Ouch! Disability Talk Show

BBC  |  Podcast , ±26 min episodes every 1 week  | 
Every month, Rob Crossan and Kate Monaghan present the programme you didn’t know you wanted to hear. It's disability from a fresh angle featuring interviews, discussion and the occasional quiz. The (disabled) presenters dissect and analyse recent events with interest and a good dose of healthy humour.

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25
MAY
2018

How do you learn the trapeze if you’re blind?

Amelia Cavallo has mastered the art of aerial performance on silks and the trapeze at great heights above the floor. As someone who is registered blind, how does she know how high up she is and where the silk or trapeze will be when she lets go as part of a trick? And how often does she end up on the crash mat? Cavallo is performing as part of new circus show, What Am I Worth? It’s a collaboration with disabled performers and musicians and asks society a very pertinent question. Presented by Beth Rose.
18
MAY
2018

Bibliotherapy: A novel take on mental health

Reading is often the first things to go when you're busy - your bag's already full and you've got your phone to play with - but could picking up a book be one simple way to help boost or maintain your mental health?It's Mental Health Awareness Week and here at BBC Ouch we're not missing out so this podcast is all about how a good book could be a good thing - and we're not talking self-help books - we're talking any and every genre.It's thought books can help you set targets and find focus, even if you can't get out of bed because of depression. They let you see that awkward situation you've been anxious about for weeks from someone else's perspective and you might even learn how to be empathetic or find your way into a new community.Presented by Niamh Hughes with Beth Rose, blogger Harriet Allner and academic Dr Paula Byrne
11
MAY
2018

Turning to snow to meet my mother

Tatyana McFadden was born in Russia with spina bifida - a deformity of the spine - and placed in a Russian orphanage. Aged six she was adopted by an American and became one of Team USA's most successful athletes.In the second part of the interview with the McFadden's, Tatyana's adopted mother, Deborah, talks about the rare illness which temporarily paralysed her from the neck down and Tatyana explains the snowy challenge she took on to meet up with her birth-mother. Presented by Beth Rose with Tatyana and Deborah McFadden.You can find a link to part one of the interview, From Russian orphan to Team USA, in the related links.
04
MAY
2018

Life in the dark shadow of Mini-Me

Verne Troyer played Mini-Me in the Austin Powers films. Following his recent death, fellow short person Eugene Grant says the character normalised violent attacks against others with dwarfism.Plus, as exam season gets underway, what’s it doing to your mental health? Hear how your teacher could have given you maths anxiety. And meet the artist who gives her drawings away - as therapy.Presented by Kate Monaghan and Simon Minty.(Photo: Verne Troyer Credit: Reuters)Clip of Britain’s Got Talent courtesy of FreemantleMedia
27
APR
2018

From Russian orphan to Team USA

Tatyana McFadden was born in Russia with spina bifida - a deformity of the spine - and placed in Orphanage Three, Saint Petersburg.But at the age of six, a chance meeting with an American dignitary would change her life. She would discover wheelchair racing and go on to win 17 Paralympic medals and multiple marathon titles for Team USA, but there would also be a high profile legal battle against the US government.Presented by Beth Rose with Tatyana McFadden and her adopted mother, Deborah.
20
APR
2018

Hellblade: Psychosis story ‘mirrored mine’

The game Hellblade: Sensua's Sacrifice has won many awards and fans for its story and the way it depicts psychosis.It follows Nordic warrior, Senua, on a quest to rescue the soul of her dead lover. She hears voices, and experiences hallucinations throughout, disorientating the player. Gamers and experts rate its portrayal of the mental illness - but does it go down well with people who have psychosis in real life? Danny Bowyer first experienced psychosis in his early 20s and has played the game. He explains how he hears voices continually - including while talking to the BBC Ouch team on this podcast. Presented by Beth Rose with Kathleen Hawkins and Niamh Hughes.
06
APR
2018

Electronic voices: How Hawking let me talk too

Comedian Lost Voice Guy tells Ouch that the late Stephen Hawking made it more acceptable for people like him, who speak using a voice synth. Also, should the professor's voice be used again by someone else? And the heat is getting turned up as we hear more stories from wheelchair-users like the BBC's Frank Gardner who have had their wheelchairs damaged when travelling by plane. And, as we continue our programme dedicated to Stephen Hawking, we speak with Peter Beney. He is one of the team who helped recreate Hawking's distinctive electronic voice because it was thought the original one which he had been using since the 80s, would break down. They managed to complete the long-running project just before he died. Baroness Jane Campbell and journalist Ellis Palmer are in the studio.Presented by Kate Monaghan and Simon Minty.Subscribe to Ouch wherever you get your podcasts. Like us, rate us and leave a nice review - this helps others find our programmes. Email ouch@bbc.co.uk Tweet @bbcouch and find us on Facebook. A transcript will appear on this page soon in the Related Links section below.
23
MAR
2018

Ouch takeover: Inspirational speakers

Inspirational speaking and work has long been a part of the disability landscape. But how do you inspire without sounding like a cliché? It’s a confidence boosting takeover on this week’s BBC Ouch podcast.Martyn Sibley and Amar Latif, both of whom are disabled, talk about how they try to instil positive thoughts in others, often using their own achievements to get people into a go-ahead mode. But they are both well aware that the word 'inspiration' can be used in a less than positive way when applied to disabled people. If you have an idea for a future programme, email ouch@bbc.co.uk.Subscribe to Ouch as a weekly podcast and, if you wouldn't mind, we'd be delighted if you reviewed us on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts from - it helps other people find us.
19
MAR
2018

Off-piste at the Paras #9: Ghost town

Two 19 year old women brought home all seven medals for Great Britain from the Winter Paralympics. On the last day, Menna Fitzpatrick and her guide Jennifer Kehoe won a gold medal in the visual impairment slalom. And it was bronze for Millie Knight and guide Brett Wild as the team hit their medal target. Moments after the British flag was raised and the national anthem sung the venue was being dismantled. So what’s next for the Winter Paralympics and PyeongChang? Presented by Beth Rose with JJ Chalmers and Chris Osborne.
16
MAR
2018

Off-piste at the paras #8: Scott Meenagh: Losing my legs in Afghanistan was "a bad day at work"

Could you cover 60km on difficult terrain using just your arms?British Nordic Sit-Skier Scott Meenagh has attempted that this week in the Biathlon and Cross-Country events. He’s the first competitor Paralympics GB has had in Nordic Skiing for 20 years.Meenagh lost both legs after an explosion in Afghanistan.Beth Rose talks to her fellow presenter, JJ Chalmers, about their time in rehab together and the time Scott tested out his new prosthetics on a log-flume.
15
MAR
2018

Off-piste at the paras #7: Ice-hockey

It’s the biggest crowd draw – the ic- hockey – and the locals came out in force to watch South Korea take on Canada.It was a match full of Mexican waves, K-pop and attempts to break the venue’s decibel record for the most amount of noise a crowd could make.With the home team playing, the stadium was packed and the players put on a show when it came to speed, crashes and smashes.Presented by Beth Rose with Chris Osborne.
14
MAR
2018

Back to school

We’re going for a younger sound in this week’s podcast. As part of BBC School Report day 2018, three disabled schoolchildren give us their take on life in the classroom and playground, and much more. Carys, Ashleigh and Kelsey take it in turns to answer questions pulled out of the Ouch tea caddy. Listen to find out what they think about mainstream v special school, uniforms and how the word “blind” translated badly on a trip to France.BBC School Report gives 11-18 year olds across the UK the chance to develop their media literacy skills and produce their own stories about subjects that matter to them.Produced by Lucy Edwards and Damon Rose.

106 episodes

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