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23
APR

Twitter users and revenue up

The social media giant Twitter has attracted more users, and earnings are up significantly. But the firm is still mired in controversy over the amount of hate speech on the platform. We hear from women who have suffered abuse and find out more about founder Jack Dorsey's plans to tackle the problem. The fashion industry has been criticised by MPs in the UK as a major source of the greenhouse gases that are overheating the planet. But just how easy is it to produce more sustainable clothes in an age of ‘fast fashion’? We ask American fashion designer Misha Nonoo, who is known for her line of women’s ready to wear clothing. Plus, a growing number of professionals are choosing to relax to the sound of large metal gongs. The BBC's Deborah Weitzmann has been finding out why.
22
APR

US to end sanction exemptions for major importers

US President Donald Trump has decided to end exemptions from sanctions for countries still buying oil from Iran. The White House said waivers for China, India, Japan, South Korea and Turkey would expire in May, after which they could face US sanctions themselves. We speak to Suzanne Maloney from the Brookings Institute.

Samsung has postponed the release of its folding smartphone, days after several early reviewers said the screens on their devices had broken. The BBC's technology reporter discusses what this could mean for the company.

The global chocolate industry is worth 100 billion dollars yet African producers only make about eight per cent of that, according to research by the International Cocoa Organisation. Rather than export the raw fruit, entrepreneurs in cocoa-rich countries are now starting to make their own chocolate in an effort to change things, as the BBC’s West Africa correspondent Louise Dewast has been finding out.

Roger Hearing is joined for comment throughout the programme by chief economist at Complete Intelligence Tony Nash in Texas and The Financial Times' Correspondent in Bejing Yuan Yan.
22
APR

Samsung postpones the launch of its new folding-screen mobile phone

Samsung has postponed the release of its folding smartphone, days after several early reviewers said the screens on their devices had broken. The BBC's Technology Reporter Chris Fox explains. Ukrainian comedian Volodymyr Zelensky has scored a landslide victory in the country's presidential election. In a case of life imitating art, on television Zelensky has played the part of a teacher who accidently becomes president. The price of oil has risen after President Trump confirmed the US would end sanction waivers for buyers of Iranian oil. Stephen Innes, Head of Trading at SPI Asset Management, explains the consequences this will have on Iran. An outbreak of African Swine Fever has hit pig farms in China, so consumers around the world could soon be paying much more for pork, as we hear from the BBC's Russell Padmore. The global chocolate industry is worth 100 billion dollars yet African producers only make about eight per cent of that, according to research by the International Cocoa Organisation. Rather than export the raw fruit, entrepreneurs in cocoa-rich countries are now starting to make their own chocolate in an effort to change things, as the BBC’s West Africa correspondent Louise Dewast has been finding out.
21
APR

Comedian Wins Ukraine's Vote

Ukrainian comedian Volodymyr Zelensky has won a landslide victory in the country's presidential election, exit polls suggest. Uganda re-launches its national carrier - but will an all new Uganda Air soar? And a petition is almost complete in the Netherlands, intended to criminalise prostitution. Plus a 209 carat diamond, as big and heavy as a golf ball, goes up for auction.
19
APR

Threat of tariffs looms over New York Auto Show

The New York Auto Show begins today, with the threat of new tariffs being held over the international car industry by President Donald Trump. The BBC's Michelle Fleury is there. For decades pilots and cabin crew worldwide have been arguing that toxic air on-board the planes they fly has been making them - and passengers - ill. The industry says there’s no such thing as ‘Aerotoxicity', but scientists and doctors have suggested otherwise. The BBC's Mike Powell brings us up to date on this story. Haiti's foreign minister Bocchit Edmond tells us how his country is trying to reinvigorate its coffee industry, decimated by an earthquake nine years ago. Plus, payouts by pet insurers in the UK hit a record £785m in 2018, even though the number of claims submitted fell, according to the industry trade body. We hear why from Malcolm Tarling of the Association of British Insurers.
18
APR

Climate Protests: Disobedience or Inconvenience?

Climate protesters Extinction Rebellion have been organising sit-ins on central London streets in an attempt to make their demands heard. But are they realistic in their aims, such as legally binding policies to reduce carbon emissions to net zero by 2025? And are their disruptive tactics getting more people onside? We speak to activist Kofi Klu, who is taking part, about the power of protest. Reporters Without Borders' World Press Freedom Index is out today, ranking countries on how easy it is to be a journalist. Caroline Muscat, co-founder and editor of The Shift News in Malta explains why the Mediterranean island ranked 77th out of 180. Plus, the social media network Pinterest has launched its IPO today. We ask how the 'mood board' site intends to make money for its investors.
17
APR

Update: Egypt holds referendum on constitutional changes

Egyptians will vote this weekend on changes which will allow the current president, Abd-al-Fatah al-Sisi, to remain in power until 2030. The referendum will last for three days in an attempt to maximise turnout. We hear from Yehia Hamed, a former Minister for Investment, on what an extended term would mean for the country's economy. And could Nokia claw back some 5G market share from Huawei? Stu Woo of the Wall Street Journal in Beijing tells us more.
17
APR

China's economic growth beats expectations

China's economy grew slightly faster than expected in the three months from January to March, official figures released Wednesday showed. The economy expanded at 6.4% in the first quarter from a year earlier, ahead of a Reuters forecast of 6.3%.

Also in the programme, the troubled Indian airline Jet Airways has suspended all its domestic and international flights after failing to find fresh funding. The airline said its last flight would operate on Wednesday as it was not able to pay for fuel and other critical services.

US President Donald Trump is set to nominate several political allies to the Federal Reserve Bank, a move that commentators say might compromise the bank's independence.

And Pakistan’s music industry has faced an uphill battle over the past two decades. But as the BBC's Vivienne Nunis finds out, the industry is fighting back
16
APR

EU gives 'high-level' protection to whistleblowers

Whistleblowers across the European Union have won greater protection under landmark legislation aimed at encouraging reports of wrongdoing. Ironically, employees of the EU and its agencies are not covered by the legislation. We hear from Robert McCoy, who was employed by the EU as a financial controller and suffered harassment at work after he blew the whistle on alleged fraudulent expenses claims. Also in the programme, now that the Notre Dame fire has been extinguished, how can the cathedral be reborn? We ask Robert Read of Hiscox Insurance. Plus, the BBC's Jane Wakefield is at the annual TED Conference in Vancouver, Canada, meeting people with a specific idea of how to change the world for the better
15
APR

Update: Notre-Dame cathedral engulfed by fire

A major fire has engulfed one of France's most famous landmarks - the medieval Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris. Firefighters are battling to save the 850-year-old Gothic building, but its spire and roof have collapsed. The cause is not yet clear, but officials say that it could be linked to renovation work.

Also in the show, with the outgoing head of Alibaba suggesting that working 12 hours a day, 6 days a week might not be the worst thing in the world, we ask whether pushing yourself to the limit is actually good for productivity.

And we'll have a regular view on the US markets from Peter Jankovskis at Oakbrook Investments in Chicago.
10
APR

Japan nuclear disaster residents return

A town evacuated after Japan's 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster has partially reopened. William McMichael is a Canadian who moved to Fukushima prefecture 12 years ago to work as a professor of economics, and describes his mission to combat misinformation about the disaster. And we consider the future of nuclear power with German Member of the European Parliament, Joe Leinen, whose country decided to switch off the power source from 2022, and Dr Paul Dorfman, of the anti-nuclear Nuclear Consulting Group in discussion with Dr Jonathan Cobb, of the World Nuclear Association, which represents the global nuclear industry. Also in the programme, in the wake of the departure of President Trump's Homeland Security secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, we discuss US immigration policy with our regular economic commentator, Irwin Stelzer of the Hudson Institute. The UK Supreme Court has ruled in favour of a group of Zambians, in a case against the mining giant Vedanta. Our reporter Russell Padmore was in court, and explains the ruling. Plus as the Indian election season gets under way, we travel to Kolkata to meet some political rally participants who are being paid to show up.

(Picture: Some residents returning to look at cherry blossom. Picture credit: Getty Images.)
08
APR

Libyan oil exports disrupted by fresh violence

The crisis in Libya has worsened in the last few hours with an airstrike that has closed the country's only functioning international airport in the capital, Tripoli. Libya's oil exports have ben severely disrupted, which has a global impact on the oil price, as we hear from Helima Croft, oil specialist with RBC Capital Markets in New York. Plus Peter Jankovskis of Oakbrook Investments in Chicago on the day's trading.

38 episodes

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