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10
JAN

Northern Ireland to restart devolved government

A power-sharing coalition, led by the Democratic Unionist Party and Sinn Féin, collapsed in January 2017 over a green energy row. But earlier Sinn Féin President Mary Lou McDonald told a Stormont press conference that her party will support a return to 'genuine power sharing'. Deidre Heenan is Professor of Social Policy from the University of Ulster tell us why public services and the economy had been so severely effected by the three year stalemate. Chris Low of FTN Financial in New York brings us the latest from financial markets and we find out about the business of the barber shop - are some breaking the law by turning away women as customers? A question for equality lawyer, Elizabeth McGlone, Partner at Bindmans LLP.
10
JAN

The potential for tech entrepreneurship in Africa

The tech sector in Africa is seen by many as having great potential, and we find out why. Damilola Anwo-Ade runs web and mobile app development business Sprout Digital in Nigeria's capital Abuja, and says the energy, spirit and passion to be found in Africa is unmatched anywhere in the world. Markos Lemma of Ethiopian tech business consultancy Iceaddis discusses his recent meeting with Twitter's co-founder Jack Dorsey, who has announced he'll spend six months living in Africa during 2020. And Hillary Miller-Wise, chief executive of a Kenyan digital marketplace for small-scale African farmers called Tulaa explains how the service works. Also in the programme, the BBC's Theo Leggett discusses a batch of internal messages between Boeing staff that shed new light on problems at the plane maker in the run-up to two of its 737 Max planes crashing. Plus we meet two people who have been logging their expenditure for a new project on our Facebook page BBC My Money World.

(Picture: A woman uses a virtual reality headset in Kigali. Picture credit: Getty Images.)
09
JAN

Update: Trudeau believes missile downed jet in Iran

Evidence from multiple Western sources suggests that the Ukrainian passenger jet which crashed near Tehran on Wednesday was shot down by an Iranian missile. The Canadian prime minister, Justin Trudeau, said the incident may well have been unintentional. The crash came just hours after Iran 'concluded' it's military strikes on airbases housing US forces in Iraq. Cary Leahey of Decision Economics in New York tells us that the apparent de-escalation of tensions since then has led to a relief rally for stock markets. And British retailers say spending was weak during the holiday period - does this show a shift in our spending habits? We ask Ben Hayman, Managing Partner at the consultancy Given London.
08
JAN

Update: Markets fluctuate following Iran airstrikes

Oil prices and global stock markets have fluctuated following Iran's airstrike on US military targets in Iraq late on Tuesday. We hear from the BBC's Sameer Hashmi in Dubai, Professor Rockford Weitz at the Fletcher School of Law and diplomacy in Massachusetts and Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago. Also in this edition, the World Bank has warned on global growth for 2020, shaving 0.2 percentage points from it's predictions. The BBC's Andrew Walker has spoken to one of the report's main authors, Franziska Ohnsorge.
08
JAN

Update: Markets fluctuate following Iran airstrikes

Oil prices and global stock markets have fluctuated following Iran's airstrike on US military targets in Iraq late on Tuesday. We hear from the BBC's Sameer Hashmi in Dubai, Professor Rockford Weitz at the Fletcher School of Law and diplomacy in Massachusetts and Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago. Also in this edition, the World Bank has warned on global growth for 2020, shaving 0.2 percentage points from it's predictions. The BBC's Andrew Walker has spoken to one of the report's main authors, Franziska Ohnsorge.
08
JAN

Can planting trees tackle climate change?

We examine the extent to which planting trees could help to mitigate climate change. Professor Tom Crowther of ETH Zurich University tells us how many trees could have a meaningful impact on global carbon dioxide levels. Darren Woodcroft of the Woodland Trust explains his organisation's plans for planting trees in the UK. We hear from Malian singer Inna Modja, about her documentary The Great Green Wall which reflects the ambition to reforest an 8,000km belt across the degraded landscapes of the Sahel. And we ask Dr Susan Cook, forest restoration scientist at The Nature Conservancy in the United States, whether her organisation's aim to plant a billion trees is feasible. Also in the programme, we gauge market reaction to Iran's bombing of two bases used by US troops in Iraq, and ask David Braithwaite, professor of safety and accident investigations at Cranfield University in the UK, what might have caused a Ukraine International Airlines flight from Tehran to Kyiv to crash. Plus as Nissan chief executive turned international fugitive Carlos Ghosn gives his first press conference in Beirut, Lebanon, the BBC's business editor Simon Jack brings us the details.
05
JAN

Iran-US tensions ripples across world

Iran vows revenge for a US strike on its top military general – we check in on what the reaction in the US has been with the BBC’s Jane O Brien in Washington, and an expert based in Riyadh to assess the wider impact across the Middle East. In the US, tech show CES kicks off again… and a cat that growls if you over-pet its ears is a favourite with attendees. And in LA, dormitory-style rooms with minimum privacy are a stepping stone away from homelessness - but do little to remedy the housing crisis, as we hear from Regan Morris in LA.
02
JAN

Morocco's phosphates industry

Phosphates account for 20% of Morocco's exports, but not without controversy. The BBC's Matthew Davies reports on an industry that is a geopolitical hot potato. Nada Elmajdoub of mining company OCP tells us how long the country's phosphate reserves might last. Stephen Zunes is a professor of politics and international studies at the University of San Francisco, and discusses the complex history of the Western Sahara region where Morocco's phosphates are found. And Mohamed Kamal Fadel, Polisario Front Representative to Australia explains the legal strategy his organisation has used to ensure the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic can lay claim to the phosphates it sees as its resources.
Also in the programme, after Nissan's former chief executive Carlos Ghosn fled Japan to Lebanon, Michael Woodford, the whistleblower who exposed a billion dollar fraud scandal at Olympus tells us Mr Ghosn wouldn't have received a fair trial if he had stayed.
Plus the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on whether a fun working environment is the secret to keeping employees happy.
02
JAN

Rights of nature

In July 2019 Bangladesh took the unusual step of granting all its rivers “legal personhood”. It was the result of a long fight by environmental campaigners, alarmed by the damage done to the country’s vital river system by pollution and the effects of climate change. But does passing a law recognising that nature has rights, just as humans do, automatically guarantee its protection? According to its supporters, the movement for the Rights of Nature is an expanding area of law, but are those laws anything more than just symbolic? We talk to Dr Mohammad Abdul Matin by the banks of the Buriganga River in Dhaka about the future for the country’s rivers and in New Zealand to Chris Finlayson, who was attorney general in the centre right government that in 2017 passed a law recognising the Whanganui River as a living entity. And Cardiff University law professor, Anna Grear, tells us why giving natural phenomena the same legal status as humans is no safeguard against exploitation. There are other options on the table - Jojo Mehta from the Stop Ecocide campaign explains why she thinks it’s criminal law that provides the most reliable way of preventing damage to nature. And Tamasin goes to Sheffield in the North of England to meet members of STAG, the Sheffield Tree Action Groups, who campaigned to stop their council’s tree-felling programme.

Photo: A fisherman throwing his net into the River Buriganga in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Copyright Salman Saeed/BBC

38 episodes

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