The Forum@8

SAfm  |  Podcast, ±47 min episodes every day  |  Broadcast schedule
The Forum@8 is a feature of AMLive with in-depth and interactive discussion on the main story of the day. The Forum@8 is on every week day from 8 to 9am on SAfm radio 104-107 FM nationwide.
27
MAR
There is no end in sight, for the social workers' strike, even though negotiations between the union NEHAWU and the Department of Social Development wrapped up last week. Workers have been demanding, among other things, the introduction of a rural allowance, the absorption of unemployed social workers on a permanent basis and improved conditions of service for employees in the department. The strike has disrupted operations at hospitals and care centers in various provinces, with many patients struggling to access health services. Patients in ICU and those seeking emergency services have faced risks. A six-month-old baby died after she was moved from Walter Sisulu Child and Youth Care Centre in Soweto to Bethany Trust Home in Krugersdorp. On the Forum@8 this morning, we find out what are the real issues with this particular strike. "Couldn't the nehawu strike be avoided?" Sakina Kamwendo speaks to Mike Shingange, Nehawu first Deptuy President and experienced professional health worker, Ms Frayne Mathijs.
23
MAR
Issues of grown children, and the strain they have on parents in society are the focus for this morning's Forum@8. It's about the issues that generate tensions for parents and their adult children (adult sons and daughters, and their mothers and fathers). Parent-child relationship is thankfully, one of the most long-lasting and emotionally intense social ties. But why does it also include feelings of irritation, tension, and ambivalence, among others? We also take a look at ties that refuse to be broken. When is it the right time for a parent's offspring to move out? Sakina Kamwendo tries to find answers to these questions by speaking to Dr Hannetjie Edeling, a counselling psychologist in private practice who is also a member of Psychological Society of South Africa (PsySSA) and Icamagu Institute's, Dr Nokuzola Mndende.
22
MAR
In a bid to combat high teenage pregnancy rates, a recent news article in the Sowetan says that a high school in Mpumalanga is forcing girl pupils to sign a form committing that they will not fall pregnant. The contract states that if they fall pregnant they will be forced to leave the school. According to the report, parents also had to sign the form . While several pupils and parents have complied, others have raised concerns that the policy is not fair. In a survey, the Education Department found that in the first term in 2016 there were 1361 pregnant pupils in Mpumalanga schools, compared to 1496 in 2015. Sakina Kamwendo speaks to Jabu Mabuza, Chief Education Specialist for School Governance and Matakanye Matakanye, Gen Secretary for the National Association of School Governing Bodies, for more.
21
MAR
The story of Sphamandla Choma‚ the 14-year-old boy who was left paralysed after he was allegedly assaulted last year by his school principal in Middelburg in Mpumalanga, shocked many in the country. Sphamandla died on Sunday night. On the Forum@8 today, we discuss whether he will get justice and if his family's impoverished background played a role in how the matter was handled. Does this speak to the many poor South Africans whose rights are violated because they are poor. Meanwhile, a 2017 Human Rights Watch World report on South Africa has revealed that the public's confidence in the government's willingness to tackle human rights violations, corruption, and respect for the rule of law, has been eroded. The report says South Africa continues to face a number of human rights challenges. It highlights events such as the xenophobic attacks on foreigners, the fees must fall protests and government's failure to ensure that an estimated half-million children with disabilities have access to basic education. Sakina Kamwendo speaks to Mark Heywood of Section 27
17
MAR
On the Forum@8 this morning we host South African entreprenuer Gil Oved. He is the co-founder and co-CEO of one of South Africa's largest advertising agency, The Creative Counsel. He is a member of the global Young Presidents' Organisation where he is the Johannesburg chapter chair as well as the Africa regional forum officer. Gil recently recieved the EY Southern Africa World Entrepreneur Award for 2016 in the Exceptional category, with the World Entrepreneur Awards recognising entrepreneurs for their vision, innovation, courage, and leadership. Sakina Kamwendo speaks to entrepreneur Gil Oved.
16
MAR
A heated energy debate has raged for some time in South Africa, exposing the intricacies of the country's energy mix. The jostling has largely been dominated by the Independent Power Producers, who've accused Eskom of refusing to sign them up.The SA Renewable Energy Council claims that Eskom is abusing its position as it controls both the grid and the bulk of power generation. They also suggest the power utility should be split to separate the generation component from the grid component, and that the grid component should be independent of who ever supplies power to the grid. On the Forum@8, we focus on these 'Energy Mix debates in South Africa as we ask: 'What's the best energy mix the country needs?" Sakina Kamwendo engages Matshela Koko, ESKOM Acting Group Chief Executive and Brenda Martin from the South African Renewable Energy Council (SAREC).
15
MAR
While experts say South Africa's real maths problem is language, Professor of mathematics and University of Cape Town deputy vice-chancellor of research and internationalisation Mamokgethi Phakeng believes the solution lies in a multilingual approach to mathematics teaching, rather than in imposing home languages on students. On the Forum@8 this morning, Sakina Kamwendo spoke to her about the link between mother tongue and learning mathematics...
14
MAR
South Africa's prisons are deemed to be the most overcrowded correctional centers in Africa and one of the reasons according to experts, is that police are jailing too many people for petty crimes. Studies have shown that many inmates spend years behind bars just waiting for their trial to reach the courts, and researchers say the justice system does little to protect the criminals who are subjected to more crime inside the prison walls than outside. Activists say that many end up in gangs and many youngsters are raped while awaiting trial. On the Forum@8 we look at the prison conditions and how prisoners are protected and rehabilitated under the system. Ike Phahla speaks to Zach Modise, National Commissioner of Correctional Services, and Ms Betzi Pierce, National Operations Manager at the National Institute for Crime Prevention and the Reintegration of Offenders( NICRO) for more.
13
MAR
Oxfam South Africa is calling for government to decriminalise informal mining. This after a five year old boy who fell into a disused mine in Boksburg and 14 illegal miners were found dead in derelict mines in Benoni in Gauteng's East rand. The organisation says the deaths were avoidable and are a symptom of much bigger problems faced by communities living alongside abandoned mines. Thembinkosi Dlamini from Oxfam South Africa and Deputy Minister at the Department of Mineral Resources, Godfrey Oliphant, speak to Bongi Gwala.
10
MAR
A lot has been done to protect the rights of women and to give the girl child a voice. Women are taking up leadership roles, they are involved in academia, and careers that were male-dominated have now been embraced by women. According to human rights activists the progress is impressive, but they caution that this should not be at the expense of the boy child. On the Forum@8 this morning we look at whether we have taken a back seat in ensuring that both genders are equally progressive, asking if society is neglecting the boy child with Programme Manager for Brothers for Life, Mogale Mashiapata...
09
MAR
A newly-released study on land reform has revealed that the system in South Africa favours agricultural businesses and sidelines the intended beneficiaries, plunging the programme into crisis. According to researchers Ruth Hall and Thembela Kepe, the aim of the study was to find out if the current approach achieves the goals of land reform and addresses the problems that were identified under previous programmes. The report says land reform has changed from a system where the state assisted poor households to purchase land into one where the state purchases the land and then leases it to beneficiaries. Sakina Kamwendo speaks to Associate Professor Ruth Hall co -author and Professor Lungisile Ntsebeza, Director and Holder of the A.C. Jordan Chair in African Studies and the NRF Research Chair in Land Reform and Democracy in South Africa, Centre for African Studies
08
MAR
Sakina Kamwendo speak to Social activist and founding secretary of the Congress of Trade Union, Cosatu Jay Naidoo about his latest book Change, organising tomorrow, today. In the book Jay Naidoo says; unless there is significant change, the world is heading for an explosion. In the book, Naidoo harnesses his experience as a union organiser, government minister, social entrepreneur and global thought leader. He explores ways of solving some of the world's biggest problems