Subscribe to this channel

You can subscribe to new audio episodes published on this channel. You can follow updates using the channel's RSS feed, or via other audio platforms you may already be using.

RSS Feed

You can use any RSS feed reader to follow updates, even your browser. We recommend using an application dedicated to listening podcasts for the best experience. iOS users can look at Overcast or Castro. Pocket Casts is also very popular and has both iOS and Android versions. Add the above link to the application to follow this podcast channel.

Signup to iono.fm

Sign up for a free iono.fm user account to start building your playlist of podcast channels. You'll be able to build a personalised RSS feed you can follow or listen with our web player.
25
FEB
8pm

Xi Jinping Clears Way to Rule China Indefinitely

China's governing Communist Party has proposed removing a clause in the constitution that limits presidents to two five-year terms. The move would allow the current President Xi Jinping to remain as leader after he is due to step down. Dr Yu Jie, head of China Foresight at LSE IDEAS shared her immediate reaction to the surprising news.We're also joined by independent economist Michael Hughes, who sees a downward trend in this coming month's purchasing managers' index.For the eighth consecutive year, Hong Kong has topped US planning consultancy Demographia's list of least affordable cities. James Law of James Law Cybertecture tells Manuela Saragosa his prototype solution to the problem.And finally, a painting described as the "African Mona Lisa." It was recently discovered in a north London flat after being considered lost for 40 years and goes on sale in London on Wednesday. Giles Peppiatt, head of African, Modern and Contemporary Art at auction house Bonham's takes us through the unique history of Ben Enwonwu's "Tutu".
23
FEB
11am

China Seizes Control of Insurance Giant Anbang

In an unusual move, Anbang Insurance will be run by the Chinese government for one year. Tom Hancock of the Financial Times in Beijing explains why China has made the move. Also in the programme, Scotch whisky producers are taking the makers of German whisky Glen Buchenbach to court because they think the name makes it sound like it is Scottish. Jurgen Klotz of Waldhorn, which makes Glen Buchenbach describes his company's defence, and we get context from Edinburgh-based whisky consultant Blair Bowman. As work begins on Saudi Arabia's first opera house, we hear about its prospects from Norman Lebrecht, who is a commentator on music and opera. Plus we look back at the rest of the week's big business stories with Stephanie Baker of Bloomberg in London, and Patrick Foulis from The Economist in New York.
22
FEB
6pm

Update: US pharma industry hit with opioid lawsuits

The city of Brunswick, Ohio has joined hundreds of other jurisdictions across the United States to file a lawsuit against the pharmaceutical companies that make opioids. The epidemic of addiction has caused an extraordinary number of fatalities. We hear from Dr Richard Blondell, Professor Family Medicine at the University at Buffalo in upstate New York and we also get the view of the man charged with overseeing the plethora of lawsuits against the opioid makers - District Judge Dan Polster of Cleveland, Ohio.On the markets, it was a tough day for social media company Snap which owns the app, Snap Chat. Shares in the company fell more than 8.4% following a tweet from one of its celebrity users, Kylie Jenner. Cary Leahy from Decision Economics explains what happened.
22
FEB
11am

Ford Executive Leaves Over Inappropriate Behaviour

A top executive at the motor company Ford is sacked amid allegations of sexual misconduct. We hear more from Keith Hunt, a Chicago-based lawyer who has been handling cases for women who say they've been mistreated on the shop floor of two of Ford's factories in the city. Also in the programme, we have a report from Calais on preparations being made there for new customs rules after Brexit, and Oliver Conger of British manufacturer Rototherm discusses his concerns about any changes to customs procedures after Britain leaves the EU. As diamond miner De Beers unveils its latest earnings, we hear from its chief executive Bruce Cleaver. A federal court in Germany has begun hearing a case on whether to ban diesel cars from two of the country's biggest cities. Greg Archer is an environmental campaigner at Transport and Environment in Brussels, and explains the background to the case. Plus as Britain prepares to celebrate two royal weddings and a birth, our reporter looks at what that will mean for the nation's memorabilia makers.
21
FEB
6pm

Update: Australia slides further in global corruption index

Transparency International has published its latest Corruption Perceptions Index - assessing the perceived levels of public sector corruption in 180 countries.While countries like Senegal have climbed up this year's rankings, Australia's score has fallen. Maggie Murphy, Senior Global Advocacy Manager at Transparency International, explains why.Doug McIntrye, editor of the financial news and commentary website 24/7 Wall Street, assesses the latest minutes from the US Federal Reserve.
21
FEB
11am

South Africa's 2018 Budget Revealed

South Africa's finance minister Malusi Gigaba has outlined his country's spending plans. Gina Schoeman is an economist at Citibank in Johannesburg, and assesses the proposals. And we get reaction from Yunus Carrim of the ruling ANC, who is chairman of the parliament's finance standing committee, and Alf Lees, deputy finance spokesman for the opposition Democratic Alliance party. Also in the programme, following a recommendation by the US Commerce Department to impose tariffs on imports of steel and aluminium, Scott Paul of the Alliance for American Manufacturing explains why he supports the idea, and our regular economic commentator Irwin Stelzer of the Hudson Institute tells us why he is opposed. Our reporter in Senegal takes a trip with a motorbike radio traffic reporter on the streets of Dakar. Plus there are protests in Italy at Brazilian firm Embraco's intention to move domestic appliance production from Turin to a site in Slovakia. Enrico Colombatto is professor of economics at Turin University, and brings us the background to the dispute.
20
FEB
6pm

Update: Walmart shares plunge after disappointing results

US retailer Walmart has announced a 42% drop in earnings, despite an increase in sales. We ask Bryan Roberts, author of a book about the retail giant, if it is losing the online battle with Amazon.India is to allow private firms to mine coal for commercial use. The BBC's Suranjana Tewari in Mumbai explains the background.Also in the programme, as Venezuela launches its own oil-backed cryptocurrency, our regular economic commentator Roger Bootle assesses the health of the cryptocurrency sector.We have a report from Spain on a flurry of corruption scandals that have been plaguing politics in the country.
20
FEB
11am

India Opens Coal Mining to Competition

India is to allow private firms to mine coal for commercial use. The BBC's Suranjana Tewari in Mumbai explains the background. Also in the programme, as Venezuela launches its own oil-backed cryptocurrency, our regular economic commentator Roger Bootle assesses the health of the cryptocurrency sector. We have a report from Spain on a flurry of corruption scandals that have been plaguing politics in the country. US retailer Walmart has announced a 42% drop in earnings, despite an increase in sales. Neil Saunders is managing director of GlobalData Retail, and interprets the firm's latest results. Plus we discuss with John Stables, a media barrister at 5 Raymond Buildings, the case of a comedian who is facing a defamation lawsuit over jokes she made about her ex-husband.
19
FEB
6pm

Update: Israel and Egypt Signal Closer Ties with $15bn Gas Deal

The operators of Israel's giant gas fields have agreed to supply Egypt. Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu says it will boost the economy and strengthen diplomatic ties.Are more deals in the pipeline? We ask Tareq Baconi, a fellow with the European Council on Foreign Relations' Middle East and North Africa programme.Troubled Venezuela is launching a commodity-backed "petro" cryptocurrency. The BBC's Daniel Gallas explains why.Bank of Latvia's Ilmars Rimsevics has been arrested by Latvia's anti-corruption agency. Sanita Yemburga is executive editor of the Baltic Centre for Investigative Journalism in Riga, and brings us the details.Also in the programme, police in India have sealed off the Mumbai branch of a bank at the centre of a $1.8bn loan fraud. Sushma Ramachandran is a business journalist in Delhi, and explains the background to the case.Plus, with 10 out of 12 artists to scoop awards at France's biggest music awards signed to independent music labels, Emmanuel de Buretel of Because Music explains how small labels have been able to nurture new talent.
19
FEB
11am

Latvian Central Bank Boss Detained

Bank of Latvia's Ilmars Rimsevics has been arrested by Latvia's anti-corruption agency. Sanita Yemburger is executive editor of the Baltic Centre for Investigative Journalism in Riga, and brings us the details. Also in the programme, police in India have sealed off the Mumbai branch of a bank at the centre of a $1.8bn loan fraud. Sushma Ramachandran is a business journalist in Delhi, and explains the background to the case. The UK's Equality and Human Rights Commission has found that four in 10 employers feel that pregnancy puts an 'unnecessary cost burden' on the workplace. We find out more from the EHRC's head of employment, Sue Coe. We ask whether a substantial loan from the World Bank to Nigeria to try and tackle the country's power shortages is likely to have the desired effect. Plus, with 10 out of 12 artists to scoop awards at France's biggest music awards signed to independent music labels, Emmanuel de Buretel of Because Music explains how small labels have been able to nurture new talent.
18
FEB
8pm

Latvia's Central Bank Governor Detained in Corruption Probe

Latvia's finance minister has called for Ilmars Rimsevics to step aside to protect the country’s reputation.Sanita Jemberger, executive editor of The Baltic Centre for Investigative Journalism, explains the significance of the move.Japanese exports have climbed for a 14th consecutive month, underscoring solid global demand for the country's goods.But Yuuichiro Nakajima, managing director of Crimson Phoenix, says policymakers will need to do more to secure a recovery in the world's third largest economy.China and India are fighting for a slice of the Bangladesh stock exchange. Arafat Kabir, a Forbes contributor on South Asian affairs, delves into the politics and economics of a potential deal.And we look ahead to the South African budget with independent economist Michael Hughes.

38 episodes

« Back 1—12 More »