African Dialogue

Channel Africa  |  Podcast, ±55 min episodes every 2 days
The programme discusses current issues pertaining to South Africa and the continent as a whole. The talk show hosts various experts on interesting and important issues affecting Africa and the globe.
22
JUN
It is a historic fact that the national borders imposed on the African continent by colonialism have forced ethnic group to co-exist within certain territories and to compete for resources. In the current post-colonial context for more than four decades countries such as Mali, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan, amongst many others, have experienced conflicts which are characterised by ethnic and racial divisions. To help us on this: • Paul Mulindwa, senior project officer at the Centre for Conflict Resolution • Professor Sylvester Maphosa, Chief Research Specialist at Africa Institute of South Africa (AISA) programme of the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC). : • Advocate Sabelo Sibanda Founder: The School of African Awareness and Ama-Africa-Aqotho
21
JUN
It was in July 2003 when the African Union Convention on Preventing and Combating Corruption was adopted in Maputo to fight against corruption in governments and prevent illicit financial flows on the African continent. However ever since, little progress is achieved to eradicate financial crime on African countries. It is estimated that the continent loses an estimated 50 million dollars a year to illicit financial flows. South Africa has lost more than one-point-five-trillion-rand in illicit financial flows over a period of ten years. This is according to the Chairperson of Parliament’s Standing Committee on Finance Yunus Carrim who has welcomed the gazetting of the Financial Intelligence Centre Amendment Act. The legislation seeks to curb financial crime including money laundering and scrutinise suspicious banking transaction. To help us analyse the situation we have • Leanne Govinsamy – Head of Legal and investigations at Corruption Watch • Jeggan Grey Johnson, Open Society Initiative of Southern Africa
20
JUN
War, violence and persecution worldwide are causing more people than ever to be forcibly displaced, according to a report published today by UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency. The agency’s new Global Trends report, which is the organization’s major annual survey of the state of displacement, says that at the end of 2016 there were 65.6 million people forcibly displaced worldwide, some 300 thousand more than a year earlier. This total represents an enormous number of people needing protection worldwide. This adds up to an immense human cost of war and persecution globally: 65.6 million means that on average, one in every 113 people worldwide is today someone who is displaced, a population bigger than that of the world’s 21st most populous country, the United Kingdom. To help us discuss this emotive issue we are joined on the line by: Markku Aikomus: UNHCR Regional Representation for Southern Africa in Pretoria, Roshan Dadoo: Director: Consortium for Refugees and Migrants in South Africa (CoRMSA) : Jasmine Opperman : Africa Director : The Terrorism Research and Analysis Consortium. James Chapman: Senior Refugee Attorney at the Refugee Rights Clinic, University of Cape Town:
19
JUN
The SADC community has officially congratulated the Kingdom of Lesotho for the peaceful inauguration and handover of power to the Prime Minister Tom Thabane. The inauguration comes after the coalition government collapsed under the stewardship of Prime Minister Pakalitha Mosisili who had to disband parliament. This marked the second coalition government to have failed. Prime Minister Tom Thabane of the All Basotho Convention (ABC) was removed two years after he took the high office. The Coalition government was marred by political violence and security compromise. To talk to some of the nominees who will be at the SAMA’s we have in studio by: 1. Tlohang Letsie Senior Lecturer political and Administrative Studies University of Lesotho 2. Dr Ina Gouws Senior Lecturer Political Studies and Governance University of Free State
15
JUN
Friday, 16 June 2017, is a day on which we remember the power of the younger generation. We celebrate the brave students who defended their right to equal education, and we commemorate those who lost their lives in the struggle to make South Africa a better place for all and generations to come. The need for developing young leaders is more important than ever not only in South Africa, but across the African continent. Africa cannot rely on previous models of leadership development for today's youth. For Africa to overcome the crises of leadership and governance in the continent, those on whom the burden of leadership will fall in the future must fully comprehend their responsibilities, duties and obligation. Youth leadership and development is not just about technical knowledge and competence, but is about courage, practicing good judgment, emotional intelligence, empathy and passion. To discuss this issue we are joined on the line by: • Rufaro Modimu: Chief Executive Officer of Enke (Make Your Mark)) • Ms Lebohang Pheko: Senior Research Fellow at NGO/think-tank, the Trade Collective. • Omar Badsha : South African History Online
14
JUN
In many countries, a healthy political opposition is seen as crucial to keep governments in check and to provide the electorate with a possible future alternative. But in other parts of the African continent joining an opposition party or being a leader of one, means human rights abuses, torture, incarceration and even death. The treason trial of Hakainde Hichilema, the detained President of Zambia’s largest opposition party, the United Party for National Development comes to mind. He’s facing treason charges, and treason is a non-bail able offence in Zambia, with a minimum jail term of 15 years and a maximum sentence of the death penalty. In Uganda opposition leader Kizza Besigye is in and out of court, for challenging the current president, Yuweri Museveni in last year’s elections. Opposition leaders in Zimbabwe are not also sparred from harassment and even threatened with violence. This morning we look at this worrying political TREND. To help us unpack this we are joined on the line by: Dr Samuel Oloruntoba: Senior Lecturer: International Political Economy Thabo Mbeki African Leadership Institute, University of South Africa Dennis Bloem: Congress of the People Spokesperson: Dr Jessie Kabwila: Chairperson of the Women Caucus in the Malawi Parliament
14
JUN
In many countries, a healthy political opposition is seen as crucial to keep governments in check and to provide the electorate with a possible future alternative. But in other parts of the African continent joining an opposition party or being a leader of one, means human rights abuses, torture, incarceration and even death. The treason trial of Hakainde Hichilema, the detained President of Zambia’s largest opposition party, the United Party for National Development comes to mind. He’s facing treason charges, and treason is a non-bail able offence in Zambia, with a minimum jail term of 15 years and a maximum sentence of the death penalty. In Uganda opposition leader Kizza Besigye is in and out of court, for challenging the current president, Yuweri Museveni in last year’s elections. Opposition leaders in Zimbabwe are not also sparred from harassment and even threatened with violence. This morning we look at this worrying political TREND. To help us unpack this we are joined on the line by: Dr Samuel Oloruntoba: Senior Lecturer: International Political Economy Thabo Mbeki African Leadership Institute, University of South Africa Dennis Bloem: Congress of the People Spokesperson: Dr Jessie Kabwila: Chairperson of the Women Caucus in the Malawi Parliament
13
JUN
Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Bahrain severed their ties with Qatar on Monday, accusing it of supporting Islamist groups, opening up the worst rift in years among some of the most powerful states in the Arab world. The coordinated move dramatically escalated a dispute over Qatar's support of the Muslim Brotherhood, the world's oldest Islamic movement, and added accusations that Doha even backs the agenda of regional rival Iran. Announcing the closure of transport ties with Qatar, the three Gulf states gave Qatari visitors and residents two weeks to leave their countries. Qatar was also expelled from a Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen. To make sense of all this, we are joined on the line by: Naeem Jeena: Executive Director of the Afro-Middle East Centre Zeenat Adam: An independent International Strategist
12
JUN
British Prime Minister Theresa May's office says talks were still ongoing with the Democratic Unionist Party on seeking its support for a Conservative government after earlier saying an outline agreement had been reached. Meanwhile, Former Ulster Unionist Party leader Lord Empey warned Theresa May that she should get feedback from her MPs before entering into an arrangement with the DUP. To assist us on this: • Prof Jo Anise van Wyk, political science at UNISA • Asmita Pashotam, researcher of economic diplomacy SAIIA • Jamie Martin, former special adviser to British government ministers including Theresa May.
08
JUN
The Mo Ibrahim foundation says the future of Africa depends on the ability to meet the expectations of its young people. In a continent where the average age of leaders is at 65 years, in the year 2050 Africa will be home to over 452 million people who are under the age 25. The current leadership of African countries seem to be ailing, frail and sick, some of them not so much in touch with the needs of the youth demographic. Why is Africa so saddled with leaders who ought to be enjoying their retirement in peace and quiet, instead of in the unforgiving political corridors, campaign trails and taxing political brinkmanship that challenge even the youngest leaders? If the average age of the continent is 19.5, why is the average age of leadership 65? To help us unpack and discuss this further we are joined on the line by: 1. Dr Sydney Mufamadi Director School of Leadership University of Johannesburg 2. Thami Ntenteni Head: Communications Thabo Mbeki Foundation 3. Richard Jurgens Editor: Africa in Fact Journal : Good Governance Africa 4. Dr Samuel Oloruntoba Senior Lecturer International Political Economy Thabo Mbeki African Leadership Institute University of South Africa
08
JUN
BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and SA) are currently experiencing slow economic growth and are facing political instabilities. Hence, both critics and supporters of the economic grouping are starting to question the survival of Brics’ progress and economic strength. The group’s economic giant, China, has also received criticism for its agenda as it has been pushing Pakistan, Laos and many Central Asia countries to agreeing to high interest projects that will deepen these countries’ debt. South Africa and Brazil have been pointed out for their corruption and political instability hence weakening investment confidence. The question we ask today is: Can Brics survive despite the current global economic environment? • Arina Muresan, researcher from the Institute for Global Dialogue (IGD • Cyril Prinsloo researcher from South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) STUDIO • Dr Jaya Josie from the BRICS Research Centre, (HSRC).
08
JUN
The first step towards building a more secure internet in Africa has been taken by the Internet Society and the African Union Commission, which have unveiled a new set of Internet Infrastructure Security Guidelines for Africa during the African Internet Summit last week. The guidelines will help Africa create a more secure internet infrastructure, and are set to change the way African Union States approach cyber security preparedness. The guidelines, the first of their kind in Africa, were developed by a multi-stakeholder group of African and global internet infrastructure security experts, and are the first step towards building a more secure internet in Africa. To help discuss this milestone, we are joined on the line by: Dawit Bekele: Internet Society Regional Bureau Director for Africa Arthur Goldstuck: Managing Director of World Wide Worx Dr Peter Tobin, Chief Executive Officer management consulting practice Peter Tobin Consultancy: Dr Aleksandar Valjarevic : Cyber Security Expert from LawTrust in Pretoria South Africa: