Drivetime

The Voice of the Cape  |  Podcast, ±11 min episodes every 12 hours
The Drivetime Show is hosted by Shafiq Morton and has a national and international flavour. During the show the interviews will focus on issues making news nationally, be it the enquiry into the Arms Deal to the current famine in the Horn of Africa. The after five interview on Drivetime, will usually be the analysis slot where the biggest story of the day or week is analyzed. During this show listener participation is encourage via the station’s sms facility.
18
JUL
4pm
Turkey has begun a purge of soldiers and judiciary officials allegedly connected to an effort to topple the government, one day after a failed military coup attempt. By Saturday evening, the government of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan had detained 2,839 military personnel, with the number of arrests expected to rise, according to Prime Minister Binali Yildirim. Turkey's top judicial body, the HSYK, dismissed 2,745 judges on Saturday, according to Turkey's Anadolu news agency. Guest: Ali Osman Mert Position: Dr of Political Science and Turkish Presidential Aide
15
JUL
4pm
Yolisa Qunta is an associate editor at Jucyafrica.com and a columnist at allforwomen.co.za. She spent her formative years in Zimbabwe and Botswana as a child to political exiles and returned to South Africa with her family in 1993. She is the first time author of the book "Writing What We Like", a compilation of essays which includes the voices of Shaka Sisulu, Ilhaam Rawoot, Nama Xam, Lwandile Fikeni, Sibusiso Tsabalala among others. Released last month her book is already on the top ten seller's at Exclusive books. We chat to her today about the what has been described as a snapshot of what smart, young South Africans think about... Guest: Yolisa Qunta
13
JUL
4pm
Ayanda Mabulu is no stranger to controversy, but he might have outdone himself this week in terms of pure shock value. In his latest exhibition at Constitutional Hill, one of the paintings continues his tradition of portraying President Jacob Zuma in compromising, arguably degrading, positions. On Wednesday morning, Mabulu defended his artwork and explained why the graphic nature of it is appropriate. In an interview, he said that his paintings are merely manifestations of South Africa’s realities. But other's may argue otherwise... Guest: Athi Joja Position: Art Critic, his work has been featured in the Con Mag and Mail and Guardian
12
JUL
4pm
At least 32 people have died and more than 1,000 injured in spiralling violence in Jammu and Kashmir following Burhan Wani’s death, with Prime Minister Narendra Modi chairing a meeting on Tuesday to review the volatile situation in the valley. Union home minister Rajnath Singh, defence minister Manohar Parrikar and other senior officials attended the meeting to discuss ways to end the protests that have paralysed normal life amid curfew-like restrictions and a separatists-sponsored strike. Seething crowds have pelted stones and attacked security installations. In return, security forces have used teargas canisters, pellets, and even bullets. Protesters, mostly young men, have died. A policeman, too, was killed. We find out more from Aurangzeb Naqshbandi... Position: Senior political reporter for the Hindustan Times
12
JUL
4pm
The recent fatalities involving black men and white police have a long history, coupled with a pattern of government inaction and unwillingness to take action against white perpetrators and police abuse in cases of violence against African Americans... Guest: Ronald A. Kuykendall Position: Political Science Lecturer at Trident Technical College in Charleston, South Carolina. His research interests are in the areas of race and radical African American social and political thought.
11
JUL
4pm
Abdul Sattar Edhi, the founder of one of Pakistan’s largest public welfare charities, has become the first Pakistani in more than a quarter of a century to be honoured with a state funeral. Edhi, believed to be in his early nineties, died of kidney failure in a Karachi hospital having become increasingly frail in recent years. The pomp and military ceremony of his funeral at Karachi’s national stadium on Saturday was in stark contrast to the famously humble style of the man who only owned two sets of clothes and lived in a windowless room next to his small office in a Karachi slum. Today we pay tribute to him by looking at the great work that he has done... Guest: Alia Chughtai Position: Journalist based in Karachi
08
JUL
4pm
Blue Eland Foxtrot is a dramatic, satirical book that focuses on South Africa during the 70’s and 80’s. The book takes a historical look at South Africa during the height of Apartheid with references and humorous insights into the post-apartheid utopia that we all call home today. Willie Currie is currently writing novels and studying the psychology of groups. In the 2000s, Currie was the Communications Policy Manager of the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) and a Councillor at the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA).
07
JUL
5pm
Britain decided to join the 2003 invasion of Iraq based on "flawed intelligence" which was not challenged and should have been, said the Chilcot report which has taken seven years to prepare. John Chilcot, the chairman of the Iraq Inquiry and a retired civil servant, said on Wednesday that the invasion went "badly wrong". It said former prime minister Tony Blair committed to war before peaceful options had been exhausted and that the legality of his case was questionable. But what of the implications... Guest: Moazzam Begg Position: Outreach Director for CAGE.
05
JUL
4pm
The bombing at the Prophet's Mosque in the city of Medina was the third attack to hit the kingdom, following blasts in the cities of Jeddah and Qatif. The blast struck moments before sunset prayers when people were breaking their fast inside the mosque. The mosque, which is also known as Al-Masjid an-Nabawi, is visited by pilgrims from around the world during the final days of the fasting month of Ramadan. Guest: Dr. Madawi Al-Rashid. Position: Visiting professor at the Middle East Institute at the National University of Singapore as well as a columnist for Al-Monitor's Gulf Pulse. She has written extensively about the Arabian Peninsula, Arab migration, globalization, religious transnationalism and gender.
04
JUL
4pm
EBRAHIM RASOOL, FORMER AMBASSADOR of South Africa to the United States and Georgetown University’s distinguished scholar-in-residence. Ambassador of South Africa from 2010 until early 2015, he joined the Al Waleed bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding (CMCU), housed in Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service. Rasool will spend his 15 months at Georgetown working on a book about re-imagining Islam, mentoring students and speaking to members of the university community about his experience. prior to his ambassadorship, Rasool served from 2004 to 2008 as premier of South Africa’s Western Cape province, which includes Cape Town as its capital, governing as a member of the African National Congress. He became a special advisor to South African president Kgalema Motlanthe in 2008 and 2009, and was later elected to parliament in the National Assembly, where he served until 2010.
27
JUN
4pm
A new report published by Human Rights Watch on the Oromo protests depicts a disturbing picture of a government that thrives on systematic repression and official violence. The report, which puts the death toll from the seven-month-long protest at more than 400, exposes the "Ethiopia rising" narrative for what it is: a political Ponzi scheme. Underneath the selective highlighting of Ethiopia's story of renaissance and transformation lies a Janus-faced reality in which the triumph of some has meant the utter submission of others. Guest: Awol K. Allo Position: Fellow in Human Rights at the London School of Economics and Political Science