African Dialogue

Channel Africa  |  Podcast, ±55 min episodes every 2 days
The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
23
MAY
The African Forest Forum is currently underway in Entebbe Uganda, wjere regional workshops are underway aiming to share knowledge and experiences on issues related to climate change in African forestry. The African Forest Forum is an association which brings together experts and individuals which are committed to the sustainable management and conservation of Africa’s forest and tree resources. To look at this we are now joined by: • Prof. Godwin Kowero, the Executive Secretary of the African Forest Forum, is a Tanzanian professor of forest economics and policy analysis. • Marie-Louise Avana- Tientcheu is the Director of Studies and Lecturers Affairs, University of Dschang- Cameroun/ Coordinator of the International Master curricula in Agroforestry/ Department of Forestry/Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences/ • Dr Marfa Chipeta, FAO Director of Policy Assistance
22
MAY
The killing of women at the hands of their partners in South Africa has seen a phenomenal increase. The recent killing of Karabo Mokoena, a part-time business student, has highlighted not only the killing of women by those who are supposed to love them, but the brutality of it. According to the Medical Research Council, femicide, the murder of a woman by an intimate partner, is one of the leading causes of the death of women in South Africa. Is there distinct psychological traits in men who murder their partners and children? To answer this we are joined on the line by: Bukelwa Moerane: Victim of Violence: Nondumiso Nsiadanda: Tshwaranang Legal Advisory Centre: ) (# Sixteen days of Activism) Bambi Stewart: South Africa’s executive director at Amnesty International: Itumezeng Moloko: Council Manager with the Gender Organisation POWER
18
MAY
Today is International Museums Day. This day has been celebrated since 1977 as a way to raise awareness of the importance of museums around the world. The theme for the acknowledgement of this day for 2017 is Museums and contested histories: Saying the unspeakable in museums. Museums are defined as a non-profit, permanent institution which is used to serve society to conserve, research and exhibit the heritage of communities and the environment. However, in a digital age where information is just a mobile phone away, do people still have interest walking in the four walls of museums to explore heritage and conservation.
17
MAY
Nigeria is in a grip of the worst meningitis outbreak in the country. Identified as meningitis C, the country is battling to curb the disease. The death toll from this epidemic has passed 1 thousand as a vaccination program struggles to keep up with demand. Meningitis is an inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, usually caused by bacterial, viral, fungal or parasitic infection of the surrounding fluid. Now, we are told that the epidemic has spread to Liberia. According to media reports, the disease has spread to 23 of the country’s 36 states but does appear to be slowing down. In 1996 alone, Meningitis killed more than 11 thousand people in Nigeria. To help us discuss this epidemic we are joined on the line by: • Dr Anne von Gottberg: Clinical Microbiologist: Centre for Respiratory Diseases and Meningitis: National Institute for Communicable Diseases • Dr Mary Stephen: The WHO Disease Control and Prevention advisor, World Health Organisation • Dr Benjamin Kagina: Research Officer and Vaccinologist: Vaccines For Africa Initiative unit, Department: Public Health & Family Medicine University of Cape Town.
16
MAY
June 3, 2017 will mark the third time in five years that Lesotho has held a general election. The election comes on the heels of Democratic Congress (DC) Prime Minister Pakalitha Mosisili losing a no-confidence motion in March in Parliament. His unwieldy seven-party coalition degenerated into infighting less than two years after taking office. This is the second coalition failure in three years. In 2014, All-Basotho Convention (ABC) Prime Minister Tom Thabane’s five-party coalition crumbled only two years after taking office. The rapid disintegration of two successive coalition governments and continued political violence at the highest levels of politics and security have tarnished the hope seen at the time. Tumelo Zulu our reporter talked to Lesotho Minister of Trade Joshua Sethipa who is also a candidate for the Congress for Democracy and this is how it went: To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by: 1. Monyane Moleleki Leader and Candidate:Alliance of Democrats 2. Dr Makase Nyaphisi Commissioner IEC Lesotho 3. Prof Frances Makoa Retired politics Lecturer University of Lesotho 4. Joshua Sethipa Minister Trade Kingdom of Lesotho
15
MAY
Human Settlements Minister Lindiwe Sisulu has given the technical team tasked with responding to housing protests, two weeks to verify the housing list database in the south of Johannesburg. The Minister, together with Gauteng Human Settlements MEC Paul Mashatile and Johannesburg Mayor Herman Mashaba, met yesterday (sunday) in Soweto with the leadership of communities such as Eldorado Park, Ennerdale, Freedom Park and Kliptown about their housing concerns. These communities engaged in human Settlements Minister Lindiwe Sisulu has given the technical team tasked with responding to housing protests, two weeks to verify the housing list database in the south of Johannesburg. These communities engaged in week-long violent protests, demanding houses and other services. Wisani Makhubele has more.... We are now joined by: • Dr Herbert Maserumule, social and political commentator • Linah Nkuna, is a PhD candidate at the University of Johannesburg and a researcher at the university's Research Chair for Social Change
11
MAY
The newest relative to human beings, Homo Naledi, discovered two years ago in Africa's richest site of fossil hominin site ,in the Cradle of Humankind west of Johannesburg, South Africa, is believed to have been alive between two-hundred-and-thirty-six and three-hundred-and-thirty-five-thousand years ago. This is the finding of a group of scientists who have been scrapping for more evidence, where Naledi was discovered to corroborate their theories of human evolution. The dicovery - according to the scientists - suggests that Naledi likely lived alongside homo sapiens or first humans in Africa. It further adds onto the story of one of the greatest fossil discoveries of the past half century and of what it might mean for our understanding of human evolution. To talk to us about the significance of the Cradle of Humankind… • Dr Robin Drennan, Director of Research Development at the Wits University • Michael Worsnip is the Managing Director at Maropeng
10
MAY
Chibok girls released in Nigeria At last, following a harrowing manner in which they were forcibly taken or abducted as some analysts would say, about 84 missing Chibok girls have been finally released. That is three years after being kept captive against their will by the militant Islamic Boko Haram group from a school in Chibok in Borno State, Nigeria. According to the Nigerian government, the girls were released after extensive negotiations with the militant Islamic group. A total of 276 girls were kidnapped by this militant group on the 14th of April 2014. About 21 0f these girls, managed to escape from capture in October the same year. Unfortunately, the whereabouts of 200 other missing girls remains a mystery. To help us understand this and make sense out of it, we are now joined on the line by: Dan Shemang: Deputy Director of News Voice of Nigeria: Mausi E. Segun: Senior Nigeria Researcher: Human Rights Watch: Esther Ikubaje: Campaigner at Amnesty International Nigeria office:
09
MAY
Citizenship education in established democracies is challenged by declining youth participation in democracy. Youth disenchantment and disengagement in democracy is primarily evident in formal political behavior, especially through voting, declining membership of political parties, assisting at elections, contacting politicians, and the like. If citizenship education is to play a major role in addressing these concerns it will need to review the impact it is making on young people in schools. To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by: 1. Siphokazi Pangele Young Activist (Right 2 Know) 2. Naftali Malatji Young Businessman Diepsloot Youth Project 3. Josias Masango Member: Youth Parliament of South Africa
08
MAY
The SAMA’s are seen by many around the continent as one of the biggest events in the music industry. This year event organisers say they have seen a lot of entries by artists and record labels, in total about 700 entries. The music industry submitted entries over a three-month period starting from 01 November 2016 until 31 January 2017. After a stringent vetting process that involved officials from the Recording Industry of South Africa (RiSA) and record company representatives, these potential nominees have been handed over to panels of independent experts drawn from radio, TV, newspapers, blogs and the recording industry for the judging process to begin. In April the SAMA’s will reveal the five nominees in each category as voted for by the panel of judges and verified by independent auditors. The 23rd instalment of the SAMA’s is going to be held in Sun City in the North-West Province of South Africa. To talk to some of the nominees who will be at the SAMA’s we have in studio by: 1. The Soil: Buhlebendalo Mda (Soul Sister) Luphindo Ngxanga (Master-P) Ntsika Fana Ngxanga (Fana-Tastic) 2. Locnville: Brian Chaplin Andrew Chaplin
04
MAY
What is to be done with the quality of leadership on the continent - this was the basic question facing panelists at a discussion at the World Economic Forum for Africa taking place in Durban, South Africa. While panelists agreed on the need for greater investments in agriculture, education and entrepreneurship to lift the wellbeing of the continent's people - there was sceptism as to whether those charged with the task are up to it. To talk about leadership and other topics discussed at the Forum we have: Kevin Gallagher. Head of Financial and Risk, Africa, Thomson Reuters Lindiwe Mazibuko Public Speaker and Former South African Opposition Parliamentarian Ade Ayeyemi has been the Group Chief Executive Officer of Ecobank Transnational Incorporate Mamadou Biteye Managing Director, Africa Regional Office, The Rockefeller Foundation
03
MAY
Hundreds of delegates are attending the two-day World Economic Forum on Africa, which has just stared in Durban South Africa. African heads of state, global captains of industry and commerce and civil society leaders are set to listen to speakers in the International Convention Centre. South African President Jacob Zuma earlier welcomed delegates, saying WEF Africa comes at an opportune time, when the world economy is beginning to pick up. He's expressed hope that the forum will discuss infrastructure development in Africa. To tell us more, we have : Naledi Pandor is the Minister of Science and Technology in South Africa. Sheha Sha Managing Director of Thompson Reuters Africa Austin Okere is the Founder CWG Plc, the largest Systems Integration Company in Sub-Saharan Africa & Entrepreneur in Residence at Columbia Business School