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27
OCT
6pm

Update: Will US spending plan end deadlock?

There are intensive discussions on Capitol Hill to try and break the deadlock over President Biden's proposed $3.5 trillion spending plans. Those plans have led to deep divisions in his own Democratic Party. So how close to a deal are we? We ask independent financial analyst Peter Jankowskis.
27
OCT
6pm

Update: Will US spending plan deadlock end?

There are intensive discussions on Capitol Hill to try and break the deadlock over President Biden's proposed $3.5 trillion spending plans. Those plans have led to deep divisions in his own Democratic Party. So how close to a deal are we? We ask independent financial analyst Peter Jankowskis.
27
OCT
11am

Checking in with the UK economy

The UK economy was hit incredibly hard by the pandemic and its recovery is not yet complete. The government has said the economy should return to its pre-Covid level at the turn of the year -- earlier than previously thought. But it's still several months after the US reached the same point. In the annual budget announced today, the UK finance minister said that economic growth will be be back to pre-pandemic levels by the end of 2022 and for the public to expect inflation to hit 4%. We get analysis from economist Roger Bootle on how the UK is faring relative to other countries in Europe and beyond.

Also in the programme, we look at why has the iconic French fashion house Jean Paul Gaultier - known for cone-shaped corsets worn by Madonna for example - decided to allow people to rent some of its most iconic pieces?

And - Fergus Nicoll investigates what efforts are some cities making to combat climate change.
26
OCT
6pm

Update: US revokes China Telecom licence

Citing national security concerns, the US revokes China Telecom's licence to operate in US. We speak with the BBC's Zhaoyin Feng in Washington. Plus, Scott Nations from NationsShares in the US gives us the latest on the US stock markets.
25
OCT
7pm

Update: Facebook reports growth despite controversies

Facebook's latest financial results showed better than expected earnings. It comes as the whistleblower Frances Haugen appeared in front of the UK parliament and told MPs that the social media company was "unquestionably making hate worse". Vivienne Nunis asks Imran Ahmed, Chief Executive of the Center for Combating Digital Hate, whether he agrees. Plus, Tesla surpassed a market value of $1 trillion on Monday. Shares in the electric automaker climbed nearly 13% after it struck a deal to sell 100,000 vehicles to the car rental company Hertz. Bloomberg's Business reporter Dana Hull discusses Tesla's fortunes.
25
OCT
11am

Coca-Cola named world's biggest plastic polluter

Coca-Cola has been named as the world’s biggest plastic polluter. The drinks company sells over 100 billion throwaway bottles every year. Rob Young asks how we can reduce the amount of plastic we use and is joined by Emma Priestland from the research group Break Free from Plastic. Plus, we get a preview from a special BBC investigation into Coca-Cola’s plastic pledges.
Also this half hour: should the private sector step in to save the Amazon from destruction? We hear how deforestation mapping could be one way of identifying the challenges ahead.
And do we really need to be able to spell in this age of autocorrect? Our regular commentator Peter Morgan shares his views.
24
OCT
8pm

ASEAN summit quandry

The 10 member countries of the ASEAN group of nations, like Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam will hold a summit in Brunei this week. But Tuesday's meeting has already run into controversy, after the group excluded Myanmar, amid concerns about the military rulers undermining democracy. Countries in South East Asia are also wary of taking sides in the economic and political standoff between China and the United States and Beijing's growing dominance in the region is causing concern. Also in the programme, why are more Americans buying homes in areas where the risk of wild weather is greater? Plus, the expansion of Russian energy exploration in the Arctic. And - in China the police have adopted an unusual method of encouraging senior citizens to recognise fraud. Officers give lessons in how to avoid becoming a victim of a scam, but then test the older people on what they've learned in class, with those who pass offered free products from a local supermarket.
22
OCT
7pm

Update: China seeks to dominate AI

US officials are warning about China's ambitions in artificial intelligence, saying that the country could come to dominate in the field, giving the country unprecedented military advantage. Chris Meserole, an AI researcher with the Brookings in Washington DC, explains the concern. Also in the programme, we'll have a check-in on the day's trading on Wall Street, from FHN Financial's Chris Low.
22
OCT
11am

The threat of rising inflation

France is to pay low income families €100 each to cushion the impact of rising inflation. Meanwhile the Bank of England's chief economist has warned inflation could hit 5% in the UK in the months ahead. With prices on the rise all over the world as a result of widespread supply chain disruptions and the high cost of energy, we examine the implications of rising inflation with Helen Thomas of the economic consultancy Blonde Money. Also in the programme, Ireland had hoped to relax most coronavirus public health measures today, though with cases rising, plans have been scaled back. Whilst nightclubs and other live entertainment venues can open, digital vaccine certificates will be required for indoor hospitality venues like restaurants, cafes and pubs. Adrian Cummins is chief executive of the Restaurants Association of Ireland, and discusses the implications. Plus, the BBC's Rahul Tandon explores the future of lavish Indian weddings, after they got a lot smaller during the pandemic.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Clare Williamson.

(Picture: Petrol pump prices. Picture credit: Getty Images.)
21
OCT
7pm

WeWork shares jump more than 13 per cent in public markets debut

Shares of WeWork closed up more than 13.49 per cent on Thursday after the company went public through a special purpose acquisition, more than two years after its failed IPO. We hear from Peter Eavis of The New York Times, who has been following the ups and downs of the company.

Plus, the Austrian city of Vienna is known for its collection of art galleries and museums. But some of the exhibits, it seems, are a little too racy for some social media networks. So the tourism board is posting images on the website OnlyFans, the only social network that permits depictions of nudity. We hear from Norbert Kettner of the Vienna Tourist Board.

Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors, in Chicago, tells us about the day's trading on Wall Street.
21
OCT
11am

Poland row overshadows EU summit

A dispute between Brussels and Warsaw threatens to overshadow a summit for EU leaders. A Polish court recently found parts of EU law were incompatible with the country's constitution, and there have been calls from some quarters to withhold EU funds from Poland in response. Anna Wojcik is a researcher at the Polish Academy of Sciences and editor of the Rule of Law publication, and discusses the background to the dispute. Also in the programme, shares in the Chinese property conglomerate Evergrande fell by 11.5% when they resumed trading in Hong Kong today. Sherry Fei Ju is a freelance journalist in Beijing, and brings us the latest developments. The BBC's Theo Leggett tells us about research at the University of Mannheim in Germany that indicates governments worldwide may have lost around $175bn in revenue, because of tax schemes relating to the payments companies make to their shareholders. It's the beginning of India's festival season, and our workplace commentator Sandip Roy considers the challenges of trying to work through the mega festival Durga Puja, when millions are on the streets partying til dawn. Plus, ahead of next month's World Cheese Awards in Oviedo northern Spain, judge Morgan McGlynn, who is also a British cheesemaker, explains what makes a winning cheese.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Clare Williamson.

(Picture: Poland's prime minister arrives at the European Council meeting. Picture credit: Reuters.)
20
OCT
7pm

Update: Tesla profit and Latvia in lockdown

We go to Brazil where president Jair Bolsonaro is rejecting accusations of prioritising the economy over the health of his people during the height of the covid pandemic - journalist Karla Mendes in Sao Paolo tells us more. Latvia goes in to lockdown as coronavirus cases rise; we hear from Inga Springe, an investigative journalist in the country. Finally, Tesla reports an uptick in revenue compared with the same period last year, hitting all the expectations of happy investors, says Susan Schmidt of Aviva in the US.

39 episodes

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