Subscribe to this channel

You can subscribe to new audio episodes published on this channel. You can follow updates using the channel's RSS feed, or via other audio platforms you may already be using.

RSS Feed

You can use any RSS feed reader to follow updates, even your browser. We recommend using an application dedicated to listening podcasts for the best experience. iOS users can look at Overcast or Castro. Pocket Casts is also very popular and has both iOS and Android versions. Add the above link to the application to follow this podcast channel.

Signup to iono.fm

Sign up for a free iono.fm user account to start building your playlist of podcast channels. You'll be able to build a personalised RSS feed you can follow or listen with our web player.
11
SEP
5pm

Mining giant boss quits after historic cave destruction

Rio Tinto's boss is quitting after the destruction of Aboriginal sites in Australia. Patrick O'Leary is from the organisation Country Needs People, and tells us about the cultural importance of the sites destroyed by the mining giant. And we get further perspective on Jean-Sébastien Jacques' decision to step down from Aidan Davy, chief operating officer at the International Council for Mining and Metals. Also in the programme, the UK has finalised a trade deal with Japan, and we examine the significance of the moment. In the Asian community, weddings often last for several days and are well known for the sheer number of invitees, their opulence and the cost. But with coronavirus putting a stop to large gatherings, the BBC's Nisha Patel has been finding out what it means for the future of Asian weddings. Plus, the Dutch airline KLM is funding trials of a V-shaped aircraft that they claim could cut fuel use, and therefore emissions. We find out whether it is a feasible alternative to the more familiar plane shape that we are all used to.
11
SEP
12am

Update: EU ultimatum to UK over withdrawal deal changes

The EU is demanding the UK ditches plans to change Boris Johnson's Brexit deal "by the end of the month" or risk jeopardising trade talks. The UK has published a bill to rewrite parts of the withdrawal agreement it signed in January. Jess Sargent of the UK Institute for Government explains the legalities of this move. Meanwhile the EU said this had "seriously damaged trust" and it would not be "shy" of taking legal action against the UK. Fintan O'Toole of the Irish Times explains what that means for the UK's closest European neighbour. Also in the programme, the lead in a new socially-distanced production of Cats in Seoul talks about what it's like getting back on the stage. And we'll hear about the day's trading on Wall Street with Cary Leahy of Decision Economics. Plus, 80s Hair Metal singer Jon Bon Jovi pitches in at a food bank during an unprecedented unemployment crisis.
10
SEP
5pm

Reducing the risk of work-related suicide

On World Suicide Prevention Day we ask how employers can prevent work-related suicide. Yvette Greenway-Mansfield's partner's daughter and a colleague both took their own lives. She helped found the support organisation Silence of Suicide in response, and tells us what more she thinks can be done. And Louise Aston, wellbeing campaign director at Business in the Community, discusses a suicide prevention toolkit they have put together for employers who, she says, have a responsibility to spot warning signs. Also in the programme, the insurance market Lloyd's of London has recorded a loss after $3bn of coronavirus-related claims. Bruce Carnegie-Brown is chairman of Lloyd's, and explains what the long-term impact of the pandemic on insurance is likely to be. Plus, as make-up firm L'Oreal launches a recycling service in the UK for its products across a thousand stores, we get reaction from Will McCallum, head of oceans at Greenpeace UK.
09
SEP
11pm

Update: LVMH scraps Tiffany takeover

French luxury goods giant LVMH has said it is pulling out of a high-profile deal to buy US jeweller Tiffany & Co. Governor Andrew Cuomo has announced New York City restaurants can reopen indoor dining at 25 percent capacity on September 30th. And we'll hear from the day's trading on the US markets with Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago.
09
SEP
5pm

UK's Prime Minister defends Brexit deal changes

The UK government has published a bill overwriting parts of the EU withdrawal agreement. Victoria Hewson analyses regulations at the Institute of Economic Affairs, and explains why the proposed UK law, which the government acknowledges could breach international law, is so controversial. We get the perspective of two British businesses about the possibility of there being no new trade deal in place before the end of the UK's transitional phase out of the EU at the end of this year. Andrew Varga runs SEETU, which makes safety valves, and Simon Boyd runs Reid Steel. And John Pickering, head of German domestic appliance manufacturer Miele in the UK tells us how European businesses see things developing. Also in the programme, despite a drive ongoing to reduce the amount of plastic people are using once and then throwing away, companies are still looking at possible alternative materials. Lise Honsinger is co-founder and chief operating officer of Notpla, and tells us about the firm's containers for food and liquids, which are made from seaweed.
09
SEP
1am

Update: Tesla shares tumble

Electric car company Tesla's share tumble almost 20 percent after it failed to be included in the S&P 500 index. Richard Waters, the Financial Times West Coast Editor in San Francisco explains. And Joe Slauzzi of Themis trading explains why the Nasdaq fell over 4%
08
SEP
7pm

The challenge of reopening theatre

As British lawmakers consider the possible reopening of theatres, we examine the issues. Charlotte Geeves is executive director for the Bristol Old Vic in the west of England, and Robin Hawkes is executive director of the Leeds Playhouse, who also sits on a government working group on entertainment and events. And we get further context from Lucy Noble, artistic and commercial director of the Royal Albert Hall in London, who also chairs the UK National Arenas Association. Later in the programme, South Africa has revealed the extent of the economic damage caused by its strict lockdown earlier this year, with economic activity in the three months to June halving compared to the previous quarter. The BBC's Matthew Davies tells us which parts of the economy were hit hardest. Plus, as a row between Beijing and Washington over the Chinese video sharing app TikTok continues, China has drafted rules it is calling the Global Data Security Initiative that it wants the rest of the world to adopt. Emma Wright specialises in technology and digital media at the law firm Kemp Little, and is a director at the Institute of AI, and considers the implications.
07
SEP
5pm

Nigeria reopens aviation for some airlines

Whilst Nigeria has reopened airspace to some airlines many including KLM are still banned. Yemi Dada is a civil aviation consultant who tells us how Nigerians are responding to the latest changes. Also in the programme, it's reported that the UK government is planning legislation that would override the legality of the withdrawal agreement signed as part of the Brexit process, in preparation for the possibility of no deal being reached on a future free trade agreement. Russ Mould of investment analysts AJ Bell considers whether businesses on both sides are prepared for a potential no deal scenario. Thousands of online shoppers in the US have been sent unsolicited packets of seeds in the mail, mostly from China. The online retailer Amazon has now banned foreign sales of seeds in the US, as the BBC's Zoe Kleinman explains. And we get further context from Dr Lisa Ward, of the Royal Horticultural Society. The BBC's Tamasin Ford reports on the challenges faced by older people in the workforce. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Pilita Clark, considers the art of learning to say no in the office.
07
SEP
2am

India has second highest Coronavirus cases in the world

India has second highest Coronavirus cases in the world. We hear from one business owner struggling to survive and the BBC’s Ambarasan Ethirajan considers the impact on India’s economy. The clock is ticking for Tik Tok, which has a deadline to sell its US arm. Chris Stokel Walker considers what now for the app, now the Chinese Government has put in new rules governing technology exports of Chinese companies which could prevent a sale. And we hear from Charlette N’Guessen, the Royal Academy of Engineering's 2020 Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation.

( Pic Credit: Getty Images)
05
SEP
12am

Update: SoftBank revealed as ‘Nasdaq whale’

In the last day or so it's emerged that Softbank, the giant Japanese investment company has been taking massive positions in technology stocks which is part of the reason for the recent tech rally. We hear from Robin Wigglesworth, one of the journalists to break the story; he's the Financial Times' Global Finance Correspondent. And Chris Low from FHN Financial tells us how the market reacted to the revelations.
04
SEP
12am

Update:Tech stocks tumble

Cary Leahey tells us why tech stocks took a battering today, plus the French government has announced €100 billion of spending after the economy shrank by almost 14% between April and June - the biggest quarterly fall since the end of the Second World War. We hear from David Thesmar, Professor of Financial Economics at MIT Sloan in New England and Aymeric Prigent from environmentally-friendly construction firm, ACCORT-Paille. Facebook is pledging not to allow new political adverts in the seven days prior to the US election in November; we hear from Graham Brookie from the Atlantic Council, a group that tracks disinformation. The English Premier League has terminated a $750m deal with a big Chinese firm, curtailing live matches on the PPTV network. We ask Kieran Maguire, football finance expert at Liverpool University, what's going on?
03
SEP
5pm

France's multibillion Euro boost

The French government has announced €100 billion of spending after the economy shrank by almost 14% between April and June - the biggest quarterly fall since the end of the Second World War. Thierry Drilhon, President of the Franco-British Chamber of Commerce, tells us the rescue package should re-ignite the economy. McDonald's, makers of the famous Big Mac burger, plan to start legal proceedings against Burger King because their Australian franchise Hungry Jack's have brought out the 'Big Jack' burger. We hear from Michaela Whitbourn, legal affairs reporter at the Sydney Morning Herald newspaper. And with the strain of working during a pandemic taking its toll on the world's workers, Monica Miller has been talking to some people who have turned to new - and sometimes unconventional - methods to manage their stress.

38 episodes

« Back 13—24 More »