Can the lockdown be effective on the Cape Flats?

Assalamu alaikum and welcome to Burning Issue. My name is Mogammad Faseigh Petersen. This past week has been a watershed moment for South Africa, which has turned our entire lives on its head. South Africa commenced a 21 day lockdown period on Friday which ends on April 16th – in a bid to curtail the spread of the coronavirus. Currently there are 3 deaths in South Africa and 1326 infections. (check to see if updated by 7pm)

But while the majority of South Africans have heeded the call to stay at home, there are certain communities, or perhaps pockets of people in certain areas, who are not adhering to the national regulations. The president even mentioned this in his speech last night, saying “we are concerned about those who have not yet appreciated the seriousness of this disease.”

In Cape Town, authorities have found it difficult managing the lockdown on the cape flats and township areas. Why is the lockdown not being adhered to in our townships? And how should authorities respond?

Well that’s our Burning Issue this evening. We hope to take some calls on 021 442 3530 and your messages via SMS: 47913 or WhatsApp: 072 238 0712

Our guests tonight:
-Byron De Villliers, Lentegeur CPF chairperson and
-Graham Lindhorst, chairperson of the Bishop Lavis CPF
-Abdul Kariem Matthews, Bishop Lavis Action Community (BLAC)
-Axolile Notywala, from the Social Justice Coalition
-Later on in the show, we have SAPS
-As well as the City of Cape Town’s safety and security directorate
-We also hope to get Cameron Dugmore from the ANC on the line
24
MAR

Janazah conditions in the time of COVID-19

So as we know, South Africans have been confronted with a new reality of a complete national shutdown from midnight on Friday morning to curb the spread of the coronavirus. The figures for COVID19 continues to rise, with todays stats showing there are 554 positive cases in South Africa – something which we should all be concerned about.

One of the most frequently asked questions this past week following government’s announcement of the Disaster Management regulations is how Muslim janazahs will be carried out. At first, we were told funerals must have less than 100 people, in accordance with the president’s advisory on social distancing. But of course, that rule will change under the lockdown conditions.

Besides the actual numbers, there is also the matter of dealing with the mayet.

Can a person who has died of COVID-19 infect others? The answer to this is a resounding yes, according to the experts. So this is why tonight’s topic is vitally important.

Thus far, very little clarity has been given by authorities on this very matter, and that is something we hope to uncover in Burning Issue this evening.

We hope to take some calls on 021 442 3530 and your messages via SMS: 47913 or WhatsApp: 072 238 0712

Joining me in-studio, is Mr Ebrahim Solomon, chairperson of the Western Cape Muslim Undertakers Forum. Due to our social distancing policy instudio, we only have one guest

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