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14
OCT

Babbage: The Metaverse is coming

We explore computer-generated virtual worlds and their use in everything from film-making to architecture. What will it take to build a real Metaverse, a persistent virtual world that anyone can plug into? This vision, though born in the minds of science fiction writers, is shaping the real-world ambitions of much of the tech world. Host Alok Jha talks to author Neal Stephenson, VR pioneer Jaron Lanier and the VFX team behind The Mandalorian. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
07
OCT

Babbage: Nobel minds

Host Kenneth Cukier explores the science honoured in this year’s Nobel prizes. Our correspondents assess the life-saving impact of the identification of hepatitis C, speak to one of this year’s winners for physics, Andrea Ghez, about her work unveiling the mysteries of the cosmos, and Jennifer Doudna, co-developer of CRISPR-Cas9, on the potential of genome editing. Plus, can the awards adapt to modern science?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
30
SEP

Babbage: Apple's Epic battle

This week a judge heard the first arguments in an antitrust case that could reshape the software ecosystem. Who will be the real winners and losers of this digital deathmatch? Quantum computers have limited capabilities, but the technology may yet live up to its promise. And, how understanding the evolutionary history of exercise could help get people moving. Kenneth Cukier hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
23
SEP

Babbage: Pandemic’s progress

As the global covid-19 death toll nears 1 million, The Economist’s healthcare correspondent and health policy editor explain what scientists are still investigating about the virus, how long-lasting is the immune response and how the pandemic can be tamed. And, the model of Taiwan—is it “post-pandemic”? Kenneth Cukier hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
16
SEP

Babbage: Rosalind Franklin

100 years after the British scientist Rosalind Franklin's birth, The Economist’s health policy editor Natasha Loder explores her scientific achievements—from photographing the double helix of DNA to discovering the first three-dimensional structure of a virus. And, how does Franklin’s work help the study of covid-19?
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02
SEP

Babbage: The fast and the spurious

Governments around the world are approving covid-19 drugs and vaccines at an unprecedented speed, but Natasha Loder, The Economist's Health Policy Editor, warns of the dangers that this could cause. Also, is Elon Musk's plan to link a computer to human brains science or spin? And, take a deep breath—author James Nestor on improving the quality of our breathing. Kenneth Cukier hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26
AUG

Babbage: Viruses, lords of creation

These tiny, ancient predators do more than cause pandemics. Host Kenneth Cukier and science editor Geoff Carr investigate how viruses have shaped the world. Evolutionary biologist David Enard explains how viruses have driven human development. And Jennifer Doudna, who pioneered CRISPR gene editing, and Steffanie Strathdee, an innovator in phage therapy, show how cells’ antiviral defences as well as  viruses themselves can be harnessed to protect the future of humanity. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
19
AUG

Babbage: Long-haul plight

Some victims of covid-19 continue to suffer from the illness many weeks and months after falling ill. What can be done to help these “long-haulers”? Also, the technology writer Matt Ridley on how innovation works. And, a possible solution to 2020’s other plague: locust swarms. Kenneth Cukier hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
12
AUG

Babbage: WeFight

For Chinese users, WeChat does far more than just messaging. What are the implications of America’s proposed ban on the Chinese “super app”? Also, Canada’s last Arctic shelf has collapsed, and climate change is to blame. And a sizzling solution to indoor barbeque pollution. Tom Standage hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer
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05
AUG

Babbage: Put to the test

A shortage of covid-19 tests around the world has hampered efforts to contain it. Could "pool sampling" be a solution? Also, the promise of million-mile electric car batteries? And, Magdalena Zernicka-Goetz, a developmental biologist at the University of Cambridge and Caltech, on the mysteries of life after conception. Kenneth Cukier hosts  Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
29
JUL

Babbage: Life on Mars?

Three nations set out on separate missions to shed light on a question that astronomers have been asking for centuries—is there life on Mars? Alok Jha asks leading scientists about how their missions will search for signs of life on the red planet. And, why those investigating it should avoid irreversible damage to a potentially pristine ecosystem.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22
JUL

Babbage: A punt on the Oxford vaccine

Oxford University is ahead in the race to develop a covid-19 vaccine that could halt the pandemic. Yet lead researcher, Professor Sarah Gilbert, says some trial results may be delayed owing to changing virus transmissions in different countries. Also, navigating the sky with diamonds. And, why sewage can help census-takers. Kenneth Cukier hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer
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