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14
OCT
8pm

Italy's Budget Challenges EU Debt Rules

Monday is the deadline for the countries that use the Euro currency to submit their budget plans to the European Commission. Italy's proposed budget breaks EU rules on how much a country is allowed to go into debt. We get analysis from Nicola Borri, a professor of Economics at Luiss University in Rome. Following a series of weekend of meetings, and no breakthrough on Brexit, what will European leaders have to discuss at their summit on Wednesday? Grace Blakeley, research fellow with the Institute for Public Policy Research, tells us about the challenge of balancing political considerations against measures to protect the UK economy after Brexit. The global ports operator DP World is building a container terminal in Somaliland, even though it is not international recognised as a country. We hear from its chairman Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem. China has been accused of keeping the value of the yuan artificially low to boost exports. Ahead of a US Treasury report on currency manipulation, our regular economic commentator Michael Hughes has been assessing China's currency strategy.
And it's a year since a post on Twitter boosted the 'MeToo' campaign and galvanised women to come forward with allegations of sexual misconduct, notably in the media industry. Entertainment reporter KJ Matthews explains what it has meant for Hollywood.
12
OCT
7pm

Companies Boycott Saudi Investor Conference

Companies and media organisations are boycotting an investor conference in Saudi Arabia. Amid rising concern about the disappearance in Turkey of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Also in the programme, should lithium be traded on the London Metals Exchange?
And - you buy a purse at Walmart. There's a note inside - apparently from a prisoner in China - saying I made your nice new bag - and I'm incarcerated in terrible conditions and the guards are stealing my food. What do you do? What does Walmart do? For journalist Rossalyn Warren the note led to a detective operation that took her halfway around the world in search of answers.
12
OCT
11am

Companies Boycott Saudi Investor Conference

Companies and media organisations are boycotting an investor conference in Saudi Arabia. Amid rising concern about the disappearance in Turkey of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, we get analysis from Jeanne Whaley of the Washington Post. Also in the programme, we have reports from Indonesia on the challenges of providing clean water residents of the city of Bandung, and asking whether the growth of social media could be fueling a new rise in radicalism in the country. Plus we look back at the rest of the week's big business stories with Lisa Abramowicz of Bloomberg in New York, and Nina Trentmann of the Wall Street Journal in London.
11
OCT
11am

Share Markets Wobble Following US Sell-off

European and Asian share markets were down following a sell-off in the US on Wednesday. Susan Schmidt is head of US equities at Aviva Investors in Chicago, and analyses the latest moves. Also in the programme, we talk to Paul Romer, one of two economists to receive the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences this week. We have a report from India on the home grown media companies taking on Netflix and Amazon Prime in the video streaming world. As Singapore Airlines launches the world's longest flight, between Singapore and New York, Brendan Sobie of the Centre for Aviation in Singapore tells us what's behind the move. Plus we meet some space tourism entrepreneurs at the Future in Review conference in Utah.
10
OCT
11am

Protests in Hong Kong Parliament over Press Freedom

Some legislators in Hong Kong chanted for press freedom during a leader's address. Lawmaker Alvin Yeung of the Hong Kong Civic Party, who took part in the protest, tells us why. Also in the programme, a committee of the European Parliament has voted in favour of a ban on ten kinds of plastic most often found on Europe's beaches. Seb Dance is a member of the European parliament for the British Labour party, and tells us how the proposed ban would work. Sultan Ahmed bin Sulayem, chairman of one of the world's largest container ports operators, DP World, explains why he does not want to continue operating in Djibouti, after authorities there seized the company's stake in the country's main container terminal. Plus we have reports from Indonesia exploring opposition to build a coal plant in northern Bali, and examining the challenges around punctuality of business meetings in the country.
09
OCT
7pm

Wall Street Update: South Africa Has A New Finance Minister

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa has just sworn in a new finance minister, the sixth in four years. The BBC's Nomsa Maseko tells us about the newcomer, Tito Mboweni. Also in the show, Ireland's finance minister has unveiled the country's latest budget. We get analysis from the BBC's Russell Padmore. And we'll get a view from Wall Street from Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading in New York.
09
OCT
11am

Google to Unveil New Devices

Google may be hoping a launch of new devices will distract from a data breach. BBC technology reporter Zoe Kleinman gives us the context, and tells us what to expect from the product launch. Also in the programme, Pakistan's precarious finances seem to have pushed the country's new prime minister, Imran Khan, to consider seeking a bailout from the International Monetary Fund. Khurram Husain is business editor at the Dawn newspaper, and explains the country's economic challenges. Ireland's finance minister has unveiled the country's latest budget. We get analysis from Austin Hughes, chief economist at KBC Ireland. In the wake of last month's earthquake in Indonesia, we have a report from Sulawesi that there are some signs of normal life returning. Plus, new research from the British Film Institute suggests that tax relief for films, television series and videogames made in the UK has led to a boom in production in the country. Amanda Nevill is chief executive of the BFI and discusses the findings.
08
OCT
6pm

Wall Street Update: Latest On Brazil And Pakistan Goes To The IMF

Jair Bolsonaro is the favourite into the second round of Brazil's presidential election. The BBC's Julia Carneiro gives us the latest on the country's reaction and what happens now. Also in the programme, Pakistan's foreign minister has asked the IMF for a bailout, we'll hear from Nadeem Haque, former deputy chairman of Pakistan's Planning Commission and a former IMF senior resident representative. And we'll get an update from Wall Street with Peter Jankovskis of Oakbrook Investment in Chicago.
08
OCT
11am

Jair Bolsonaro Wins First Round of Brazil Election

Jair Bolsonaro is the favourite into the second round of Brazil's presidential election. The BBC's Daniel Gallas in Sao Paulo tells us what Mr Bolsonaro's economic policies would look like. Also in the programme, the UN has released its starkest warning yet about the dangers posed by rising global temperatures. Dr Ruth Valerio of the UK relief and development agency Tearfund explains what might happen if global temperature rises are not kept below two degrees celsius. Facebook has been criticised over what some see as its small tax bill in the United Kingdom. Paul Monaghan from Fair Tax Mark talks us through how the social network's tax affairs are organised. Dira Sugandi is one of the biggest singing stars in Indonesia, and discusses how the music business operates in her country. Plus our regular workplace commentator Alison Green considers how best to get your boss or co-worker to stop or start doing things that would make your office hours more bearable.
07
OCT
8pm

Brazil's Election Leads to Run-Off

Large numbers of Brazilians have been voting in the most polarised presidential election for many years. With 94% of the vote counted, far-right candidate Jair Bolsonaro has 46.8% of the vote, surprising some pollsters but remaining just shy of the 50% needed to avoid a run-off election, giving hope to main rival, Fernando Haddad, the left-wing candidate for the Workers' Party. We’re joined by the BBC’s Latin America Business correspondent Daniel Gallas for the latest, and Verrisk Maplecroft analyst Jimena Blanco gives the political context.

Later this month the European Union will reveal its new "Asia connectivity strategy" which could be a rival to China’s Belt and Road economic plan. It will be unveiled in time for a big EU Asia summit. Maaike Okano-Heijmans, EU-Asia relations expert at the Clingendael Institute in the Netherlands, discusses the EU's potential strategy.

We’ll also hear from independent economist Michael Hughes, and the BBC reporter Jonathan Bithrey is in Jakarta exploring the issue of climate change and its man-made impacts across South East Asia.

38 episodes

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