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15
JUN
11am

Trump Puts 25% Tariff on Chinese Goods

President Trump is to impose 25% tariffs on $50bn worth of Chinese goods. Dr Rebecca Harding runs Coriolis Technologies, which provides data to the trade finance sector, and assesses the likely impact of the move. Also in the programme, a new law imposing a registration fee of $900 on bloggers in Tanzania is putting off a lot of writers in the country. Elsie Eyakuze has just suspended her blog called The Mickocheni Report, and tells us why, whilst Ben Taylor, who runs a blog on Tanzania from Britain, explains his offer to host Tanzanian bloggers from his own site if they are having problems. We travel to Chile where local drought-affected communities have come up with the idea of a 'fog catcher' to give them much needed water. Plus we look back at the rest of the week's big business stories with Benedikt Kammel at Bloomberg, and Slavea Chankova of The Economist.
14
JUN
6pm

Trump Charity Sued by New York

New York's attorney general is suing the Trump Foundation, as well as Donald Trump and his children, alleging "extensive and persistent" lawbreaking.Barbara Underwood said the charitable foundation had engaged in "unlawful political co-ordination" designed to influence the 2016 election. We speak to Darren Samuelsohn Senior, reporter at Politico.And we get the latest markets insights from Cary Leahey at Decision Economics.
14
JUN
11am

Russia World Cup Gets Under Way

As the football World Cup kicks off in Moscow, we look at the financial implications. Olga Tanas is economics reporter in Moscow for Bloomberg, and we have a report from Kolkata, India, on how popular the championship is likely to be there. Also in the programme, as the European Central Bank announces it will wind down its economic stimulus by the end of the year, Russ Mould of investment company A J Bell discusses the market reaction. Following a succession of votes on Brexit in the British parliament, we look at next steps in the process with pro-Brexit Lord Digby Jones, and anti-Brexit Sebastian Dullien of the Europe Council on Foreign Relations. We meet Michelin-starred chef Jose Andrews, who has just won an award for his work to assemble kitchens to feed people in need following natural disasters. Plus we travel to Nairobi, Kenya, to hear about an initiative aimed at helping artists bring their work to market.
13
JUN
6pm

Update: US Interest Rate Rise

The US Federal Reserve raised the target federal funds rate by 0.25%, taking it to 1.75% to 2%. Officials aim to head off excessive inflation with higher rates and think the US economy can handle higher borrowing costs. We hear from Susan Schmidt, senior portfolio manager at the Westwood Holdings Group in Dallas and economist Irwin Stelzer of the Hudson Institute. What's in a name? A lot if you are Macedonian. The country has resolved a 27 year dispute with Greece by agreeing on a major rebrand - it'll be known as the Republic of Northern Macedonia. Journalist Borjan Jovanovski tells us what the locals think. Plus, it's been announced that the 2026 soccer World Cup will be held in the United States, Canada and Mexico. We hear from Brian Sciaretta at American Soccer Now.
13
JUN
11am

Federal Reserve to Decide US Interest Rates

With US interest rates expected to rise, we look at the impact on the global economy. Our regular economic commentator, Irwin Stelzer of the Hudson Institute, gives us his take. Also in the programme, the Japanese car giant Toyota is investing $1bn in the Singapore-based ride sharing firm Grab. Vivek Vaidya is vice-president of technology at management consultants Frost and Sullivan, and tells us more about the deal. Following a dispute with Greece, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia has agreed to change its name to the Republic of Northern Macedonia. Journalist Borjan Jovanovski explains why some are not happy about the deal. We travel to the Indian state of Kashmir to meet the people foraging for lucrative morel mushrooms. Plus fashion designer Stella McCartney explains why she's going green with her new fashion emporium.
12
JUN
6pm

Judge Clears AT&T Takeover Of Time Warner

In one of the largest antitrust cases in decades, a judge in the United States has given telecommunications giant AT&T the all clear to buy Time Warner, a major entertainment company. The case could influence the US media scene for years to come. We're joined from New York by the BBC's Paul Blake.President Trump believes economic prospects for North Korea could be bright, but that view is controversial. Following a historic summit in Singapore between North Korea and the US, we get the reaction of North Korean defector Ensun Kim, and ask Robert Manning of the Atlantic Council in Washington DC what work actually needs to be done to put a deal in place.We'll also hear how the markets reacted to the summit, with Mark Kepner of Themis Trading in New Jersey.Also in the show, the BBC's Dave Lee gives us the view from E3, the world's biggest gaming convention, and Dr Ruth Valerio of the development charity Tearfund explains how much of a challenge plastic waste presents for Africa.
12
JUN
11am

Trump Claims Progress After Kim Summit

President Trump believes economic prospects for North Korea could be bright. Following a historic summit in Singapore between North Korea and the US, we get the reaction of North Korean defector Ensun Kim, and ask Marianne Schneider-Petsinger from the research group Chatham House how much hope the agreement the leaders signed actually offers. Also in the programme, ahead of this week's opening games of the football World Cup, we hear from Rob Wilson, football finance expert from Sheffield Hallam University, about an influx of investment in the game from Chinese companies. Dr Ruth Valerio of the development charity Tearfund explains how much of a challenge plastic waste presents for Africa. Plus after Starbucks closed thousands of coffee shops across the US and Canada for diversity training, we have a report from Washington examining how corporate America is responding to charges of racism.
11
JUN
11am

Spain 'Will Accept' Disputed Migrant Ship

Spain says it will accept a migrant rescue ship that Italy had rejected. Cesare Pitea is professor of international law at Parma University, and tells us whether Italy was legally able to refuse the migrants permission to land. Also in the programme, as Singapore prepares for Tuesday's historic summit between US President Donald Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un, we hear about the likely economic impact of the meeting. Egypt has been raising concerns over an Ethiopian dam on the River Nile. Ahmed Soliman is a research associate with the Africa Programme at the Chatham House think tank, and explains why tensions appear to have eased. A summit is being held in France to help the next generation of women in the animation industry to break through. Michelle Nardone is head of animation at University College in Copenhagen, and tells us about the challenges women in the industry face. Plus our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare discusses whether being fit can help you get ahead at work.
10
JUN
8pm

President Trump Arrives In Singapore For North Korea Summit

On the heels of a stormy G7 meeting in Canada, US President Donald Trump has arrived in Singapore for a historic summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un. BBC correspondent Chris Buckler joins us from Washington to compare the importance of the two summits.The new management of troubled airline Air France-KLM will present measures to respond to a staff "malaise" this week. The Economist’s bureau chief in Paris, Sophie Pedder, gives her take on whether these measures can repair relations between the national carrier and French labour unions.Then, economist Michael Hughes looks to the week ahead, as a series of central bank announcements give clues to the future health of the major developed economies.And finally, an increasing number of cryptocurrency mining operations are moving to Iceland. The BBC’s Edwin Lane travels to the small island nation to find out why.
08
JUN
11am

G7 Meets Amid Trade Rows

The G7 meeting in Quebec looks set to be the most tense in the organisation's history. The BBC's Gary O'Donoghue explains the main points of disagreement. Also in the programme, we travel to Warren, Ohio, to find out how much support there is in the US for President Trump's tariffs on steel imports. We have a report from Australia on a week of scandals in the country's banking sector. It's food safety week in the UK, and we find out what that means from Ruth Willis of the Food Standards Agency. Plus we look back at the rest of the week's big business headlines with Jessica Dye of the Financial Times in New York, and Riva Gold of the Wall Street Journal in London.

38 episodes

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