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06
DEC
11am

Huawei Executive Arrest May Worsen US-China Relations

The arrest of a Chinese company executive could worsen relations between the US and China. Emily Taylor is an associate fellow at the Chatham House think tank, and considers the likely impact of the arrest in Canada of Huawei's chief financial officer, Meng Wangzhou. Also in the programme, with the outcome of next week's vote on the UK government's Brexit deal still uncertain, we find out from Craig Beaumont of the Federation of Small Businesses what preparations companies are making for the various potential Brexit scenarios. The word voluntourist describes a foreigner who goes to a poorer country to do well-meaning voluntary work, but our reporter asks whether voluntourists may be doing more harm than good. The Mission Impossible actor Tom Cruise is urging TV users to switch off a feature called motion smoothing to improve the viewing quality of blockbuster movies. Caroline Frost is TV chair at the Broadcasting Press Guild and tells us whether Mr Cruise has a point. Plus Indian singer and songwriter Babbu Maan discusses the entertainment business in India.
05
DEC
6pm

World's Biggest Oil Producers Discuss Output Cuts

A meeting of the world’s biggest oil exporters will discuss cutting output to help shore up prices. Saudi Arabia and the rest of the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries, Opec, are meeting in Vienna over the next few days along with Russia. Amrita Sen at Energy Aspects is in Vienna for the meeting. Also in the programme, CO2 emissions are expected to reach a record high this year. The BBC's Matt McGrath reports from the United Nations' annual climate change conference in Poland.
05
DEC
11am

Takeda Shareholders Back $59bn Shire Takeover

A big takeover deal in the global drugs industry has moved a significant step closer. As shareholders in the Japanese firm Takeda give the green light to its $59bn purchase of Irish rival Shire, public health policy expert professor David Taylor, of University College, London, tells us what it will mean for patients. Also in the programme, we have a report from the Spanish port city of Barcelona about efforts to bring illegal immigrants out of the shadows. With global equity markets confused about the significance of last weekend's reported trade truce between the US and China, our regular economic commentator, US business journalist Diane Brady, tells us whether she thinks peace has really broken out. As the British parliament engages in days of debate about the government's proposed Brexit deal, we find out how food manufacturers in Devon in the south west of England have been dealing with uncertainty over what form Brexit will take. Plus London based chef Shrimoyee Chakraborty tells us the extraordinary story of the centenarian Indian grandmother Mastanamma who became an unlikely star on YouTube for her cooking.
04
DEC
6pm

Update: British PM Suffers Brexit Defeat Ahead of Key Vote

British Prime Minister Theresa May has suffered two major defeats - just before opening five days of debate on the government's deal for the UK's withdrawal from the European Union. With widespread expectation that the deal will not pass a vote in the House of Commons, the BBC's Rob Watson explains the possible consequences. Also in the programme, Joe Saluzzi at Themis trading explains why shares have plunged on Wall Street.
04
DEC
3pm

British PM Suffers Brexit Defeats Ahead of Key Vote

British Prime Minister Theresa May has suffered three significant defeats - just before opening five days of debate on the government's deal for the UK's withdrawal from the European Union. With widespread expectation that the deal will not pass a vote in the House of Commons, we discuss the possible economic consequences of a 'no deal' Brexit with the British economist Roger Bootle of Capital Economics, and Jonathan Portes, professor of economics and public policy at King's College London. Also in the programme, the French government has backed down over new taxes on fuel, following violent protests. We look at the economic and political implications with Harriet Agnew, Paris correspondent for the Financial Times. Plus we take you to Punjab in northern India, where pesticides used by farmers have been blamed for the state's high rates of cancer.
03
DEC
6pm

Update: British Spy Chief Questions China's Role in UK Tech

The boss of MI6 has raised concerns about Chinese involvement in the UK's infrastructure. Alan Woodward at the University of Surrey analyses the potential threats. Also in the programme, United Nations-sponsored climate talks are getting under way in Katowice, Poland, from where our environment correspondent Matt McGrath brings us the details. To reduce traffic congestion, a ban on minibus taxis has been introduced in the central business district of Kenya's capital, Nairobi. We hear why operators and passengers think the new policy is unfair. We take a trip over the bridge between Denmark's Copenhagen and Sweden's Malmo, to hear how it has fostered economic co-operation, as the crossing turns 18. Plus our regular workplace commentator, Pilita Clarke, asks whether it is fair to charge people with bigger feet more for their shoes.
02
DEC
8pm

US and China Reach Temporary Trade Truce

US President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping have agreed to halt new trade tariffs for 90 days to allow for further talks. At a post-G20 summit meeting in Buenos Aires, Mr Trump agreed not to boost tariffs on $200bn of Chinese goods from 10% to 25% on 1 January. Yu Jie is China Research Fellow at the London-based think-tank Chatham House. She tells us about the political ramifications of this ‘trade truce’ for China and President Xi.
Israeli police have recommended indicting Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his wife Sara for alleged fraud and bribery. They are suspected of awarding regulatory favours to the Bezeq telecom firm in return for positive media coverage of the couple. Mr Netanyahu has vehemently denied the allegations, calling them a “match-fix”. Aaron David Miller, Vice-president and director of the Middle East program at the Woodrow Wilson Centre in Washington, gives his take on the politics of the accusation.

Last month Tanzania's President John Magufuli said he prefers Chinese to Western aid as it comes with fewer conditions. This comes at the same time many foreign investors are getting nervous about Tanzania’s economic policies and the President’s confrontational stance on social and political issues. Judith Tyson, Research Fellow at the Overseas Development Institute, joins the show to discuss how Chinese loans may be shifting alliances in the country.

And finally, a lot of thought has been put into how Brexit will affect various British workers in Europe, but one group that hasn’t cropped up much is the small army of interpreters working in the heart of Brussels, the European Parliament. The BBC’s Manuela Saragosa travelled to Brussels to hear how the British interpreters are dealing with their country’s imminent departure.

Plus, we’ll get a regular view on the week’s economic news with independent economist Michael Hughes.

(Photo description: US President Donald Trump, US Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin, US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer along with members of their delegation hold a dinner meeting with China's President Xi Jinping (out of frame) at the end of the G20 Leaders' Summit in Buenos Aires, on December 01, 2018. Photo credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
30
NOV
11am

Hotel Data Hack Hits 500 Million Guests

Marriott hotels say a cyber attacker has accessed data for up to 500 million customers. The online security expert Graham Cluley tells us what's known about the data breach. Also in the programme, with leaders of the G20 group of countries gathered in Buenos Aires, Argentina, trade is at the top of the agenda. Our correspondent discusses the deal that has been signed between the US, Canada and Mexico, and tells us whether any progress is likely on the dispute between the US and China. We're in Brussels, looking at how Brexit is expected to shape the future of the European Union. We also have a report from Andalucia in southern Spain, examining how this weekend's elections are likely to affect the region's economy. Plus we look back at the rest of the week's big business stories, with Charlie Wells of The Economist in London, and Melodie Hahm of Yahoo Finance in New York.
29
NOV
6pm

Bayer to Cut 12,000 Jobs

The pharmaceutical giant insists the cuts are not prompted by its acquisition of Monsanto nor by a costly California court case over the Roundup weedkiller. Professor Erik Gordon at the University of Michigan says it's a challenging market for big pharmaceuticals in the US. Plus, Cary Leahey from Decision Economics in New York explains how Wall Street reacted to the deliberations of the US Federal Reserve over future interest rates.
29
NOV
11am

Katarpur Corridor May Improve India-Pakistan Relations

There's optimism a crossing between India and Pakistan for Sikhs could improve relations. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis is in the northern Indian state of Punjab, and explains the background. Also in the programme, there's anger in South Africa at a new wave of power cuts across the country, amid financial difficulties at power generator Eskom. Pretoria-based financial journalist Antoinette Slabbert tells us what gave rise to the company's problems. Plus we're in the Polish city of Poznan, to hear what people there think about their country's membership of the European Union.
28
NOV
6pm

No-deal Brexit Could Sink UK into Recession

The Bank of England warns sterling could plummet 25% and the UK economy could shrink 8% in a no-deal scenario. Shankar Singham of the Institute of Economic Affairs reacts to Mark Carney's dire predictions. Also, US stocks have rebounded - with the Dow Jones enjoying its biggest rally for eight months. We get analysis from Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago.

39 episodes

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