World Business Report

BBC  |  Podcast, ±15 min episodes every 16 hours
Analysis of the big global business and economic issues, as they affect consumers and investors. Broadcast on weekdays.
27
MAR
2am
As thousands of protestors take to the streets in Russia complaining of corruption within the political system, Vladimir Putin meets with President Hassan Rouhani of Iran. We ask what is likely to be discussed and what it could mean for trade between the two countries.Hours after Carrie Lam is selected as the news Chief Executive of Hong Kong, we talk to the BBC’s Juliana Liu about what it means for the business community and for the city in general.Taxi company Uber has withdrawn all of the driverless vehicles being tested, following a collision in the US. BBC Technology Correspondent Dave Lee wonders whether there might be more to the decision than just one accident.And as the most visited theme park in Europe celebrates a big anniversary, we reflect on 25 years of Disneyland Paris.
27
MAR
2am
World markets head lower on fears over President Trump's ability to achieve policy goals, following an embarrassing defeat on healthcare reform. We hear from New York and London. Plus, professor David Cutler of Harvard University considers the prospects for promised tax cuts, without the federal budget savings promised by an Obamacare repeal. Also in the programme, Britain's home secretary thinks technology companies should share the encryption secrets of communications platforms like WhatsApp in order to prevent terrorism. Alan Woodward is a cybersecurity expert at Britain's University of Surrey, and gives us his perspective. Meat sellers are on strike in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, because of a crackdown on illegal slaughterhouses. The BBC's Vineet Khare reports from the state. United Airlines reportedly banned two young girls from flying whilst wearing leggings, as they were on discounted tickets for families of staff. Jennifer Cox is a travel writer and broadcaster, and responds to the news. Plus Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times tells us what the viral video of a BBC interview gone wrong says about the gap between our work personas and our private lives.
25
MAR
2am
It's being seen as the biggest setback so far for the Trump presidency. The healthcare reform bill, drawn up by the House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan and backed by the president was finally pulled in the last few hours. Two days of delayed voting revealed what many already assumed: there were not enough votes to get it through. We ask Daniel Lippman, reporter for Politico and a co-author of Politico's Playbook how big a setback this is for Donald Trump? Peter Jankovkis of Oakbrook Investments in Chicago explains how the markets have reacted.
24
MAR
2am
Uncertainty over the progress of President Trump's healthcare bill through Congress cast something of a shadow over Wall Street. Investors fear that if it runs into serious trouble, that could cast doubt over his ambition to cut taxes too, as we heard hear from Cary Leahy of Decision Economics in New York.
23
MAR
2am
President Trump's proposed healthcare reforms, which would repeal large parts of Obamacare, face an important vote in Congress. But it's not going to be plain sailing - tense negotiations are underway in Washington, as the President lobbies to win support. Meanwhile, we discuss why the South Korean government is giving a multi-billion dollar bailout to one of the country's biggest shipbuilders.And whatever happened to the business lunch? We explore its demise.
22
MAR
2am
We ask if the ban is designed to protect the interests of US airline giants by hurting their Middle Eastern rivals, as well as ensuring passenger safety. Brian Kelly runs a New York based travel website called The Points Guy, and offers us his perspective. Also in the programme, Ghana's new government promises to build a factory in every district to revive the economy. Israel Laryea, news editor at Multimedia Broadcasting in Accra, tells us if the plan is likely to work. Plus, on World Water Day, we hear from David Smith of consultancy firm MWH about the part business can play in bringing fresh water supplies to a thirsty planet.
21
MAR
2am
UK and US authorities have banned large electronic items in cabin baggage on some flights. Affected airports include some of the busiest hubs in the Middle East, Turkey and North Africa. Tom Blank, a former security policy chief of the US Transportation Security Administration, explains why the ban has been implemented. Also in the programme, the BBC's Joe Miller gets a glimpse of the robotic world of the future from digital companies at the CeBIT technology conference in Hanover, Germany. Scotland's government is debating a new independence referendum, and we get the views of our regular economic commentator Roger Bootle of Capital Economics. In a bid to improve road safety, the Japanese government is offering pensioners who give up driving discounts on noodles, taxis and even funerals. Matt Saunders is road test editor at the motoring website Autocar, and tells us what he makes of the initiative. Plus, as gin undergoes a surge in popularity around the world, the BBC's Mike Johnson reports from the London Gin Festival.
17
MAR
2am
Donald Trump has had his first personal encounter with the German leader Angela Merkel. During his election campaign he claimed that his opponent, Hillary Clinton wanted to be a US version of Mrs Merkel - and that wasn't meant as a compliment. Meanwhile, in Baden Baden, in Germany, America's Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin is meeting finance ministers from the biggest economies in the world - their aim: avoiding a global trade war.